Claim Ownership

Author:

Subscribed: 0Played: 0
Share

Description

 Episodes
Reverse
The art of conversation

The art of conversation

2022-11-2406:1917

We discuss whether the art of conversation is being lost in the era of social media
Qatar's World Cup workers

Qatar's World Cup workers

2022-11-1706:1135

Hear about the workers who built the World Cup stadiums
Controlling the weather

Controlling the weather

2022-11-1006:1736

We discuss two different types of weather manipulation.
Meet the flavourists

Meet the flavourists

2022-11-0306:2023

Is designing a food flavour a dark art? We talk about the people who make flavours.
Some parents are complaining that some Halloween costumes are too scary.
We discuss how extreme weather events are affecting our mental health.
Translating recipes

Translating recipes

2022-10-1306:2045

How to adapt dishes from other countries? We talk about it and teach you vocabulary.
We talk about Mozart, Jimi Hendrix and teach you vocabulary.
Why are prices going up?

Why are prices going up?

2022-09-2906:2151

We discuss inflation and economics and teach related vocabulary.
English for dating online

English for dating online

2022-09-2206:2046

We discuss language that gets used for dating online and new language that is emerging.
We discuss the advantages of the design of the human body, and teach you vocabulary too.
Hear about two people who dared to follow their dreams and are happy to have done so.
Are emojis turning us into lazy writers?
Being a beauty influencer

Being a beauty influencer

2022-08-2506:1952

Hear about women who are using social media to change attitudes to beauty
Women in the workplace

Women in the workplace

2022-08-1806:1898

Hear about the career-killing tasks that are holding women back in the workplace
How do you connect the unconnected?
How pandemics end

How pandemics end

2022-08-0406:2464

Covid-19, The Black Death ... We discuss what happens when deadly diseases go global.
We talk about some new expressions that have been introduced to English through the media
From monster killers of the sea to endangered species - we talk sharks and vocabulary.
We discuss the impact of climate change on today's wildlife.
Comments (912)

Zahra Nejatinezhad

where is the podcasts text?

