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Code Switch

Author: NPR

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What's CODE SWITCH? It's the fearless conversations about race that you've been waiting for! Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between. This podcast makes ALL OF US part of the conversation — because we're all part of the story.
232 Episodes
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An Immune System

An Immune System

2020-07-0821:288

While it's technically possible to win a civil lawsuit against police officers for wrongdoing, there's a reason it almost never happens: a legal technicality called qualified immunity. On this episode, we look at how a law meant to protect Black people from racist violence gave way to a legal doctrine that many people see as the biggest obstacle to police reform.
Every family has a myth about who they are and where they came from. And there are a lot of reasons people tell these stories. Sometimes it's to make your family seem like they were part of an important historical event. Other times, it's to hide something that is too painful to talk about. That last point can be especially true for African American families.
This year, Pride Month intersects with a surge of protests against racism and police brutality. So this week, courtesy of The Nod podcast, we're looking back at the life of Storme DeLarverie — a Black butch woman who didn't pull any punches when it came to protecting her community from violence.
In her new book, The Undocumented Americans, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio writes about delivery men, housekeepers, and day laborers — the undocumented immigrants who are often ignored while the media focuses its attention on Dreamers. "I wanted to learn about them as the weirdos we all are outside of our jobs," she writes.
When the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that DACA could remain in place, recipient Miriam Gonzalez was relieved. As a plaintiff in the case, she's been fighting to keep the program alive since 2017 and we've been following her story. In this bonus episode — an update on Miriam, and why this decision is such a big deal.
Why Now, White People?

Why Now, White People?

2020-06-1729:3028

The video is horrific, and the brutality is stark. But that was the case in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 and Minnesota in 2016. This time, though, white people are out in the streets in big numbers, and books such as "So You Want to Talk About Race" and "How to Be an Antiracist" top the bestseller lists. So we asked some white people: What's different this time?
Suffice it to say, the past few weeks have been a lot to unpack. So today, we're bringing you a special bonus episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. The podcast explores how protests have changed over time, and how certain people's thoughts about race are evolving.
Whenever a protest boils up, it's a safe bet that public officials will quickly blame any violence or disruption on "outside agitators." But what, exactly, does it mean to be an agitator? And can these mysterious outsiders be a force for good?
The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news — stories about the police killing black people. At this point, these calamities feel familiar — so familiar, in fact, that their details have begun to echo each other.
Talking about race can get real heavy, real fast. Listening to music is one way people have been lightening the mood and sorting through their feelings. So this week, we're sharing some of the songs that are giving all of us life during this especially taxing moment.
On March 1, two Los Angeles-based capoeira instructors realized a dream almost 15 years in the making — they opened up their very own gym. Two weeks later, California's stay-at-home order went into effect, and the gym shut its doors. This week, we follow the two of them as they navigate how to keep their dream alive in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.
We take on some of your questions about race, the coronavirus and social distancing. The questions are tricky, and as usual on Code Switch, the reality is even trickier.
The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated issues that disproportionately affect women. So on this episode, we're talking to Mikki Kendall — author of the new book, Hood Feminism — about what on-the-ground feminism practiced by women of color can teach us that the mainstream feminist movement has forgotten.
All month long, we've been answering versions of one giant question: Who counts in 2020? Well, April is poetry month, so we decided to end our series by asking some of our favorite poets who they think counts — and how all of that has changed in these strange, new times.
Many Puerto Ricans grow up being taught that they're a mixture of three races: black, white and indigenous. But on the U.S. census, a majority of Puerto Ricans choose "white" as their only race. On this episode, we're looking into why that is, and the group of people trying to change it.
Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, numbers have been flying at us about the spread of the illness—and then the next minute those same numbers are refuted. This week, we're talking to Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic about why the data is so all over the place, and why that matters, especially for people of color.
Black Like Who?

Black Like Who?

2020-04-1535:0914

It's one of the thorniest questions in any theoretical plan for reparations for black people: Who should get them? On this episode, we dig into some ideas about which black people should and shouldn't receive a payout — which one expert estimates would cost at least $10 trillion.
Many have referred to COVID-19 as a "great equalizer." But the virus has actually exacerbated all sorts of disparities. When it comes to race, black Americans account for a disproportionate number of coronavirus-related deaths in the U.S. In this bonus episode from Slate's "What Next" podcast, reporter Akilah Johnson talks about the many reasons why.
The Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation told his people to stay strong during this pandemic, and to remember how much they've endured over a long history that includes the Trail of Tears. This episode takes a look at the treaty, signed almost 200 years ago, that caused that suffering, and how it's being used now as a call to action.
Right now, the U.S. Census Bureau is trying to count every single person living in the country. It's a complex undertaking with enormous stakes. But some people are very afraid of how that information will be used by the government — especially given how it's been misused in the past. The first in our series about who counts in 2020.
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Comments (96)

Alie Black

An amazing story. Thank you for sharing.

