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Doha Debates Podcast

Doha Debates Podcast

Author: Doha Debates

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A biweekly debate show that bridges the divide across contentious issues. Every two weeks, Doha Debates and FP Studios bring you an important and topical debate on the world’s most pressing issues. The show brings together people with starkly different opinions for an in-depth, human conversation that looks for common ground. Each show also includes young guest voices, often participants of the Doha Debates Ambassador Program, who ask insightful questions of the guests. Show hosts include Karen Given, Afia Pokua, Mariya Karimjee, Joshua Johnson and others.

64 Episodes
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This week, we’re airing one of our favorite past episodes. This debate is spirited, informative and centered on a question that remains intensely relevant: Is it time to ban gasoline-powered vehicles?  Climate activist and author Aakash Ranison says that while electric vehicles may not be a silver-bullet solution to climate change, they are an important and urgent step in the right direction. On the other side, journalist Jonathan Miltimore argues that there are actually lots of drawbacks and hidden costs to producing electric cars. Gas-powered vehicles, he says, are simply too important—to our individual lives and to the health of our economies—to ban outright, arguing that we should instead focus our time and efforts on other ways of combating climate change. Listen to Doha Debates Podcast as they debate the efficiency, affordability and viability of eliminating gas-powered vehicles, and what the future of climate change might hold. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Karen Given. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Let's face it. Artificial intelligence is everywhere around us—on our phones, in our homes, in our cars and in our schools. But that doesn't mean that we all have equal access to the best and most helpful learning technologies. As AI continues to develop and get smarter, how can we ensure universal access to these educational technologies so that all students can benefit?  Nadeem Nathoo, co-founder of The Knowledge Society, argues that the private sector would be the most effective at getting cutting-edge AI technologies into the hands of students, saying that a direct-to-user approach is the most realistic and reliable. Isabelle Hau, executive director of the Stanford Accelerator for Learning, says it’s imperative for educators to be involved in the development and dissemination of artificial intelligence in schools. She argues that while AI in classrooms can be a great equalizer, without proper oversight, there's a risk that AI could deepen inequalities between students. Louka Parry, CEO and founder of The Learning Future, says we must look at education and learning more holistically. While he agrees that AI presents a lot of opportunity for learners across the world, he reminds us that an important part of learning is cultivating curiosity in a social setting and that AI tools could potentially isolate students and deepen intellectual divides. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these three education experts debate the best ways to incorporate and leverage AI in the classroom. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates. This episode is hosted by Rawaa Augé and was filmed live at the WISE Summit in Doha, Qatar, in November 2023. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Do you live to work, or work to live? The World Happiness Report says that factors such as social support, economic security and work-life balance all contribute to life satisfaction and overall fulfillment. But checking all those boxes is easier said than done. Can we work hard toward our professional goals without sacrificing other parts of our lives? Jennifer Moss, a speaker and strategist on work-life balance whose latest book tackles employee burnout,  says it’s paramount for our happiness and health that we don’t overwork ourselves. She says that instead, we should focus on striking a balance in our lives. While she agrees that deriving fulfillment from work can be rewarding, she argues that hustle culture can be a slippery slope to burnout. Chris Guillebeau, author, entrepreneur and host of the podcast Side Hustle School, says that work-life balance is a conspiracy made up by corporations to monopolize our time and energy. Instead, he argues that to achieve happiness in the long term, people should work hard to pursue projects they really care about, even if it’s sometimes at the expense of other parts of our lives. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these two experts debate the merits of hustle culture and explore the best ways to find happiness in and outside the workplace. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Karen Given. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Since its inception in 1945, the United Nations has committed to preventing world wars. However, recent and devastating conflicts, like the wars in Gaza, Ukraine and elsewhere, have brought the UN's shortcomings on this front into high relief. Is the United Nations capable of preventing war and keeping the peace, or is the institution too antiquated to resolve modern conflicts? Anjali K. Dayal, political scientist at Fordham University, argues that the UN is in need of a major structural overhaul. She says that the UN is operating exactly as it was designed to, with the UN’s systematic flaws helping nations like the United States and Russia retain their power and protect their interests. Natalie Samarasinghe, global advocacy director of the Open Society Foundation, concedes that while the UN isn’t perfect, the organization remains a vital and irreplaceable lifeline for people in conflict zones around the world. Moreover, she says that the UN cannot and should not be all things to all people—instead, we must focus on and invest in the parts of the UN that do work. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these experts debate the best paths toward peace, the future of the UN, the rising role of youth on the global stage and how we should hold the UN to account. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
The maestro of mediation