Nov 27th
Reply

Shokoofe Hosseini

This week's question Young people are often the biggest users of mobile phones, but in a 2016 study, what percentage of British teenagers said they would prefer to send a text rather than speak to someone, even if they were in the same room? Is it... a) 9 percent? b) 49 percent? c) 99 percent? Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary intonation musical way someone’s voice rises and falls when speaking; vocal changes which often effect the meaning of what is said intention idea or plan of something you are going to do phrase small group of words often with a particular meaning in person actually physically present or face to face, instead of via email, telephone or text get annoyed become angry, upset or irritated minefield / treading on mines situation full of hidden problems and dangers where people need to act carefully Transcript Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript Neil Hello. This is 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English. I’m Neil. Georgina And I’m Georgina Neil Can I ask you something, Georgina…? Georgina Mm-mm-hmm. Neil Georgina? I said, I want to ask you something… are you listening to me?! Georgina Mm-hmm, just a second, Neil, I’m texting a friend… Neil Ah, has this ever happened you? Someone too busy texting to talk. With the huge rise of mobile phones in recent decades, communicating by text has become more and more popular and scenes like this have become increasingly common. Georgina …and send! There, all done! Now, what were you saying, Neil? Neil In this programme, we’ll be investigating why people often choose to text, instead of talk to the people in their lives. We’ll be asking whether this popular form of communication is changing how we interact with each other. Georgina And, of course, we’ll be learning some related vocabulary as well. Now, Neil, what did you want to ask me? Neil My quiz question, Georgina, which is this. Young people are often the biggest users of mobile phones, but in a 2016 study, what percentage of British teenagers said they would prefer to send a text rather than speak to someone, even if they were in the same room? Is it: a) 9 percent?, b) 49 percent?, or, c) 99 percent? Georgina That sounds pretty shocking! I can’t believe 99 percent of teenagers said that, so I’ll guess b) 49 percent. Neil OK, Georgina. We’ll find out later if that’s right. In one way, the popularity of texting, sometimes called ‘talking with thumbs’, is understandable - people like to be in control of what they say. Georgina But this low-risk way of hiding behind a screen may come at a cost, as neuroscientist, Professor Sophie Scott, explained to Sandra Kanthal, for BBC World Service programme, The Why Factor: Sandra Kanthal When we ‘talk with our thumbs’ by text or email or instant message, we’re often prioritising speed over clarity and depth. But when we can’t hear the way someone is speaking it’s all too easy to misunderstand their intention. Sophie Scott So if I say a phrase like, ‘Oh shut up!’ - has a different meaning than, ‘Oh shut up!’ There’s an emotional thing there but also a strong kind of intonation: one’s sort of funny, one’s just aggressive. Written down it’s just aggressive – ‘Shut up!’ - and you can’t soften that. […] We always speak with melody and intonation to our voice and we’ll change our meaning depending on that. You take that channel of information out of communication you lose another way that sense is being conveyed. Neil When reading a text instead of listening to someone speak, we miss out on the speaker’s intonation – that’s the way the voice rises and falls when speaking. Georgina Intonation, how a word is said, often changes the meaning of words and phrases - small groups of words people use to say something particular. Neil Reading a phrase like, ‘Oh shut up!’ in a text, instead of hearing it spoken aloud, makes it easy to misunderstand the speaker‘s intention – their aim, or plan of what they want to do. Georgina And it’s not just the speaker’s intention that we miss. A whole range of extra information is conveyed through speech, from the speaker’s age and gender to the region they’re from. Neil Poet, Gary Turk, believes that we lose something uniquely human when we stop talking. And there are practical problems involved with texting too, as he explains to BBC World Service’s, The Why Factor: Gary Turk If you speak to someone in person and they don’t respond right away, that would be rude. But you might be speaking to someone in person and someone texts you... and it would be ruder for you then to stop that conversation and speak to the person over text… yet the person on the other side of the text is getting annoyed – you haven’t responded right way – it’s like we’re constantly now creating these situations using our phones that allow us to like tread on mines – no matter what you do, we’re going to disappoint people because we’re trying to communicate in so many different ways. Do you prioritise the person on the phone? Would you prioritise the person you’re speaking to? Who do you disappoint first? You’re going to disappoint somebody. Georgina So what should you do if a friend texts you when you’re already speaking to someone else in person – physically present, face to face? Neil You can’t communicate with both people at the same time, so whatever you do someone will get annoyed – become angry and upset. Georgina Gary thinks that despite its convenience, texting creates situations where we have to tread on mines, another way of saying that something is a minefield, meaning a situation full of hidden problems and dangers, where people need to take care. Neil Yes, it’s easy to get annoyed when someone ignores you to text their friend… Georgina Oh, you’re not still upset about that are you, Neil? Neil Ha, it’s like those teenagers in my quiz question! Remember I asked you how many teenagers said they’d prefer to text someone, even if they were in the same room. Georgina I guessed it was b) 49 percent. Neil Which was… the correct answer! I’m glad you were listening, Georgina, and not texting! Georgina Ha ha! In this programme we’ve been discussing ways in which texting differs from talking with someone in person – or face to face. Neil Sending texts instead of having a conversation means we don’t hear the speaker’s intonation – the musical way their voice rises and falls. A phrase - or small group of words - like ‘Oh shut up!’, means different things when said in different ways. Georgina Without intonation we can easily misunderstand a text writer’s intention – their idea or plan of what they are going to do. Neil Which in turns means they can get annoyed – or become irritated, if you don’t understand what they mean, or don’t respond right away. Georgina All of which can create an absolute minefield – a situation with many hidden problems, where you need to speak and act carefully. Neil And that’s all we have time for in this programme, but remember you can find more useful vocabulary, trending topics and help with your language learning here at BBC Learning English. We also have an app that you can download for free from the app stores and of course we are all over social media. Bye for now! Georgina Bye!

