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After last week’s Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, we’re tracking the fallout from the business perspective. From CVS to Meta, companies are making changes that may impact reproductive health care. Plus, listen up, space geeks! We’ve got news about NASA’s return to the moon. And, what do Mason jars have to do with space exploration? We’ll make you smart. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Jan. 6 Panel Abruptly Sets Tuesday Hearing on ‘Recently Obtained Evidence’” from The New York Times The cover of the July 4 issue of The New Yorker “CVS capping purchases of Plan B pills to ensure consistent supply” from CNBC “Facebook Is Banning People Who Say They Will Mail Abortion Pills” from Vice “NASA Completes Artemis I Moon Rocket Test, Moves Forward Toward Launch” from SciTech Daily “How a teen lifeguard took on the gender pay gap — and what she gained” from The Washington Post Ball Aerospace: A company known for Mason jars helped with NASA’s Orion capsule from Slate We want to hear from you. Leave us a question or comment at makemesmart@marketplace.org or at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
Between today’s Supreme Court ruling on abortion, its recent decision on guns and the Jan. 6 hearings, our democratic system is in a bit of shock. And it might not end anytime soon. On the show today, we’re talking about the Supreme Court’s abortion decision and what it could mean for rights we thought were protected, from contraception to same-sex marriage. Plus, we wrap the week with a round of Half Full/Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization “The companies that will cover travel expenses for employee abortions.” from The New York Times “House sends bipartisan gun safety bill to Biden” from Politico “States Rush to Revamp Laws After Supreme Court’s Gun Ruling” from The New York Times We want to hear from you. How are you coping with the deluge of news? Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
It’s not just you. Housing affordability is getting worse. Marketplace’s Amy Scott, who covers housing, is here for a news fix on the state of the market. Plus, the economy is giving us bad vibes, and so is the Supreme Court. Then, would you like to sleep in a giant windowless (fake) potato, or what about a submarine? Finally, why Airbnb listings are about to get wild. Here’s everything we talked about today: Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol from the House of Representatives “Confidence in U.S. Supreme Court Sinks to Historic Low” from Gallup “Homebuyer affordability worsens in May amid inflation, higher mortgage rates” from HousingWire “Keyword Searches Around ‘Recession’ and ‘Bear Market’ on the Rise” from Similarweb Blog “Airbnb Is Giving Away $10 Million to Build the ‘Craziest Places on Earth’” from Bloomberg “When a U.S. swimmer sank to the bottom of the pool, her coach jumped in to save her” from NPR Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap. We’ll be on the YouTube livestream starting at 6:30 ET/3:30 PT. We’ll have more news, drinks and a game!
Are recessions normal?

Are recessions normal?

