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Author: The Economist

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Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance — as well as science and technology.

 



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1460 Episodes
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After decades as a scientific also-ran, China is becoming a superpower particularly in the physical sciences. We examine the risks and opportunities that poses for the West. Our correspondent looks into why denizens of the Mediterranean live so long (10.32). And this year’s confluence of two broods makes for a rare preponderance of cicadas (17.53).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Since his election last year, President Javier Milei has enjoyed some economic and political wins in Argentina. But his toughest fight is yet to come. On Britain’s general election trail, our correspondent found voters less keen on the prospect of a Labour victory than on punishing the Conservative party at the polls (10:00). And remembering Birubala Rabha, who campaigned against witch-hunting in India (18.35).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
No energy source has ever increased as fast as solar photovoltaics. The technology will transform humanity’s energy consumption–even when the sun doesn’t shine. Many people associate champagne with success but wine collectors often shun it. Now global sales are fizzing (10:51). And many chief executives are early birds, not night owls. Does it really pay to be up with the larks (18:32)?Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Both the left and right are likely to do well in France’s upcoming parliamentary poll, with President Emmanuel Macron’s party squeezed in the middle. The snap election could leave the country in chaos. In America, recreational use of weed is now commonplace, but what impact does it have on users’ wellbeing (10:06)? And the joy of short books: the intense pleasure of a quickie (17:40).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The post-war generation reaped the benefits of peace and prosperity. Yet rather than spend that bounty, retired boomers are hoarding their riches–and upending economists’ expectations. The science of menstruation is baffling, partly because most animals don’t do it. Now clever innovations may help improve women’s health (9:13). And how old-fashioned wind-power is blowing new life into the shipping industry–and cutting its emissions (16:13).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Much of Sudan has already collapsed into chaos. Now a crucial city may fall, the United Nations is belatedly scrambling to avert a bloodbath. Gary Lineker is a former footballer, broadcaster and podcast mogul. He also embodies Britain’s social aspirations (10:52). And the women in Japan who pay men to praise them (18:49). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Britain’s pint-sipping rabble-rouser of the right has joined the campaigning ahead of a general election. Win or lose, he will make an impact. America’s stadiums and arenas are often built using taxpayer dollars; they are also often terrible value for money (10:08). And a tribute to William Anders, an astronaut who snapped one of history’s most famed photographs (17:15).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
America’s upbeat assessment of a ceasefire deal masks deep divides that may not, in fact, be bridgeable. There are nevertheless reasons for optimism. Our data team digs into the accusation that the New York Times’s bestseller list is biased against conservatives (10:58). And why a quirk of British regulation is holding back its non-alcoholic-drinks industry (19:08). Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We have dusted off and tuned up our forecast model for America’s presidential race. So far it gives Donald Trump a marginally higher chance of a second term. There is at last progress on not one but two vaccines to beat malaria (9:02). And a look at the “tradwives” of TikTok: passionate homemakers who prefer the gender roles of the past (15:10).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Across the rich world millions spend more than a third of their disposable income on rent. We ask why policymakers have such terrible ideas on easing the pressure. America’s bid to crimp TikTok has raised a flurry of issues far graver than social-media scrolling (9:53). And why pop stars are (again) embracing the album over the single (15:46).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Hard-right parties did well in Europe's parliamentary elections—so well in France that President Emmanuel Macron called a risky snap election. Elsewhere, though, the political centre held. We examine the policies that are getting America’s many chronically truant students back in school (9:13). And the delicate business of naming a new car (16:42).Get a world of insights by subscribing to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Narendra Modi has been chosen to lead India for the third time in a row. But after 10 years in power, he was humbled at the national election. What kind of leader will he be? Stories from his youth in the Hindu nationalist movement offer clues.This episode draws on audio from the following publishers: Narendra Modi YouTube, ANI, Legend Global Studios, Lalit Vachani, Prasar Bharti Archives, Desh Gujarat, The New York Times, NDTV, Doordarshan and BBC.To listen to the full series, search "The Modi Raj" and subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
When Russia attacked the Kakhovka dam in Ukraine a year ago, lives were lost, families stranded and towns submerged. But from that devastation emerged discussion on post-war reconstruction. Our correspondent spent months investigating Narendra Modi, the strongman who was humbled at this week’s Indian election (10:02). And remembering Barry Kemp, the Egyptologist who dug up Akhenaten’s abandoned city (17:18).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
As Britain’s general-election campaign heats up, party leaders are vague on their economic plans. With growth so slow, how could the victor energise the economy? We visit the D-day beaches 80 years on, as war rages in Europe once again (10:19). And Venice’s new daytripper fee is designed to curb crowds. But putting a price on protecting beauty is proving controversial (17:42).  Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Narendra Modi, the strongman of India, will have to compromise now his party has lost its majority. What does the surprise result mean for the country? As some foreign investors shy away from Africa, the continent’s private sector is serving domestic customers to fill that hole (10:02). And how mastering circus stunts could help future moon-dwellers exercise (16:42).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trailer: The Modi Raj