Nov 27th
Reply

Fatima Abedin

thnks for the information🌹

Nov 22nd
Reply

ID27248602

Hello, please insert the transcripts for all episodes. It is very helpful. Thanks

Nov 18th
Reply

MustAfa Zadjafar

سلام پاکست دانلود شده پلی نمی شه مشکل کاست؟

Nov 11th
Reply

Charles Stone

When I'm lonely and I want to go on a date, I meet a guy on this dating site https://www.sofiadate.com/conservative-women/ and I always find a pretty girl and have a good evening in a nice company. I like that I can meet girls from different cities and countries. I am not looking for a serious relationship yet, so do not judge strictly)

Nov 11th
Reply

John Skinner

The demand for online dating has skyrocketed since the covid lockdowns. I myself preferred to use tenderbang. The fact is that I was in an official relationship when I decided that I needed a new person. And I came in cheating chat room hoping to find an understanding woman. Well .. my hopes came true completely)) Now I have a second marriage)

Nov 11th
Reply

Jafar Masoudi

Please make a podcast for Iranian women and mahsa amini our hero

Nov 5th
Reply (2)

Quiz Doz

متن کجاست؟

Nov 4th
Reply

Karter Bell

HsunnyStore is an online toy store,like action figures, Cartoon characters,3rd Party Transformers, and Masterpiece Transformers,we have everything! url:https://www.hsunny.store/

Nov 2nd
Reply

keyvan alkhamis

Introduction Halloween is celebrated all over the world at this time of year, but with parents complaining that some costumes are too scary, is the festival still just harmless fun? Sam and Neil discuss the topic and teach you related vocabulary along the way. This week's question Why did people traditionally dress up in costumes on Halloween? a) to scare their neighbours as a joke b) to use up their old clothes c) to hide from ghosts Listen to the programme to find out the answer. Vocabulary trick-or-treating Halloween tradition where children dress up in scary costumes and go knocking on neighbours' doors shouting 'trick or treat'. If the person who answers the door does not give the children a treat, such a sweets or candy, they play a trick on them over the top (OTT) too extreme, unsuitable and therefore unacceptable the Grim Reaper imaginary character who represents Death and looks like a skeleton, wearing a long black cloak and carrying a curved cutting tool called a scythe. race to the bottom situation in which companies compete with each other to sell products as cheaply as possible; situation in which the standard of something gets worse and worse halfway house arrangement which includes features of two contrasting idea; compromise snowflake generation way of describing the generation of young people who become adults in or after the 2010s, and who are considered by some to be easily upset and offended TRANSCRIPT Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript. Sam Hello. This is 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English. I’m Sam. Neil And I’m Neil. Whoo-oo-oo! Trick or treat! Sam For listeners at home, Neil is dressed up as a ghost. He’s wearing a white bedsheet over his head with two holes cut out for his eyes, which must mean… Neil It’s Halloween! The start of autumn, when the days get shorter and leaves fall from the trees, marks Halloween, a festival which is celebrated all over the world at this time of year. In Britain, people carve scary faces into pumpkins and children go trick-or-treating, dressing up in fancy dress costumes and visiting people’s homes shouting, ‘trick or treat!’ for sweets and candy. Sam Halloween comes from an ancient festival called Samhain which celebrated the changing of the seasons, a time when it was believed the dead could make contact with the living, which is why children dress up as ghosts, witches and other scary monsters. Neil But recently, online shops have removed several Halloween costumes including creepy clown masks and real-life serial killer costumes after parents complained they were too frightening. In this programme, we’ll be discussing whether Halloween is no longer harmless fun, and as usual, we’ll be learning some new vocabulary as well. Sam But before that, and since you’re all dressed up as a ghost, Neil, my question is this – why did people traditionally dress up in costumes on Halloween? Was it: a) to scare their neighbours