2022-06-2321:571

Recessions are on lots of people’s minds these days, including Jerome Powell’s. The Federal Reserve chief told Congress on Wednesday that a recession is a “possibility” as the Fed tries to tame inflation. So today, a listener wonders whether recessions are inevitable in our modern economy. We’ll break it down. Plus, we take more of your questions about the effectiveness of gas boycotts, why the Sunshine State — Florida — isn’t leading on solar energy and Kimberly’s favorite cocktail ingredient, bitters! Here’s everything we talked about today: FAQs on recessions from the National Bureau of Economic Research “Odds of a recession rising but vary widely” from Marketplace “Why isn’t the Sunshine State the leader in using solar power?” from The Sun-Sentinel “Would a Gas Boycott Actually Lower Prices at the Pump?” from Money magazine “< Oil: Less Than Zero” from Marketplace alum Stacey Vanek Smith at NPR “How new job-search technologies are affecting the U.S. labor market” from the Washington Center for Equitable Growth Keep sending us your questions. Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
Inflation is the economic story of the day. And, even though it’s been percolating for over a year, last week the inflation story kicked into high gear with the Federal Reserve making big moves to get rising prices under control. So what changed, exactly? For starters, a combination of reports showing the worse of inflation isn’t over and that consumers expect inflation to keep rising. “And so, that was one of the reasons why we saw the Fed do, a bigger rate hike than they were originally expecting, said Victoria Guida, who covers the Federal Reserve for Politico. “It wasn’t just because they wanted to get interest rates up faster, it was also sort of a message to the American public: ‘Hey, we’re really serious about getting inflation back down. So, you know, don’t get it into your heads that inflation is going to stay this high forever.'” On the show today: How the Fed miscalculated inflation, and why we may not know how well the Fed navigated this moment until years down the road. Plus, we’ll answer a couple of your inflation questions. Later, we’ll discuss how companies are responding to inflation and the scale of China’s surveillance state. Then, if you have a hard time remembering the weather in Celsius, a listener shares a hack that’ll make you sound smart in front of your friends. And an answer to the Make Me Smart question that has many of us nodding along. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Failure ‘not an option’: Fed vows all-out fight on inflation” from Politico “On Inflation, Economics Has Some Explaining to Do” from The Wall Street Journal “Recession-Fearing Bosses Quietly Abandon Open Jobs” from Bloomberg “China’s Surveillance State Is Growing. These Documents Reveal How.” from The New York Times “Greitens ‘RINO hunting’ ad gets attention and condemnation” from St. Louis Public Radio Join us tomorrow for Whaddya Wanna Know Wednesday. And if you’ve got a question you’d like us to answer in a future show, email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
Today we’re looking ahead to next week, when kids 6 months to 5 years old should finally get access to a COVID vaccine. It’s giving us spring 2021 flashbacks. Then we’ll touch on the latest in rising infla — HEY, PAY ATTENTION, THIS IS IMPORTANT! Plus, climate change and the significance of corporate America speaking out about the threats to our democracy. We’ll wrap up the week with a round of our favorite game, Half Full / Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Why some parents are skeptical about covid vaccines for young children” from The Washington Post WMO Weather Reports 2050 – France “Fed Raises Interest Rates In Effort To — Hey, Pay Attention, This Is Important!” from The Onion “Bill Gates says crypto and NFTs are a sham” from CNN “Squid Game” Reality TV Show Coming to Netflix from The Hollywood Reporter “Pardon Me, Do You Have Any Grey Poupon Ice Cream? The Dijon Mustard-Flavored Treat Is Now Available Nationwide” from Food & Wine magazine “U.K. weighs whether to restore its old system of imperial measurements” from Marketplace “Does this AI know it’s alive?” from Vox We’ll be off Monday to observe Juneteenth. Join us Tuesday for a deep dive about inflation. In the meantime, keep sending your inflation- and non-inflation- related questions to makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
During today’s Jan. 6 committee hearing, we learned about the role former Vice President Mike Pence played in responding to the insurrection at the Capitol. On the show, the hosts breakdown some of the key testimony and look to history as a guide for what they hope might come next in the hearings. Plus, we’ll introduce you another TikTokker with ridiculous geolocating skills. And good news for the ship that inspired the film “The Goonies”! Here’s everything we talked about today: “The 16 most compelling lines from today’s January 6 committee hearing “ from CNN “Trump’s Campaign to Influence Vice President Pence” from C-SPAN Meet this Google Maps player “Legendary Spanish galleon shipwreck discovered on Oregon coast” from National Geographic “17th-Century Spanish Shipwreck Found Off Oregon Coast” from The Daily Beast If you’re watching the Jan. 6 hearings, tell us what your biggest takeaways have been so far. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
