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Consider This from NPR

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Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
869 Episodes
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The Memphis Police Department has disbanded its special SCORPION unit, after five of the unit's officers were involved in the death of Tyre Nichols. But similar units are still operating across the U.S.Specialized police units are often created after a spike in crime, as officials come under pressure to do something about it. The units often operate with little oversight and develop a reputation for using aggressive tactics.We speak with journalist Radley Balko, author of "Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America's Police Forces." He has studied police tactics and whether special units work to keep communities safe.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Pamela Anderson has had an incredibly rich, and varied, career. She's an actress, the author of several books, and a prominent activist - especially for animal rights.But many people still see her primarily as a sex symbol, the archetypal "blonde bombshell."In a new memoir titled "Love, Pamela", Anderson takes control of the narrative, telling her story in her own words.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Signs of a forthcoming recession seem to be everywhere: from grocery stores, where food prices are soaring, to Fortune 500 companies, where workers are being let go by the thousand.Survey after survey shows fears of recession are high. And if one does come, navigating the downturn can be tricky.NPR's Arezou Rezvani shares advice from economists and personal finance experts on how to prepare for a potential recession.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
While some countries are seeing their populations decline and grow older, others are growing fast. That has economic implications. Could migration help?NPR's Emily Feng reports on the long term consequences of China's shrinking population.We also hear from Lant Pritchett, research director with the think tank Labor Mobility Partnerships, about the ways in which migration could help tackle population imbalances. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Americans have grown accustomed to hearing about the latest mass shooting. And recently news coverage has been focused on two tragic events in California — Last weekend eleven people were killed and nine injured in Monterey Park near Los Angeles. And on Monday, seven people were killed and one wounded in Half Moon Bay, just south of San Francisco.In the past 72 hours alone, seventy-one people were killed and 114 were injured by shootings in different incidents all across the country - including another mass shooting this morning near Los Angeles. Three people were killed and four were injured. Beyond getting the facts right, which is crucial, news outlets put careful thought into how best to cover these stories. But as gun violence continues to rise, is it time for the media to rethink their approach? NPR's Michel Martin talks to Nick Wilson, the senior director for Gun Violence Prevention at the Center for American Progress. And Dr. Jessica Beard from Philadelphia Center For Gun Violence Reporting discusses ways the media can avoid retraumatizing survivors of gun violence.
Five police officers have been charged with murder and other crimes in the wake of Tyre Nichols' death this month in Memphis. Nichols, who was Black, died after a traffic stop. All five of the officers facing charges are Black.Since the deaths of George Floyd in 2020 and so many others, many police departments have vowed to diversify their forces as a way to help end police brutality and racism within their ranks. But does diversity in a police force make a difference? And what more can be done to reduce police violence?We speak with Phillip Goff of the Center for Policing Equity about how the Tyre Nichols case speaks to larger issues with police department culture and diversity.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Maya Moore stepped away from her stellar basketball career to help free Jonathan Irons, a man who was incarcerated for over two decades on a wrongful conviction.With the help of Moore and her family, Irons was exonerated and released from prison in 2020.Over the course of working on his case, Moore and Irons developed a friendship that turned into love and the pair got married shortly after Irons was freed from prison.This month, Moore officially retired from basketball to focus on her new family with Irons.We speak with Moore and Irons about their journey together. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
For months, Ukraine pressed western allies for state-of-the-art tanks. For months, Germany and the U.S. resisted. That changed Wednesday.Both countries have now promised to send tanks to Ukraine. The German-made Leopard II and American-made Abrams tanks are considered the best in the world.NPR's Rob Schmitz in Berlin and Greg Myre in Washington explain how Ukraine's allies changed their minds.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Since the Supreme Court ended the constitutional right to an abortion, some Muslims in America have sought a better understanding of what their faith says about abortion.NPR's Linah Mohammad reports on the diversity of views within Islam about the issue.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The people of Monterey Park, California, would normally be celebrating Lunar New Year right now, one of the biggest holidays of the year in a community that is two-thirds Asian. Instead, the city is mourning a terrible loss.Ailsa Chang went to the site of Saturday night's mass shooting in Monterey Park to speak to people there about the tragedy's impact on their community, which is often described as the "first suburban Chinatown" in America.We also hear from Min Zhou, a professor of sociology and Asian American studies at UCLA, about Monterey Park's history and significance as a safe space for Asians and Asian Americans.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Admit it - you've fantasized about what you would do if you hit the lottery and exactly how you would spend your millions - or billions. Spending a few dollars for a chance at a massive jackpot seems irresistible. Roughly half of all Americans buy at least one lottery ticket per year, despite the nearly impossible odds of winning. But some people take it much further. Unlike casino games and sports betting, messaging around playing the lottery can make it seem much less like actual gambling and more like a fun way to chase a dream of luxury and wealth.But some critics feel that the lottery uses predatory practices to disproportionately target low-income communities and people of color. Host Michel Martin talks to Jonathan D. Cohen, author of For a Dollar and a Dream: State Lotteries In Modern America. NPR reporter Jonathan Franklin contributed to this episode.