Trailer: The Modi Raj

2024-06-0504:58

Narendra Modi is one of the most popular politicians on the planet. India’s prime minister is eyeing a third term atop the world’s biggest democracy. A tea-seller’s son, Mr Modi began life an outsider. The man behind the political phenomenon remains hard to fathom. India has become an economic powerhouse during his ten years in charge. But he’s also the frontman for a chauvinistic Hindu nationalist dogma. Can Mr Modi continue to balance both parts of his agenda and finish the job of turning India into a superpower? The Economist’s Avantika Chilkoti finds out what makes him tick. Launching June 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
There has been a slow strangling of freedom in the territory where pro-democracy activists have been convicted; an annual vigil for the victims of the Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing in 1989 has been replaced by a food fair. A boom in startups suggests America is recovering its pioneering spirit (8:06). And remembering June Mendoza, portrait painter to the royals, and the less well-known (16:28).Until June 5th, get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Claudia Sheinbaum has been elected Mexico’s first female president. Now the real fight begins: crime is rocketing, corruption is rampant and the country is divided. Hurricane season has arrived in the Atlantic, and America’s coastal states are braced for a stormy one—thanks to forces both natural and man-linked (11:02). And introducing the new co-host of “The Intelligence” (20:11).Until June 5th get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Trailer: The Modi Raj

Trailer: The Modi Raj

2024-06-0104:58

Narendra Modi is one of the most popular politicians on the planet. India’s prime minister is eyeing a third term atop the world’s biggest democracy. A tea-seller’s son, Mr Modi began life an outsider and the man behind the political phenomenon remains hard to fathom. India has become an economic powerhouse during his ten years in charge. But he’s also the frontman for a chauvinistic Hindu nationalist dogma. Can Mr Modi continue to balance both parts of his agenda and finish the job of turning India into a superpower? The Economist’s Avantika Chilkoti finds out what makes him tick. Launching June 2024.To listen to the full series, subscribe to Economist Podcasts+.If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
In 2022 the Supreme Court gave control of abortion back to “the people and their elected representatives.” This November will be the greatest test yet of what that means. Democrats are running hard on the issue and as many as 16 states will vote directly on abortion. A grassroots movement has sprung up to defend reproductive rights. Will this fight decide the election? And what will the results mean for women’s ability to have an abortion? Charlotte Howard hosts with Sacha Nauta and Idrees Kahloon. Mary Ziegler of the University of California, Davis, and The Economist’s Stevie Hertz and Daniella Raz also contribute. Transcripts of our podcasts are available via economist.com/podcastsGet a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+ For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Comments (262)

Rachel Warrington

Boomers are tight because, we've had years added to our pension dates, we've been through many changes to the pension systems, we've seen our money crash too many times and we don't trust the politicians not to screw us over with taxes, or even to move the pension goalposts further and further away. Add to that we expect to live longer and need more care, so what we do have needs to stretch till we're 90

Jun 21st
Reply

Rob

Or a real peace of work?