Jul 5th
Reply

Teresa Ellis

Let's list things that were once part of different cultures: bear baiting, dog fights, gladiatorial fights, freak shows, slavery, human sacrifice. Just because it was part of a culture and was a source of income doesn't mean it was a good thing to continue.

Jun 29th
Reply

Accordionbabe

Beautiful. Thank you.

Jun 28th
Reply

bob caygeon

What factors cause a culture to consistently resist arrest and assault police? instead. its easier to promoting the myth of the killer white cop randomly targeting innocent black men who are doing nothing unlawful.

Jun 27th
Reply

Diane Eggert

As a white child who's mom was southern and taught me that people who were not white were to be feared. 50 years later..After watching George Floyd being killed something happened to my core of being a human. shame guilt sadness. I took a deep look inside. Feeling like I've been in a coma. I was blind but now I see. I'm sorry. #BlackLivesMatter

Jun 22nd
Reply

ID18470784

This podcast is garbage liberal trash fake news fake racism so sad you play the victim

Jun 19th
Reply

Samo Lantigua

just wanted to say I happen to enjoy your podcast thank you for such awesome and timely content. one of the reasons I believe there are more white people involved and black lives matter is because for once they were stuck in one place, and couldn't be distracted buy work and their own social lives. covid-19 put them in a place where they have to see it and even if they turned away they would find themselves drawn back by the social media overload. People are sheep and often go with what the norm is. it's sad that a virus how to beat the thing the people down and say "look see what is happening". for a lot of white people this is just a hobby or something to do. we watch movies of victorious revolutions and see the forefathers of our past and how they overthrew the government by starting rampaging riots. but it seems like all people are doing is talking about the problem with no solution in sight......

Jun 19th
Reply (2)

amir imanpour

enjoyed

Jun 18th
Reply

amir imanpour

👍

Jun 6th
Reply

Aaron H

What happens when you realize we are the same race? All people are the same race. All humans. All Homo Sapiens

Jun 2nd
Reply

Lia Thomas

great conversations about identify

May 29th
Reply

BC

what the fuck. the land is radioactive?

May 17th
Reply

BC

The ending was excellent.

Apr 19th
Reply

John Buckner

Very, very good podcast that raises so many questions. Please do many more episodes on this topic, and I look forward to hearing more from Professors Derity and Hamilton.

Apr 17th
Reply

Lore Star

REMEMBER MOST OF USA WAS MEXICO B4 IT WAS USA. MEXICAN AMERICANS WITH SONORAN DESERT INDIGENOUS ANCESTORS NEVER HAVE LEFT OUR MOTHER LAND AND WE WERE ACTUALLY HERE B4 THESE LANDS BECAME NEW SPAIN OR MEXICO THEN USA THAN SUDDENLY A BORDER CROSSED US WE NEVER CROSSED BORDERS FOR THOUSANDS OF YRS NEVER EXISTED! LEARN REAL NRTH AME. HISTORY NOT DISNEY FAIRYTALES TAUGHT TO ALL IN USA EDUCATION SYSTEM.

Apr 2nd
Reply (1)

sirenasd

Glad that teachers Unions see common cause with undeserved poor commuities today. Unfortunately it took a lot of this, and only several years ago that black and brown parents and ACLU sued LAUSD over union seniority rules that leave their schools with less experienced and more short term substitutes. Disheartening to hear union president defend it and disregard the parents out of hand. But he was ousted by progressive teachers. But everyone should hear this story of community empowerment and parents organizing in education.

Mar 9th
Reply

Shanaya Painter

God. This breaks my fucking heart.How could people be so evil?

Mar 4th
Reply

Lori

Pout of curiosity have y'all spoken to Rev Barber regarding the #PoorPeoplesCampaign?

Mar 3rd
Reply

BC

I never heard about this before.

Feb 28th
Reply

John Buckner

Very informative and helpful. It puts things in a much better historical context so that the present makes much more sense.

Feb 21st
Reply
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