In China, huge numbers of people are expected to travel and gather with family this weekend for the start of the Lunar New Year, just as the country experiences a major surge in COVID infections. NPR's Emily Feng reports that the holiday may be bittersweet for some. We also hear reporting from NPR's Wynne Davis, who collected recipes to help ring in the Lunar New Year.And in Ukraine, many Orthodox Christians marked the feast of the Epiphany on Thursday by plunging into the frigid waters of the Dnipro River. NPR's Elissa Nadworny talked to some of the brave swimmers, who said that this year the ritual felt like a needed respite from the ongoing war.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The Justice Department is investigating the mishandling of classified documents linked to President Biden and to his predecessor, former President Trump. Both cases raise questions about how classified information should be handled.NPR's Greg Myre explains how classified material is handled at the White House, and how that compares to other government agencies. And we speak to Yale law professor and former special counsel at the Pentagon Oona Hathaway, about the issue of "overclassification" of documents.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The U.S. will hit its borrowing limit on Thursday, according to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, and her department will need to take "extraordinary measures" to avoid default.That means the clock is ticking for Congress to take action to raise the debt ceiling. For the moment, though, Democrats and Republicans are in a staring match.House Republicans say they won't raise the limit without significant spending cuts. The White House says it won't negotiate over it.Juana Summers talks with two people who've been here before: Jason Furman, who was an economic advisor to then-President Obama during the 2011 debt ceiling stalemate, and Rohit Kumar, who was then a top aide to Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
If you could change one thing in your life to become a happier person — like your income, a job, your relationships or your health — what would make the biggest difference? That's the question Harvard psychiatrist Dr. Robert Waldinger has been attempting to answer through decades of research. He's the director of "the world's longest-running scientific study of happiness," and he spoke with Ari Shapiro about the factor that appears to make the biggest difference in people's lives. Waldinger is a co-author of The Good Life: Lessons from the world's longest scientific study of happiness.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The soccer world was shocked by the death of renowned U.S. soccer journalist Grant Wahl at the World Cup in Qatar. Then came the conspiracy theories claiming his death was caused by the COVID vaccine.Wahl died from an aortic aneurysm. His wife, epidemiologist Dr. Céline Gounder, gave multiple interviews and released Wahl's autopsy results to combat the disinformation.We ask Gounder about her decision to speak out about her husband's death, and about his legacy.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The start of a new year can push us to think about how we take care of ourselves – our bodies or our minds. And for some people that can mean seeking help for mental health issues like depression and anxiety. In some ways, being open about pursuing treatment for mental health concerns is becoming more commonplace. But for men who are socialized not to express vulnerability and keep emotions in check, seeking therapy may feel taboo. Black men must also contend with the long history of neglect and abuse that has influenced how generations of African-Americans feel about health services, a lack of Black mental health professionals, and the understanding that shielding emotions are a way to face the pressures and dangers of racism. Host Michel Martins talks with writer Damon Young, author of What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays, and psychologist Earl Turner of Pepperdine University, on making therapy more accessible for Black men.
This is a pivotal moment in the war in Ukraine. Ukrainian forces continue to have the upper hand on the battlefield, but there are real questions about what comes next and what an acceptable end to this war could look like.Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmyrto Kuleba provides his assessment on the state of the war and the path ahead.And former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice argues for a dramatic increase in military aid to Ukraine.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
People sometimes object when Aubrey Gordon describes herself as fat. It's not that they're disputing her size, she says. Rather, they're acting out on their assumptions about what it means to be a fat person. Gordon is the author of "'You Just Need To Lose Weight' and 19 other Myths about Fat People." In the book, she explores and debunks pervasive societal myths about fat people. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Destructive flooding caused by torrential rains has created a deadly disaster in California. The death toll rivals the worst wildfires and points to a common cause for both: drought. Brian Ferguson with California's Office of Emergency Services explains how a "weather whiplash" of dry years followed by heavy rain and snow can lead to dangerous outcomes. And NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on how officials are hoping to store more storm water as a way to prevent future floods and fight the ongoing drought. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Comments (155)