as a joke b) to use up their old clothes c) to hide from ghosts Neil I think it was to hide from ghosts. Sam OK, Neil. We’ll find out the answer later in the programme. In recent years, Halloween has become more influenced by American horror movies like ‘Friday the Thirteenth’ or ‘Scream’. Some parents now think Halloween costumes are too scary and over the top – a phrase meaning too extreme and unsuitable. Mother of two, Joanne O’Connell, was shocked when she took her 10- year-old daughters shopping for Halloween costumes. Here she explains what she saw to BBC Radio 4 programme, You and Yours Joanne O’Connell They've seen decorations of small children holding a teddy bear covered in blood. They've seen what's described as a standing animated decoration which looks like a dead girl carrying a knife and various Grim Reapers, creepy clowns, and stuff that kids are now finding frightening, and even to an adult, they look pretty vile, actually. And I think it feels like retailers are in some kind of race to the bottom for the grimmest, most vile, sickening outfit so that they can just make money out of. Neil Joanne was horrified by Halloween costumes of the Grim Reaper – an imaginary skeleton who wears a long black cloak, carries a sharp cutting tool and represents Death. She’s worried that costumes like this are too frightening for little children. Sam Nowadays, Halloween is big business and Joanne thinks that the focus on money encourages shops in a race to the bottom, a phrase which describes a situation where companies compete with each other to sell as many products as cheaply as possible. The phrase is connected to the idea of standards getting worse and worse. Neil But come on, Sam! Isn’t this going too far? I mean, Halloween is supposed to be scary! Sam Parents don’t want to stop people having fun, but over the top costumes are too scary for younger children, and some mums say they will no longer open the door to trick-or-treaters because the costumes are giving children nightmares. Siobhan Freegard, founder of the parenting website, Channel Mum, thinks a compromise is needed. Here she is talking to BBC Radio 4’s, You and Yours: Siobhan Freegard There's a sort of a halfway house, isn't there? I mean, I know everyone refers to the new generation as the snowflake generation, and we shouldn't be so worried about our little darlings, but there’s a point beyond which it becomes tasteful or appropriate. Neil Siobhan thinks that scary costumes are okay for teenagers but she also wants to protect younger children. She thinks we need to find a halfway house - a compromise, or arrangement which includes features of two opposing ideas. Sam She also uses the expression the snowflake generation, a phrase which is sometimes used to describe the generation of young people who became adults in or after the 2010s, and who are considered by some to be easily upset and offended. Neil Now I can see how some costumes are over the top and I don’t want to spoil Halloween for anyone, so I’ll stick with my bedsheet ghost. Anyway, isn’t it time for you to reveal the answer to your question, Sam? Sam Yes, I asked why people started dressing up at Halloween in the first place, and you said it was to hide from ghosts, which was… the correct answer! Hundreds of years ago, people thought that ghosts would try to return to their old homes at Halloween. People wore masks so that the ghosts would mistake them for other spirits! Neil OK, let’s recap the vocabulary we’ve learned starting with trick-or-treating, the Halloween tradition of dressing up in creepy costumes and knocking on neighbours’ doors shouting ‘trick or treat’ for sweets and candy. Sam Over the top describes something which is too extreme, unsuitable or unacceptable. Neil The Grim Reaper is an imagined representation of Death and looks like a skeleton in a long, black cloak. Sam A race to the bottom happens when companies compete with each other in order to sell as many products as cheaply as possible. Neil A halfway house is a compromise which includes features of two contrasting ideas. Sam And finally, the snowflake generation is used by some people to refer to the present generation of young people who they think lack resilience and are easily upset. Enjoy Halloween and don’t get too scared! Bye for now. Neil Bye!

