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Footnoting History

Footnoting History

Author: Footnoting History

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Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
305 Episodes
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(Host: Kristin) Historians rely a lot on primary source evidence to interpret the past. But what do you do when multiple sources tell a different story of what happened? Learn about the many accounts of the execution of Anne Boleyn and consider what they tell us about a major moment in English history with Kristin in this week’s episode of Footnoting History! 
(Host: Josh)  Alfred, or sometimes Alferd Packer, is one of the most infamous villains in Colorado history. As the story goes, Packer, a trail guide, led his party into disaster and then killed them one by one before consuming their bodies in order to survive. He was arrested, tried, convicted, and then escaped. Once reprehended Packer changed his story once again. And now more recent evidence has emerged that seems to have exonerated him. We’ll try to sort of this out on this week’s episode of Footnoting History.
(Host: Christine) In the late 1800s, a dog called Owney became a star as he won over the hearts of postal workers across the United States and sometimes, even, beyond. This episode is all about Owney, his adventures, the souvenirs he collected, and his revered place in postal history.
Medieval Coroners

Medieval Coroners

2024-04-0611:38

(Host: Samantha) If you've watched any significant number of crime dramas you've almost certainly come across a coroner who was probably presented as an experienced medical examiner who, if the hero is lucky, has unearthed a key piece of evidence to solve the case. But did you know that coroners have been investigating death since the end of the twelfth century? Learn more right now on Footnoting History.
(Host: Kristin)  Clothes and hair are among the most famous things about Marie Antoinette. But who were the designers behind the drama and what happened to them after the Revolution? And how did anyone actually wear – or afford – their creations? Find out this week on Footnoting History!  
(Host: Lucy) How much is it impossible to know about an icon? This episode investigates Tadeusz Kościuszko’s place in historical memory. From the early 19th century onwards, myths coalesced around him and his role in the Polish struggle for independence. Paradoxically, his contemporary fame can make it harder for historians to find facts. As a disabled war veteran who fought for racial and religious equality, moreover, Kościuszko is a figure more complex than the heroic narratives that have often formed around him.
(Host: Lucy) Tadeusz Kościuszko was a leader in the Age of Revolutions, lending strategic expertise to the Continental Army during the American Revolution, and trying on no fewer than three occasions to secure lasting independence for his native Poland. He also managed to personally offend Napoleon. This podcast gets into lost love, international politics, peasants with pitchforks, the anti-slavery movement, and why Kościuszko crossed the Atlantic so many times.
Harry Washington

Harry Washington

2024-02-1022:55

(Host: Josh) When someone says "Washington" and "revolution" in the same sentence, George immediately comes to mind. But there's another Washington that we should know, one that George Washington enslaved. Harry Washington escaped from his enslavement, fought for the British in during the American Revolution, and eventually fought in his own revolution in Sierra Leone. Let's take another look at the American Revolution in this episode of Footnoting History.
(Host: Christine)  In 1884, a yacht called Mignonette left England for Australia but never reached its destination. After it was lost, those aboard were adrift at sea for weeks, resorting to desperate measures for survival. Here, Christine covers the ill-fated voyage, the murder trial it sparked, and how the story lives on in pop culture. 
(Hosts: Christine, Kristin, Josh) A tradition continues! Celebrate with us through this episode about the history surrounding a selection of end-of-the-year holidays.
(Christine and Josh) One of the most powerful popes of the Middle Ages, Innocent III made sure to have his hand in everything from religious wars like the Crusades to political squabbles with kings. Here, Josh and Christine take a look at some of the most interesting points in the life of the controversial pontiff. 
Kościuszko Squadron