it

I can't believe the fact that the Brazilian ex-president Bolso had decreed a 100 secrecy that is currently being revised and of actually suspended is expected to allow for uncovering and proof of a lot of serious illegal activities that have caused great harm to the world and for which Bolson and his accomplices must respond with reparations. It seems clear that this was one of the reasons why he left before his immunity expired!

Jan 11th
Reply (1)

Al McGeary

A professor of hip hop. Has the world come to this ? Too bad that the benefits of the industrial revolution are just tossed about for riff raff to use.

Nov 11th
Reply (1)

Al McGeary

Who cares ?

Nov 11th
Reply

Mar Q

U fuckers want to make Saudi Arabia like Iraq

Oct 19th
Reply

Ramineh Medhat

#mahsaamini please be an iranian women voice

Sep 28th
Reply

Hyacinth Brown

Your best is in display. A complete turn off!

Aug 10th
Reply

Amaya Bryant

village California that has to obviously get them is it our tax records and the night vets tax and I'm the regular and my music and I could do have a good chords and that sadly and like and I will do community because a marriage stop and I work with our course and I'm there and I am of course and I'm go to the sorry and like pork chili sorry and like cops and a niggity it is after her it does come out of that Sonic according like coming home tonight I'm going to stand honestly is secondly and Ashley they like do that actually and like back up for hers and like basically and I not do anything be honestly to you give you everything because you do correction tell you and a great part in a question hope breaks right and it's I guess it is Grayson and it's just like a great Bernard this after toilet is connected Amber is on my desk this fake marriage in this who call who called marriage NFL marriage and I fake marriage and this side exactly really knows at this ethernet and a dude in the scapula and you get her such a baby he giving her the hustlers and a human being others because mask on home because homeless do great for her it is sick days on the in the artist in the latest sub and then I've been talking matter and I'm saying Kevin home and I gifted to you at least come beat up that Alice Richard after command from that Jessica and beat up and be argue and like this argument treatment like the ladies do and like that gets a manager and then monitor is America this is a convex the temperature drama I like such an app in the family car this is an Anacortes and a the cover on if you exactly this afternoon if you have to decide how many after I was so scared what a big deal Charlie Wilson and Bruno Mars do you know the f*** is she but the f*** is she you do how do you have sex and do I have a baby and marriage and married but the f*** are you I said what the f*** you doing here this time around is it Connecticut I just kick your ass out kick your ass out and I punched your ass by here and not still my man seriously all you serious you're August Cisco the commitment for me and you do not come out for her belly did not steal my man after not kill your f****** ass after my mailing is is my kids baby is my husband took care of baby you do stay all my life get artist stay out my parody of it

Aug 5th
Reply (2)

mari arana

This whole episode gave me chills. Unfuckinbelievable!

Aug 3rd
Reply

Hyacinth Brown

What criminal charges if any can be brought to a person with cognitive decline prior to taking the position of Pregnancy, and up to four years later?

Jul 24th
Reply

Elizabeth Burns

Pro-life ideology is a sick joke.

Jul 3rd
Reply

mari arana

My goodness! I'm so glad I'm not a parent or teacher or young person in the school system these days.

Mar 12th
Reply

Ryan Dunn

My daughter wanted to be a mermaid when she was 7. I guess I should have taken her seriously

Mar 11th
Reply

ToliG

Im from Kosovo and was born when Miloshevich set the same pretext. Ethnic cleansing means genocide as well as war crimes. The difference here is that Putin has nukes and can spark a World War, everyone should be afraid of what comes next regardless of where you live.

Feb 23rd
Reply

it

such important subject... brings up a lot!

Jan 26th
Reply

C muir

fuelling it? fbi entrapment

Jan 18th
Reply

Zeeshan Muhammad

This really highlights that the US is a third world country wearing a Gucci belt. What's the point of paying your federal and individual state taxes if not to allow the government to protect and serve its citizenry with resources it needs in the middle of a world wide pandemic? The mind boggles why Americans are seemingly okay with such low effort from their elected officials. We would have riots and effective worker strikes if any European elected official dared to behave in such a lowly fashion.

Dec 14th
Reply

alli lent

one step towards Gilead.. also stop calling yourself "Pro Life" if you're also anti vax, pro gun, pro death penalty, and anti anything that could help these unwilling mothers after the baby is born. you are not pro life, you are pro fetus.

Dec 2nd
Reply

alli lent

seems like this Travis Scott guy is pretty popular.. never heard of him before this whole thing..

Nov 12th
Reply (1)

James Pruitt

answer: No.

Nov 10th
Reply

squogg

Yes Audie! Thank you for pushing back and asking tough questions to Vishal.

Nov 10th
Reply
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