Oct 31st
Reply (2)

Zahra Mohammadi21

if it was ur question too.. r u interested in kind of traditions?

Oct 28th
Reply

Mahnaz Khosravi

Woman,life,freedom #mahsaamini

Oct 26th
Reply

Evolution.Science

#MahsaAmini Woman. Life. Freedom.

Oct 25th
Reply

Amir Hosein

چه جوری میتونم متن پادکست و بیینم؟

Oct 24th
Reply

Hossein Pari

perfect

Oct 21st
Reply

Amir Bahadori

"stand's for reason" was new for me. thank you 👍

Oct 21st
Reply

ns ht

Please share the text

Oct 20th
Reply

Shokoofe Hosseini

Note: This is not a word-for-word transcript .Rob: Hello. This is 6 Minute English from BBC Learning English. I’m Rob .Sam: And I’m Sam Rob: Having your photograph appear on the cover of a magazine makes you famous around the world. But imagine if that photo showed you hugging and playing with wild chimpanzees Sam: That’s exactly what happened to Jane Goodall who shot to fame in 1965 when she appeared on the cover of National Geographic magazine. Jane introduced the world to the social and emotional lives of the wild chimpanzees of Gombe, in eastern Tanzania Rob: Jane spent years living among families of wild chimpanzees. Her observations changed the way we view our closest animal relatives – and made us think about what it means to be human Sam: In this programme, we’ll be hearing from the iconic environmentalist Jane Goodall. She reflects on how attitudes have changed as science has uncovered the deep connections between humans and the great apes – large primates including chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans, who are closely related to humans .Rob: And of course we’ll be learning some related vocabulary along the way Sam: As well as Dr Goodall, the National Geographic photographs also made the chimpanzees of Gombe famous. People around the world became interested in the lives of a family of chimps living in a remote corner of Africa Rob: When Gombe’s alpha female died in 1972, she was so well-loved that she had an obituary in The Times newspaper. But what was her name? That’s our quiz question: which chimpanzee’s obituary appeared in The Times? Was it ?,a) Frodo b Flo?, or ?c) Freud .Sam: Well, 1972 is a bit before my time, Rob – I wasn’t even born then, but I think it’s b) Flo Rob: OK, Sam, we’ll find out later if you were right. Now, when Jane first visited Tanzania in the 1960s most scientists believed the only animals capable of making and using tools were humans. But what Jane witnessed about the behaviour of one chimpanzee, who she named Greybeard, turned this idea on its head. Here she recalls that famous day to Jim Al Khalili, for the podcast of BBC Radio 4’s Discovery programme, The Life Scientific Jane Goodall I could see this black hand picking grass stems and pushing them down into the termite mound and pulling them out with termites clinging on with their jaws. And the following day, I saw him pick a leafy twig and strip the leaves, so not only was he using objects as tools but modifying those objects to make tools Rob: Jane observed the chimpanzee, Greybeard, finding small wooden branches called twigs and modifying them – changing them slightly in order to improve them Sam: By stripping away the leaves from twigs and using them to collect ants and termites to eat, Greybeard had madea tool – an instruments or simple piece of equipment, for example a knife or hammer, that you hold in your hands and use for a particular job Rob: Previously, it was believed that animals were incapable of making tools on their own. What Jane saw was proof of the intelligence of wild animals. Jane Goodall’s studies convinced her that chimps experience the same range of emotions as humans, as she explains here to BBC Radio 4’s The Life Scientific Jane Goodall I wasn’t surprised that chimps had these emotions. It was fascinating to realise how many of their gestures are like ours… so you can watch them without knowing anything about them and when they greet with a kiss and embrace, they pat one another in reassurance, they hold hands, they seek physical contact to alleviate nervousness or stress – you know, it’s so like us Sam: Holding hands, embracing and kissing were some of the chimpanzee’s gestures –movements made with hands, arms or head, to express ideas and feelings Rob: In the same way as humans, the chimpanzees would pat each other – touch someone gently and repeatedly with their hand held flat Sam: Much of their behaviour was human-like. Just as I would hug a friend to reassure them, the chimps used physical contact to alleviate stress – make pain or problems less intense or severe. In fact, chimps are so alike us that sometimes they even get their name in the newspaper Rob: Ah yes, Sam, you mean the quiz question I asked you earlier: which chimpanzee had their obituary published in The Times .Sam: And I guessed it was b) Flo !Rob: And that’s absolutely right. Well done, Sam! Give yourself a pat on the back Sam: OK. In this programme, we’ve been hearing about legendary zoologist and activist, Jane Goodall, and her experiences living among great apes – primates like chimpanzees who are humans’ closest animal relatives Rob: Jane witnessed the chimpanzees of Gombe modify – or slightly alter, objects like leaves and twigs to make tools – hand-held instruments used for a particular job Sam: Many of the chimpanzees’ gestures – body movements made to communicate and express emotions – like kissing and patting – touching someone gently and repeatedly with a flat hand – were almost human Rob: And just like us, the chimps sought physical contact to alleviate – or reduce the severity of, nervousness and stress .Sam: That’s all for this programme !Rob: Bye for now !Sam: Bye bye Categories:BBC,

Oct 18th
Reply

Elizabeth Gorgon

The trend for online dating has continued to this day, there is an interesting article about this here https://vipresponse.nl/trends-in-online-dating-in-2022-what-you-should-know/ . I want to note that this helps to immediately learn more information about a person and save your time so as not to once again arrange meetings with a person who has nothing in common with you

Oct 15th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store