Kościuszko Squadron

2023-11-1117:19

(Host: Lucy)  What ties together a Revolutionary War hero, a Hollywood film director, and twentieth-century Poland’s quest for political independence? The Kościuszko Squadron was an international flying squad, whose airmen included former prisoners of war, idealistic Americans, and international adventurers. The Polish-Soviet War is a conflict that, having taken place in the shadow of the First World War, is largely overlooked in the US today. But at the time, the conflict and the Kościuszko Squadron, named after Tadeusz Kościuszko, generated international enthusiasm and publications from Polish-American presses. This podcast explores this flamboyant, neglected history.
(Hosts: Christine, Kristin, Lucy) It's hard to believe but here we are celebrating a decade of creepy stories from history for our favorite scary holiday!
(Kristin)  In 1324, a woman named Alice Kyteler was accused of witchcraft in Kilkenny, Ireland. Her story is mysterious and fascinating and considered a landmark case in the history of European witch trials. Find out what happened – or didn’t – this week on Footnoting History!
(Christine) In 1913, Leo Frank was arrested for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan in Atlanta, Georgia. Two years later, he, too, was dead. In this episode, Christine explores the complicated case and its perhaps unexpected musical theatre legacy.
(Kristin) Ever stopped to think about how amazing it is that you have this box, in your home, that keeps food cold? Reliable, at-home refrigeration is pretty new to history – and utterly transformative of how we live. Learn about how this technology came to be so commonplace – and how it changed the world, this week on Footnoting History! 
(Samantha) In the summer of 1678 a defrocked preacher named Titus Oates claimed to have knowledge of a Catholic plot to kill King Charles II and to replace him with his crypto-Catholic brother. At first the story gained no traction, reported as it was by a man of dubious reputation, but when Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey (the man who had first investigated Oates’ story) was found dead people started listening. This week we’ll lay it all out for you: who was Titus Oats? What’s the deal with Godfrey’s death? And what happened when people came to believe that there was a plot against Charles? 
(Christine) Of the four sons of King Henry II of England and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine who lived to adulthood, only one was never called king. In this episode we look at the life of Geoffrey, duke of Brittany, including why he has a reputation for being conniving and the fates of the children he left behind. 
(Lucy and Rachel) In the often-chaotic society of sixteenth-century England, many people enthusiastically consumed true crime narratives in songs, news, and theater plays. Then as now, true crime narratives often centered on community crime-solving as a way of dealing with sensational and upsetting violence. Whether in the form of domestic tragedies or elaborate revenge dramas, true crime played to packed houses in the theaters of Elizabethan London. Amid religious and political upheaval, the popularity of true crime attested not just to evolving habits of media consumption, but also to powerful desires for communal order and mutual responsibility. In this episode, Lucy and guest host Dr. Rachel Clark examine true love, strong hate, and swift revenge – and why audiences tend to love a good murder.
(Josh) In 1896, retired from his life in the so-called "Wild West," Wyatt Earp was asked to referee a boxing match. But not just any boxing match - a bout that would determine the new heavyweight champion. Two legendary boxers, Bob Fitzsimmons and Tom Sharkey, duked it out in San Francisco. The legendary lawman Earp allegedly fixed the fight. On this episode of Footnoting History, come along from a walk through the seedy underbelly of illegal prizefighting and learn how Earp found himself at the center of tremendous controversy.
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Comments (22)

Nina Brown

💚CLICK HERE Full HD>720p>1080p>4K💚WATCH>ᗪOᗯᑎᒪOᗩᗪ>LINK> 👉https://co.fastmovies.org

Feb 4th
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Yasmine C

She played both sides!

Feb 23rd
Reply

Br0wnie

What a fascinating woman! I had never heard of Irene of Byzantine. What a fantastic life she lived, and proof that even the humblest of beginnings does not limit ones abilities or potential.

Jun 2nd
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Br0wnie

Great historic info that is rarely discussed in general history and world history books.

Apr 25th
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Br0wnie

Personal & Professional life of #MilicentPatrick is fascinating. The way she was black balled by #OldHollywood & #Disney because of a man's inferiority complex is just foul! Shame on all who participated or profited from her maltreatment or that of others.

Apr 19th
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Br0wnie

Love the #History of #France #NapoleonEmpress

Apr 7th
Reply

Br0wnie

Oh wow! So impressed with all the knowledge I gained about #divorce, divorce #history, and purpose in #Revolutionary #France. Fantastic job!

Apr 7th
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Rick Costello

it seems very convenient that you forgot that Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood in your criticism of the progressive organizations that favored eugenics.

Jan 26th
Reply

Yasmine C

spooky tales

Oct 31st
Reply

Top Clean

Yes a great Episode. And Thanks for the Further Reading list too. (^^,) Manuel Aguilar-Moreno, Handbook to Life in the Aztec World, Oxford University Press, (2007). David Carrasco, The Aztecs: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, (2012). Foundation for the Advancement of Mesoamerican Studies, Inc. Millie Gimmel, “Reading Medicine in the Codex de la Cruz Badiano”, Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (2008): 169-92. Patrizia Granziera, “Gardens and public parks in Cuernavaca: transformations of a cultural landscape.” Landscape History 38:2 (2017): 97-108. Francisco Guerra, “Aztec Medicine,” Medical History 10 (1966): 315-338. James Maffie, “Teotl as Olin,” in: Aztec Philosophy: Understanding a World in Motion, University Press of Colorado, (2014): 185-260. NAHUATLAHTOLLI [language course]. Sylvie Peperstraete, “Representing the Human Body in Postclassic Central Mexico: A Study of Proportions and Their Evolution in the Aztec Pictorial Tradition,” in: Anthropomorphic Imagery

Sep 19th
Reply (1)

Br0wnie

Great summary of the Aztec culture, history, social, and religious practices. I wish the titles of books and/or articles were included in show summary to make further research easier.

Sep 19th
Reply (1)

Yasmine C

I thought they were called warlocks...my bad.

Aug 22nd
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Yasmine C

The Chinese were the first people to not be allowed to immigrate simply because of their race. The Immigration Bureau, the great grandaddy of ICE, was created just to keep Chinese out. Modern immigration policy like family separation came from exclusion.

Aug 9th
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Chris Barnhill

p

Apr 17th
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Top Clean

Thanks for a good episode on this lady.

Dec 12th
Reply (1)

Top Clean

What a great collection and diversity of Podcasts here. 👍 Highly Recommended. It got all things between heaven and your ears. (^^,) History + Sherlock Holmes + Dogs + Diet + Bible + Crime + etc. + many more...

Dec 7th
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Amy White

uses of voice as if reading a bedtime story to a child

Jun 3rd
Reply (2)