Jun 13th
Reply

Tim

this is true, that's why I don't have any Chinese app on this phone

Apr 2nd
Reply

Rachel Warrington

All we seem to hear about on the climate crisis is about switching from oil to other sources of energy. Why is there no conversation about what we need to do to stop using plastics and other oil derivated materials?

Apr 1st
Reply

Tim

I'm not spending one dollar on temu, because I'm from that country and know what a shithole it is and what a rogue company pdd is.

Mar 21st
Reply

Donald Hawk

Great story. Wish we could get our politicians to experience this story instead of photo ops

Mar 10th
Reply

David Henderson

Your coverage of events in Gaza are dripping with bias. Imagine for just one moment how you would report on this matter if the Palestinians were white and western, and then try to muster the journalistic courage to report like that

Mar 5th
Reply

Aryo1

rest in peace 🕊️ alexei ❤️for alexei navalny and who fight dictatorship around the world

Feb 17th
Reply

Mehdibadri

🌹🌹🌹

Dec 19th
Reply

Julio Santiago Guerrero Kesselman

A very biased point of view against Milei, the podcast makes him seem as a madman. Why not talk about his lengthy tenure in Academia, or the fact that he is the only candidate that has clear ideas and how to implement them?

Nov 21st
Reply (1)

Aakash Amanat

I thoroughly enjoy the Economist Podcasts and believe they offer a remarkable resource for those interested in economics and global affairs. The Economist's reputation for insightful and well-researched analysis is well-reflected in their podcast content. The diverse range of topics covered, from macroeconomic trends to specific policy issues, ensures there is something for everyone. https://www.bunity.com/kraft-paper-printer The in-depth interviews with prominent experts and world leaders provide valuable insights, and the ability to delve into complex subjects in an accessible manner is a testament to the podcast's quality. Furthermore, the global perspective offered by The Economist is invaluable in today's interconnected world, helping listeners understand the complex web of economic, political, and social forces that shape our lives. https://www.whodoyou.com/biz/2235358/kraft-paper-printer-england-gb

Nov 2nd
Reply

Ben Snow

similarly, the UK shuttered its asylums but is now building new ones

Oct 21st
Reply

Aryo1

why not fuking News agancy not sey they was satelers? and beloved tourist are in satelers city?

Oct 12th
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Hafiz Tajuddin

I only started listening to Drum Tower very recently. I appreciate the slightly less than formal "business casual" syle of presentation. I especially love the insights into life in China by David and Alice. Keep up the good work.

Oct 12th
Reply

salmon

Economist hasn't tired from lying about Palestine? Money of Jews can change your opinion but can't change the Truth and reality

Oct 11th
Reply

tomas ryan

absolute crap

Oct 5th
Reply

Antoni Markovich

If you book an airport transfer, you can include this and more in the car: https://atobtransfer.com/

Sep 29th
Reply

Must Listener

Thank you, creators of new medicine. Please be humans, please give people live and open new sources to get money - like UN (where other countries contribute too), enhance cooperation with other countries and develop charity, because it is important to deliver treatment to all who need it, not only the richest. Thank you! 😍

Sep 22nd
Reply

Hamid Reza Yazdani

this episode and the previous one can not be downloaded, I wonder why? do others have the same problem?

Sep 4th
Reply (1)

Michael Meenan

A claim of corruption is vacuous without providing details that explain the methodology, the process, how it works & how it can be interdicted and reversed. The drone attacks in several Russian locations indicate a better level of coordination than the Podcast suggests. These two respective points leave me a little under informed and a tad skeptical. However, Russia's military industrial production capacity juxtaposed to Ukraine's variable supply chain is a serious point well-taken - one for Ukraine and the West to address presently as autumn & winter approach. Currently, Russia has no game other than aerial bombardment.

Aug 30th
Reply