The Federal Reserve raised interest rates today by the largest amount since 1994 to try to get inflation under control. One of our listeners is wondering what the average consumer can do to keep inflation at bay. We’ll offer a potential solution. Plus, we tackle your questions about rent control, private equity and the costs of all those canceled flights. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Federal Reserve attacks inflation with its largest rate hike since 1994” from Marketplace “Private equity will buy up companies to the tune of $1 trillion this year” from Marketplace Private equity explained “How Private Equity Looted America” from Mother Jones “It’s a pain to fly these days. The FAA and airlines are trying to fix that” from CNBC If you’ve got a question for us, send it to makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
For days now, we’ve been talking about something that happened 17 months ago, the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Congressional hearings into the events of that day started last week. The details can feel removed from the day-to-day economic struggles of the average American, but they are crucial. The Jan. 6 committee wants Americans to “understand that not only what happened was bad, it’s ongoing. This is still a threat to the country, is still a threat to democracy. And that if you do care about the economy, you need to make sure that we have a functioning government to confront those problems in the future too,” said Kyle Cheney, senior legal affairs reporter at Politico. On the show today, we’re talking about the aftermath of Jan. 6, what may come after the hearings and why this is important for the stability of our democracy and our economy. Later, we’ll discuss the rising tide of white nationalism and extremism after the arrests of dozens of people who police say were plotting to attack an LGBTQ pride event in Idaho. Also, crypto winter is here! Are the layoffs at Coinbase the first of many? Plus, listeners weigh in on the housing market and Taco Bell ditching dine-in service. Then, we end the show with a fatherly answer to the “Make Me Smart” question. Here’s everything we talked about today: Kyle Cheney’s Twitter feed “Jan. 6 panel makes case election fraud claims were Trump vs. ‘Team Normal’” from Politico FBI assisting investigation of Patriot Front, an alleged white nationalist group accused of planning riot at Idaho Pride event from CBS News “CDC Rescinds Order Requiring Negative Pre-Departure COVID-19 Test Prior to Flight to the US“ “Title 42 and its Impact on Migrant Families” from Kaiser Family Foundation “Coinbase says it will cut 18 percent of its work force.” from The New York Times Join us tomorrow for Whaddya Wanna Know Wednesday. If you’ve got a question you’d like our hosts to answer, send it our way. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
It’s Day 2 of the Jan. 6 hearings, and we’re learning more about the money involved in perpetuating false election claims. On Monday, the panel said the Trump campaign raised $250 million from donors who believed their money was going to investigate potential voter fraud. “The big lie was also a big rip-off,” Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California said. We’ll explain where the money really went. Plus, the markets are getting clobbered. How should the Federal Reserve react? And a fun fact we learned that’ll impress your friends the next time you pop champagne. Cheers! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Jan. 6 panel makes case election fraud claims were Trump vs. ‘Team Normal’” from Politico “The Fed May Discuss Biggest Interest Rate Increase Since 1994″ from The New York Times “Opinion: The Federal Reserve should go big now to fight inflation” from The Washington Post Video: Watch a guy on TikTok geolocate images “Popping a champagne cork creates supersonic shockwaves” from Popular Science Got a question or comment for us? Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
Last night we tuned in to the prime-time airing of the Jan. 6 committee hearing (we’d love to hear your thoughts if you were too). And today we’re going to talk about it. We’ve also got updates on COVID testing for international flyers to the U.S. and a possible falling out between Meta and its chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg. Then during Half Full/Half Empty, Kai and Kimberly weigh in on financial literacy classes, the Novavax COVID vaccine, converting classic cars into electric vehicles, a new European Union tech rule and Taco Bell’s new drive-thru architecture. Here’s everything we talked about on the show today: “Ginni Thomas pressed 29 Ariz. lawmakers to help overturn Trump’s defeat, emails show” from The Washington Post The official statement from Washington Commanders head coach Ron Rivera regarding defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio’s