The maestro of mediation

2023-12-2649:442

This week on the Doha Debates Podcast, we’re thrilled to share an episode from one of our other podcasts, The Negotiators.  William Ury is one of the most famous negotiation experts in the world. He co-wrote the classic book Getting to Yes and co-founded Harvard’s program on negotiation. In this episode, Ury shares negotiation advice and stories from famous peace talks in conversation with host Jenn Williams. The Negotiators brings you stories from people resolving some of the world’s most dramatic conflicts. It is a partnership between Doha Debates and Foreign Policy. Season 3 is out now, so if you enjoyed this episode, check out the full show and follow wherever you get your podcasts: https://link.chtbl.com/TheNegotiators
What does a shift in the balance of power mean for the world? For much of the last 100 years, Western countries have dominated the global order. But now, with many nations vying for power, new regional partnerships and middle powers are on the rise. Economically, strategic alliances like BRICS are bolstering the influence of non-Western countries. And in a world that’s more digitally connected than ever, the global rise of pop culture heavyweights like Bollywood, dizi and K-pop means there’s more soft power in the hands of countries outside the historical superpowers. At the same time, conflict is on the rise globally. Earlier this year, the UN said there are more ongoing conflicts than at any point since World War II. Now, more than ever, it’s crucial to think about who should lead. Join us, along with students, recent graduates and expert speakers—Jon B. Alterman, Sawsan Chebli and Wadah Khanfar—for a town hall event that breaks down today’s most urgent issues, examines the impact of shifting global powers and answers the question: Who should lead in a multipolar world? This Doha Debates town hall was moderated by journalist Femi Oke and produced in partnership with Doha Forum. It was filmed at Qatar National Library in Doha, Qatar on December 9, 2023.
How much influence can a 19th century European art movement really have on the modern Arab world? Orientalism, an aesthetic movement depicting the East by Western artists, was for some the only exposure to Middle Eastern and Asian cultures. Some, like Palestinian American scholar Edward Said, said that Orientalism pervades Western art, pop culture and journalism even today, revealing the same stereotypes of Arab cultures that were popularized some 200 years ago. Others argue that its influence—and even those stereotypes—requires a more nuanced interpretation. From the roots of Orientalism to the role of museums in displaying Orientalist art, join students, recent graduates and speakers—curator Kholood Al-Fahad, author Fatima Bhutto and journalist Inaya Folarin Iman—as they deconstruct Orientalist narratives, the value of inclusion and the lasting impact of art.  This Doha Debates town hall was moderated by Dena Takruri, senior presenter and producer with AJ+, and produced in partnership with VCUArts Qatar and Lusail Museum.
Generative AI has changed the way that some students approach their schoolwork. What does it mean for the state of education when students can ask ChatGPT to write an essay or solve a math problem? Artificial intelligence is causing parents to worry, and governments are struggling to keep up with this rapidly advancing technology. Are there beneficial uses of AI in classrooms, or will it do more harm than good? Sal Khan, founder of Khan Academy, says AI should be used as a support tool for teachers and students, saying that it can help students learn how to ask the right questions and provide personalized attention to supplement their traditional education. Khan Academy’s own AI tool, Khanmigo, was developed as a tutor that teaches problem solving instead of giving students the answers. On the other hand, Jacob Ward, author and science journalist, says that there are broader issues of economics at play. He argues that AI is often used for efficiency and cost cutting, making classrooms more bureaucratic and students less interested and equipped to learn. He also says it’s not yet clear if AI will help level the playing field in underdeveloped countries and communities or if unequal technological progress will create more imbalance. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as they debate the future of AI in education and what it means for progress. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments. Want to dive deeper into this topic? Join Doha Debates at the WISE Summit on November 28. Learn more: https://www.wise-qatar.org/
Facial recognition software. CCTV cameras. License plate readers. Wiretapping. These are all ways that governments employ mass surveillance. Supporters of surveillance technology say these tools are necessary to keep everyone safe. But opponents raise concerns over privacy and human rights abuses. Where do we draw the line? How do we balance individual privacy and collective safety?  Cindy Cohn, executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says our privacy rights are being violated. She cites mass surveillance as yet another example of government overreach and says that it disproportionately targets vulnerable populations, especially people of color. Jamil Jaffer, executive director of the National Security Institute, says that the great majority of people have nothing to worry about, as just a relative few individuals end up on government watch lists. He argues that government surveillance is crucial to our safety and that, at least in the United States, it is much more targeted than people may realize. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these two experts debate liberty, safety, consent and the limits of the law and anonymity in a world with mass surveillance.  Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