comments “U.S. to lift covid testing requirement for fliers entering the country” from The Washington Post “Meta Scrutinizing Sheryl Sandberg’s Use of Facebook Resources Over Several Years” from The Wall Street Journal “States are adding a new requirement for high school graduation: financial literacy” from Marketplace “At this point in the pandemic, will there be a market for the Novavax vaccine?” from Marketplace “Car buffs want to turn classic rides into EVs. These Southern California businesses are making it happen.” from Marketplace “New EU rule will require all phones and electronics to use a standard charger” from CNN “See Taco Bell’s new floating restaurant that delivers tacos from the sky” from CNN Are you keeping an eye on the Jan. 6 hearings? Send us an email with your thoughts or questions at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
This week, U.S. Sens. Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York introduced a bill to regulate cryptocurrencies. Then, they went on TV pumping up bitcoin. We’ll explain why that’s not cool, starting with the fact that, according to her financial disclosures, Lummis is a big-time crypto investor. Consult your own financial advisers, and think twice before investing in crypto via your retirement account. Plus, tonight’s Jan. 6 committee hearings are this generation’s Watergate moment. Will you be watching? And, are UFOs real? NASA wants to find out. Here’s everything we talked about today: Sens. Lummis and Gillibrand pumping up bitcoin on Twitter “First Open Testimony Before January 6 Committee” from C-SPAN Fourth Amendment | Resources | Constitution Annotated | Congress.gov | Library of Congress “Supreme Court Makes Federal Officials ‘Absolutely Immunized’ From Personal Lawsuits” from Government Executive “The Supreme Court gives lawsuit immunity to Border Patrol agents who violate the Constitution” from Vox “NASA Starts a Scientific Study to Find Out if UFOs Exist” from Bloomberg Fact Sheet: Biden Administration Announces Operational Plan for COVID-19 Vaccinations for Children Under 5 | The White House We’d love to hear from you. Let us know what you think about today’s show or anything else that’s on your mind. You can reach us at makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
A major stock index entered “bear” market territory recently. One of our listeners is wondering why we call it a “bear” or “bull” market and where those terms come from. We have some answers. Plus, more of your questions about gun manufacturing, the Federal Reserve and why the heck Mariah Carey is getting sued over her holiday hit “All I Want For Christmas Is You” almost 30 years after it was released? Here’s everything we talked about today: “Why we use animals to describe what’s going on with the stock market or economy” from Marketplace The Gun Industry in America from The Center for American Progress “President Biden calls for assault weapons ban and other measures to curb gun violence” from NPR “Colt Says Its Decision to Stop Making AR-15 Rifles for Civilians Is Driven by Customers. Experts Aren’t So Sure” from TIME Magazine “How Mariah Carey’s Christmas Hit Can Still Face a Copyright Lawsuit 30 Years Later” from Billboard If you have a question you’d like us to find the answer to, send it our way. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
This country had a problem with housing before the pandemic. But it got real bananapants in the midst of it. A large part of why we’re in this mess comes down to supply and demand. There’s just not enough homes to go around, which is driving up prices. Housing prices are up 20% from last year, and experts say we need up to 6.8 million units to meet demand. So if it’s a supply problem, why can’t we just build more homes? “Builders like to talk about the three L’s that go into housing: land, labor and lumber. And all of those things are harder to get. And more expensive,” said Amy Scott, a senior correspondent at Marketplace who covers housing. On today’s show: Amy explains how we got here and why solving the housing shortage is a lot more complicated than it sounds. In the News Fix, as the Jan. 6 committee prepares for public hearings this week, authorities continue to make arrests in connection with the attack on the Capitol. Plus, we’re talking stagflation. Then, we’ll hear from an educator who is rethinking the teaching profession. And, who knew so many of you loved popcorn?! Here’s everything we talked about today: “In addressing the housing shortage, we might need to rethink the way housing policy works” from Marketplace “There’s never been such a severe shortage of homes in the U.S. Here’s why” from NPR “The U.S. Housing Market Has Peaked” from The Atlantic “Explainer: Hundreds charged with crimes in Capitol attack” from the Associated Press Uvalde teacher speaks out from ABC News “World Bank Warns of Stagflation Risk, Cuts Global Growth Forecast to 2.9%” from The Wall Street Journal When you’re done listening, send us your answer to the “Make Me Smart” question. We’re at makemesmart@marketplace.org and (508) 827- 6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
The cost of our comfort

The cost of our comfort

2022-06-0716:491

There’s a lot competing for our attention these days, from the Jan. 6 committee hearings that get underway this week to the aftermath of the massacre in Uvalde, Texas. On the show today, we discuss whether our ability to turn away from seeing horrific images and witnessing history has a price. Plus, the Elon Musk-Twitter saga continues. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Trump on Trial: A Guide to the January 6 Hearings and the Question of Criminality” from the Brookings Institution Opinion | “It’s Been 50 Years. I Am Not ‘Napalm Girl’ Anymore.” from The New York Times Opinion | Nick Ut: I took the photo of Kim Phuc that helped end the Vietnam War. Photojournalism still matters today. from The Washington Post “Publishing Photos of Dead Children Could Backfire” from The Atlantic “Elon Musk Threatens to End Twitter Deal Over Lack of Information on Spam Accounts” from The Wall Street Journal Is the Swedengate hospitality controversy real? Long ago, maybe. from The Washington Post “Autonomous Mayflower Messes up Trip That Humans Successfully Completed Hundreds of Years Ago” from Jalopnik Let us know what you think about today’s show. Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or call us at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B- SMART.
Move over, NRA. There’s a new gun rights group that’s spending more money on lobbying Congress. On the show today, we’re talking about the National Shooting Sports Foundation and its surprising connection to Kimberly’s neighborhood bar. Plus, more crypto scams, and a Texas teen wins the national spelling bee. C-o-n-g-r-a-t-u-l-a-t-i-o-n-s-! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Gun industry group in Connecticut outpaces NRA in lobbying, hopes to protect access to semi-automatic weapons” from WBUR “New Analysis Finds Consumers Reported Losing More than $1 Billion in Cryptocurrency to Scams since 2021” from the Federal Trade Commission “Fetterman says he ‘almost died’ after ignoring heart condition” from The Washington Post Former Trump Adviser Charged With Contempt for Defying Jan. 6 Subpoena from The New York Times “Texas teenager is the new champion of the Scripps National Spelling Bee” from NPR When you’re done listening to the show, tell us what’s on your mind. Send us an email at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
Enter, Judge TikTok

Enter, Judge TikTok

2022-06-0319:39

We’re not huge celebrity news watchers, but we just couldn’t avoid the coverage of the Johnny Depp-Amber Heard defamation trial. This week, a jury sided with Depp and awarded him $15 million in damages. Today, we’ll unpack how the case played out on social media platforms and what it could mean for the future of the #MeToo movement. Plus, the baby formula shortage is still really bad. And Ukraine might be headed to the World Cup. Gooooal! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Amber Heard-Johnny Depp Trial: Survivors ‘Sickened’ by Verdict” from Rolling Stone “Depp-Heard verdict will hold back #MeToo movement, advocates fear” from The Washington Post “Monica Lewinsky’s Verdict on the Johnny Depp–Amber Heard Trial: We Are All Guilty” from Vanity Fair “Why the Depp-Heard trial is so much worse than you realize” from Vox “Baby Formula Shortage Worsens to 74% Out of Stock in US” from Bloomberg “US Will Airlift Baby Formula From Abroad as Shortages Grow Worse” from The New York Times “For Ukraine the World Cup looked unthinkable. Now they’re 1 game away after spirited win over Scotland” from ESPN “Do Swedish People Feed Their Guests?” from The New York Times What cultural norms have you become smart about? Email us makemesmart@marketplace.org or call us at 508-827-6278 or 508-U-B-SMART.
Regular listeners of this podcast might recall an episode we did a few years back on Modern Monetary Theory. MMT is the economic theory that basically says a country that controls its own currency can’t go broke because it can always print more money. But with inflation at 8.3%, one listener is wondering whether rising prices disproves MMT. We call the expert on MMT to find out. Plus, we take your questions about how canceling student loan debt might affect the wealth gap, using a single world currency and the economic consequences if part of Oregon really secede to Idaho. Here’s everything we talked about today: Our episode on Modern Monetary Theory “Ever heard of modern monetary theory?” from Marketplace “Who would benefit the most from student debt relief?” from Marketplace “One World, One Currency: Could It Work?” from Investopedia “Greater Idaho proposal faces friction in early results Tuesday” from Oregon Public Radio If you have a question for our hosts, email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at (508) 827-6278 or (508) U-B-SMART.
After the massacre in Uvalde, Texas, it’s easy to feel discouraged about guns in America because we’ve been here before, and little has changed. But one person who remains hopeful in times like these is Dr. Garen Wintemute. He heads the Violence Prevention Research Program at the University of California, Davis, and has been studying gun violence for decades. “Violence is a health problem,” he said. “It kills more people than motor vehicle injuries. And, yes, I’m constitutionally hopeful. But my hope is born out of having done this for 40 years.” On the show today, Wintemute walks us through some of the policies that could make a real difference, from “red flag” laws to universal background checks, and discusses why this time could be different despite the gun control gridlock in Washington. In the News Fix, the nation’s highest court is going to great lengths to find the person who leaked the draft opinion on overturning Roe v. Wade. Plus, if you’re tired of paying high gasoline prices, get used to it. We’ll explain why. Then, listeners sound off on Uvalde, and we all get smart about bourbon! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Heavily outspent, gun control groups still press their case” from Marketplace “The two paths Congress could take on gun control” from Vox “Meet the Doctor Who Gave $1 Million of His Own Money to Keep His Gun Research Going” from ProPublica “What research shows on the effectiveness of gun-control laws” from The Washington Post “Exclusive: Supreme Court leak investigation heats up as clerks are asked for phone records in unprecedented move” from CNN EU’s Ban on Russian Oil Adds Stress to Region’s Economies from The Wall Street Journal
At the end of a long week, it’s Friday. We talk about what changed then-President Donald Trump’s mind following his call for gun control after a shooter killed 23 people at an El Paso, Texas, Walmart. Plus, baseball teams use their social media platforms to speak out about gun violence. Before we go, our hosts ponder sharks, farmyard pets and more in a game of This or That. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Update on a possible outburst of meteors” from Sky & Telescope “After El Paso shooting, Trump pushed again on gun control. His aides talked him out of it.” from The New York Times “The Night the Yankees and Rays Didn’t Stick to Sports” from The Wall Street Journal “Undersea ‘sharkcano’ eruption captured in spectacular satellite images” from Live Science Tell us what you think about today’s show. Email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voice message at 508-827-6278, or 508-U-B-SMART.
Comments (37)