If you could prevent your future child from having a life-threatening disease, would you do it? What if you could prevent addictions or the development of bad habits before they were even born? What if you could genetically engineer your child to be taller, or if you could select their eye color or even their sex? How much of this would you be OK with—and which of these things give you “the ick”?  Joyce Harper, professor of reproductive science at University College London, says genetic engineering is a slippery slope that raises a lot of moral and ethical questions. She argues that just because we can do these things, doesn't mean that we necessarily should. She says that gene editing could deepen class and cultural divides, especially if only the wealthy few can access and afford the technology. Sarah Chan, chancellor's fellow in ethics at University of Edinburgh, agrees that while there is some risk with genetic engineering, there are also risks if we don’t pursue it. She argues that gene editing has the power to create a more just and healthy society. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as they debate the promises and pitfalls of genetic engineering—is this technology our future, or should it remain science fiction? Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Has the US peaked? For much of the 20th century, the United States of America led the world economically, militarily and even culturally. But is its influence and power now in decline, and what would that mean for the rest of the world? Lavina Lee, senior lecturer at Macquarie University in Australia, says that the US still has an important and powerful global role, despite the recent growth of other superpowers like China. Richard Heydarian, senior lecturer at University of the Philippines, says we’re already on a path to a post-American world, and that the US relies on its relationships with other countries as much as they rely on the US. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as our guests debate the role of the US in a changing, multipolar world. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Jenn Williams. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments. Listen to The Negotiators, another podcast by Doha Debates, hosted by Jenn Williams: https://link.chtbl.com/TheNegotiators
Ken ventured out into the “real world” from Barbieland and returned with a new definition of masculinity. Andrew Tate’s influence on teen boys has amplified conversations about the “manosphere.” People around the world are eager for new rules for being a man—why? Men are struggling. That’s what Richard Reeves, president of the American Institute for Boys and Men, contends, pointing to the widespread mental health crisis men and boys are facing in developed countries, as suicide rates rise. Meanwhile, higher education enrollment for men is lower than ever, and historically male-dominated jobs like manufacturing and farming are disappearing. Reeves says we must acknowledge these problems in order to solve them, but maintains that helping men does not and should not come at the expense of women. Dr. Barbara Risman, editor in chief of "Gender & Society," says that we're not grappling with a crisis of masculinity, but rather a socio-economic crisis that's hurting working-class women and men—especially men of color. To fix this, she says we must create more economic support for these men, be it in jobs or education, and update our ideas of traditional gender roles. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as our guests debate what the future of masculinity should look like and how to help men and boys without getting trapped in the manosphere.  Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
It can write emails, essays and even songs. It has created award-winning pieces of art, and it’s one reason that Hollywood is on strike. That’s right—today’s podcast episode is about artificial intelligence. Generative AI programs such as ChatGPT, DALL-E and Midjourney are worrying artists of all kinds about the future of art. Is AI coming for artists’ jobs and livelihood, or is it a helpful tool pushing art to a new horizon? Jason Allen used generative AI to create his work “Théâtre d'Opéra Spatial,” which won the Colorado State Fair’s annual fine art competition in 2022, making news headlines. He says artists should be excited and more open to working with AI as a new artistic medium that can help break down barriers and democratize art for everyone. On the other side, Molly Crabapple, award-winning artist and writer, says artists—and everyone—should be concerned about generative AI, arguing that these programs are not only stealing from, but “sucking the lifeblood,” from living artists. Additionally, she contends that the limited creativity of AI art programs will ultimately impoverish human culture. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as our guests debate the controversy surrounding AI art, the economics of artificial intelligence and the future of art around the world. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Joshua Johnson. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
This week, enjoy a special episode from our friends at Foreign Policy Magazine from their podcast FP Live. Has China peaked? After decades of record economic growth, China’s economy is showing signs of a slowdown. In the world’s second-largest economy, recent numbers show a reduced rate of growth. Michael Beckley, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and popularizer of the term “peak China,” argues that China’s rise is not as inevitable as it once was. Keyu Jin, a tenured professor at the London School of Economics, says that while China has its issues, theories about its decline are often wrong. Joining Foreign Policy’s Ravi Agrawal, they debate the possibilities of China’s economic future. The Doha Debates Podcast returns with a new debate in two weeks.
Do you think it’s OK to sacrifice a mouse’s life to cure a disease? What if it were a monkey? A cow? Or a dog? For a long time, research on animals has been a crucial component of scientific and medical innovation. Testing on animals has led to the development of the world's first vaccine. And drugs used to combat cancer, malaria and HIV/AIDS and many other illnesses would not have been possible without animal research. But today, with all of our technological advancements, is animal testing necessary—or unnecessarily cruel?  Dr. Katherine Roe, Chief of the Science Advancement and Outreach division at PETA, argues that not only is animal testing cruel, but she contends that the significant species differences between humans and other animals limit the usefulness of animal research. Instead, Dr. Roe says that we should be investing more time and money into alternatives to animal testing, like computer modeling, non-invasive diagnostic imaging, stem cell research, and more human-centric clinical research. On the other side is Dr. Juan Carlos G. Marvizón, a retired UCLA neuroscientist who spent his career researching the causes and cures of chronic pain. He argues that animals are a valuable—and for now, irreplaceable—part of the scientific process and says that animal research not only helps save lives and lead to huge scientific breakthroughs—like the rapid development of the COVID-19 vaccine—but it also helps us better understand humanity and the world. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these two scientists debate the ethics of animal testing.  Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Mariya Karimjee. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Is it time to cancel the debts of low-income countries in the global south? It’s estimated that three out of five low-income countries are struggling to pay their debts. In Africa, 21 countries are either bankrupt or in financial distress, and are on the hook to repay more than $70 billion in 2023 alone. Freeing up this money could help these countries get back on their feet and invest more at home—but it’s not without its drawbacks. Heidi Chow, executive director of the UK-based nonprofit Debt Justice, says debt relief is needed. She argues that debt payments shouldn’t come before essential human needs, and that rather than tightening the screws on indebted countries, we should address the predatory lending practices that have pushed many global south countries to the brink of collapse. Bright Simons, policy analyst at the Ghana-based Imani Center for Policy and Education, contends that blanket debt cancellation doesn’t benefit anybody, saying that some countries have successfully paid back their debts while others have spent recklessly. And, he argues, domestic lenders and private investors shouldn’t have to pay the price for governments’ poor financial decisions. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as they debate how to best address Africa’s debt crisis.  Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Nazanine Moshiri. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Is it time to ban gasoline-powered vehicles?  Climate activist and author Aakash Ranison says that while electric vehicles may not be a silver-bullet solution to climate change, they are an important and urgent step in the right direction. On the other side, journalist Jonathan Miltimore argues that there are actually lots of drawbacks and hidden costs to producing electric cars. Gas-powered vehicles, he says, are simply too important—to our individual lives and to the health of our economies—to ban outright, arguing that we should instead focus our time and efforts on other ways of combating climate change. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as they debate the efficiency, affordability and viability of eliminating gas-powered vehicles, and what the future of climate change might hold.. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Karen Given. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
Are some sports too violent for children? Kids and teens who play full- or high-contact sports like rugby, American football and mixed martial arts have higher rates of concussions, which can lead to traumatic brain injuries. On the flip side, there are also huge benefits to playing sports when you’re young, including community and confidence.  Dr. Bennet Omalu, a pioneer in understanding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), says that children should not be allowed to play certain sports, and argues instead that we should invent new, safer sports for kids. Babalwa Latsha, Africa’s first female professional rugby player, contends that existing sports can and should be modified to be safer for children, and holds that participating in sports is a great way to learn valuable life skills. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as they discuss the different possibilities for children and sports.  Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Karen Given. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
About 1.5 billion people in the world eat a plant-based diet. For most of them, it’s a necessity, because meat is either too expensive or unavailable. But about 75 million people choose to go vegetarian for reasons like animal welfare and personal health. Some meat-eaters counter that humans have evolved to eat meat, and that animals can be raised and slaughtered humanely. Doha Debates asks: Is choosing to eat meat is an act of cruelty, and what do humans and animals stand to gain or lose from continuing the practice? To debate this, we are joined by food blogger and meat-eater Humzah Ghauri, and Ghanaian musician and proud vegan Okyeame Kwame.
Who does art belong to? Where should it live? And how can—or should—it be shared with the world? These are some of the questions at the heart of this week's debate. Recently, museums like the Smithsonian in the US and the Horniman Museum and Gardens in the UK have made headlines by returning stolen and disputed artifacts to Nigeria, the country they were taken from centuries ago. Should more museums be doing this? And if so, what should that repatriation look like? Chidi Nwaubani, founder of digital art repatriation site Looty, says much of the damage is done and that we should focus on decolonizing our future. He proposes using technology like NFTs to digitally loot the stolen artwork and restore ownership. Tristram Hunt, director of the Victoria and Albert Museum in the UK, debates that artifacts in museums are valuable tools of education and cultural diffusion. Rather than returning all disputed artifacts, he says that we should find a more equitable way to house art in museums in both the global north and global south. Sofia Carreira-Wham, a curator and art advisor, says we must look beyond the museum walls and find meaningful ways to restore wider cultural benefits to the people and communities whose art has been taken from them. Listen to the Doha Debates Podcast as these guests dissect questions about ownership, reparations, colonial legacy, looting and who has the right to care for the world's treasures. Doha Debates Podcast is a production of Doha Debates and FP Studios. This episode is hosted by Afia Pokua. Thoughts on this conversation? Let us know! Follow us everywhere @DohaDebates and join the post-episode discussion in our YouTube comments.
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Comments (66)