Luke

love this show

Apr 11th
Reply

ID21274754

Yay! So thrilled for Kimberly and all of us!

Mar 11th
Reply

Karen M

Download fails 😟

Jan 12th
Reply

craig potts

unable to download -- my podcast app says broken source

Nov 15th
Reply

ID21274754

FYI I couldn’t get this to play. I tried several times.

Nov 4th
Reply

Karen M

link seems broken. won't download

Nov 4th
Reply

ID21274754

LOVE “out of my nether regions!”

Oct 7th
Reply

ID21274754

I love Kai, except when he says “cray cray”

Sep 4th
Reply

ID21274754

Avenue Q! Thanks Molly!

May 8th
Reply

Laura F

Molly, you haven't listened to Throughline. July 15, 2020 episode

Jan 20th
Reply

Hasan Farahani

I most of the days listen to your fantastic podcast not because I care about the news, but because listening to the intro is the best thing can happen in a day.

Dec 15th
Reply

Andrea Bennett

can you talk about the vaccine on your Wednesday show? specifically are we going to need the cord vaccine every year? is it a one and done vaccine like the polio vaccine? thank you! love your show!

Dec 15th
Reply

Solomon Mars

oh my gosh Vampires vs. the Bronx has the same plot idea as a comic that was proposed by artist Ronald Wimberly a back in 2017! aww maaan

Oct 13th
Reply

Eric Everitt

wow Kai.. way to stick up for the milllions of men that single handly raise their kids, without mother's involved. Sexism to the max.

Sep 16th
Reply

Victor Lopez

I used to drink in a bar where the frosted mugs were so cold it would turn your beer to ice. Not the whole thing, but enough to ruin it. No cold glass!

Jul 11th
Reply (1)

Chris Horton

Wow!! This episode was mind blowing! Really made me think. The guest has a narrative that a lot of people should listen to.

Jul 1st
Reply

No Face

Will this show ever be about tech & the economy again? I'll unsub and check back after Christmas.

Jun 17th
Reply

Solomon Mars

episode error. it won't download.

May 27th
Reply

Megan Taylor

The source is bad

May 27th
Reply

Nellie Fly

He makes it so hard for me to keep being a fan.

May 12th
Reply
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