Daniel LaRiviere

kiss my ass, electric cars are a complete scam and producing them causes more carbon than gas cars. there is not enough grid power for them, the range and charging time are ridiculous AND the batteries fail when it is cold.

Feb 20th
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Sonu Kumar

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Dec 23rd
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Donald Sidhu

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Nov 29th
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Shakti Mehra

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Nov 21st
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Dana Pellegrino

sorry but John was kinda a d**k. He interrupted Aakash in the beginning before Aakash finished talking, pretty much told the one young girl concerned about her homeland "tough luck" (but then later tried to advocate for other people's well-being), and then didn't even have anything nice to say at the end! He was honestly a terrible guest. I wish they had picked someone else in his place.

Jul 30th
Reply

Ishmael

This all has been debunked. The entitled US women's soccer team wanted to be paid the same as the men and still keep their female privilege with health insurance, paid time off and other benefits. Female soccer doesn't even make half of the revenue that men's soccer does, so getting paid the same is out of the question.

May 13th
Reply

Ishmael

Feminists want secularism but when they're in a secular society (France) they want Muslims to be able to wear the hijab and burka. Complete cognitive dissonance. 🤦 The host is a Leftwing propagandist.

May 13th
Reply (26)

Ishmael

The cognitive dissonance in this episode is glaring! You can't claim to be a Muslim and a feminist as the first blatantly restricts women and the latter calls for absolutely no restrictions on women. France is not a Muslim country so Muslims have to adhere to their laws.

May 13th
Reply

Petko Draganov

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Apr 12th
Reply

Ishmael

As soon as the Palestinian guy brought up the propagandist and fraudsters BLM I knew where this conversation was going. When you say that violence is subjective by using the "oppressed" and "oppresser" you have fallen into the Marxist idiology which is seen in leftist movements BLM, CRT, LGBT, etc. This conversation is useless because it does not address the fact that Palestinians have no right to the land of Israel.

Apr 11th
Reply

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Aug 15th
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Dana Pellegrino

Supporting cancel culture is extremely problematic. People who have good intentions and want to use it for good just completely ignore the fact that most people only use it as an excuse to be mean, horrible people who send threats to other people and feel powerful behind a screen because they have nothing better to do and want to feel important. Cancel culture is not good and needs to be replaced with something that actually works.

Aug 8th
Reply (1)
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