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Each weekday, Marketplace’s Kai Ryssdal and Kimberly Adams make today make sense. Along with our supersmart listeners, we break down happenings in tech, the economy and culture. Every Tuesday we bring on a guest to dive deeper into one important topic. Because none of us is as smart as all of us.
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Four years after the Internal Revenue Service created a tax credit to help struggling businesses get through the pandemic, the agency ultimately plans to reject the majority of claims filed under the program. We’ll explain how it became swamped with fraud. And, Major League Baseball legend Reggie Jackson opened up about the racism he and other Black players faced in the ’60s. We’ll get into it. And, we’ll play a round of Half Full / Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: “IRS says it will deny most claims of pandemic tax credit for employers” from The Washington Post “With pardons in Maryland, 2.5 million Americans will have marijuana convictions cleared or forgiven” from The Associated Press MLB Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson remembers Willie Mays from Gary Parrish on X “It’s Time to Stop Inviting Plus-Ones to Weddings” from The Atlantic “First Came ‘Spam.’ Now, With A.I., We’ve Got ‘Slop’” from The New York Times “Netflix House Will Let You Experience Your Favorite Shows, Movies in Real Life” from Netflix Tudum “What’s to become of summer Fridays in the age of hybrid work?” from CNN “Surgeon General: Why I’m Calling for a Warning Label on Social Media Platforms” from The New York Times We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
This week, senators grilled Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun about the aviation company’s safety culture and its retaliation against whistleblowers. But these problems are just the tip of the iceberg for Boeing. We’ll explain. Plus, why President Joe Biden’s new immigration plan is a big deal. And, who knew there were this many cricket fans in the U.S.? Here’s everything we talked about today: “Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun testifies before Senate committee on safety issues” from CNBC “‘Why haven’t you resigned?’ Senators torch Boeing CEO as he apologizes for deadly failures” from Politico “Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun Apologizes for Quality and Safety Issues at Senate Hearing” from The New York Times “Boeing’s CEO Search Hits Some Snags” from The Wall Street Journal “President Biden Announces Plan for Undocumented Spouses on DACA Anniversary” from C-SPAN “Biden immigration program offers legal status to 500,000 spouses of U.S. citizens. Here’s how it works.” from CBS News “The economy is roaring. Immigration is a key reason.” from The Washington Post “Supreme Court rejects challenge to tax on foreign corporate investments” from CNBC “The Supreme Court upholds a tax on foreign income over a challenge backed by business interests” from The Associated Press “The Supreme Court leaves a Trump-era offshore tax in place on investors” from NPR “Supreme Court Upholds Trump-Era Tax Provision” from The New York Times “ Rising Popularity of Cricket in US” from Bloomberg “Uber Drivers, Techies Score Wins for Team USA at ICC T20 World Cup 2024” from Bloomberg  “T20 World Cup: The USA cricket team is capturing hearts and minds with historic run” from CNN Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks and play a round of Half Full/Half Empty!
In honor of Juneteenth, we’re bringing you an episode of a new podcast from APM Studios that’s especially relevant on this holiday. In the podcast, “What Happened in Alabama?” host Lee Hawkins unpacks his family history, confronts cycles of trauma and grapples with an issue many Black families face: how to keep land in the family. This episode is about Black land loss. In 1910, Black farmers collectively owned over 16 million acres of farmland. A century later, over 90% of that land is no longer owned by Black farmers. Lee explores that tumultuous history and what Black families can do to hold on to their property. If you’d like to hear more episodes from the series, you can find “What Happened in Alabama?” wherever you get podcasts.
A recent survey found that almost 15% of Americans have co-bought a home with someone other than a romantic partner, and almost half said they’d consider it. This is part of a larger trend — many Americans are choosing to structure their lives around friends as opposed to a spouse or romantic partner. On the show today, Rhaina Cohen, author of “The Other Significant Others: Reimagining Life with Friendship at the Center,” explains what it really means to build your life around friends and the financial costs and benefits that come with it. Plus, how the LGBTQ+ community has shaped the conversation around the  issue. Then, we’ll unpack what baby boomers’ retirement readiness says about the wealth gap in the United States. And, the endless possibilities for crab emojis and why our intern, Thalia, was wrong about her curly hair. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Why more people are buying houses with their friends” from Axios “What If Friendship, Not Marriage, Was at the Center of Life?” from The Atlantic “Inflation Widens Married Couples’ Money Lead Over Their Single Friends” from The Wall Street Journal “Want financial security in America? Better get married.” from Vox “Two Women Redefine What it Means to Marry Your Best Friend” from The New York Times “If you can’t stay indoors during this US heat wave, here are a few ideas” from AP News “Northeast Heat Wave 2024: This Is a Disaster. Treat It That Way” from Bloomberg “US Retirement Accounts Are Flush for Millions of Older Americans” from Bloomberg We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
With the elections for president, the Senate and the House just 4½ months away, misinformation is on the rise. We’ll get into the kind of false narratives to look for on the campaign trail. Plus, how loopholes in medical billing underscore the importance of change at the state and local levels. And, the story of a remote-controlled robot that rescues swimmers in distress. Here’s everything we talked about today: Post about the Republican National Committee from Jay Nordlinger on X “Even Doctors Like Me Are Falling Into This Medical Bill Trap” from The New York Times “Watch a robot race over Lake Michigan waves to help a swimmer” from MLive “Which sentence do you think is grammatically correct?” from YouGov We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
A new pitch from former President Donald Trump calls for replacing income tax with tariffs. We’ll get into why the math doesn’t add up. Plus, chemical hair relaxers are making Black women sick, so why are they still being sold? And, we’ll weigh in on Apple entering the AI race, Hollywood studios buying movie theaters, and using speakerphone in public during a round of Half Full/Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: Post about Donald Trump’s “all tariffs policy” from Emily Wilkins on X “The Disturbing Truth About Hair Relaxers” from The New York Times “Alex Jones’ personal assets to be sold to pay $1.5B Sandy Hook debt. Company bankruptcy is dismissed” from The Associated Press “Why decaf coffee is growing in popularity” from Marketplace “Apple announces AI features” from Marketplace “Games Are Proving Their Pull on News and Tech Sites” from The New York Times  “Sony Pictures Acquires Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Landmark Deal That Puts Studios Back in Theater Game” from The Hollywood Reporter “Living Out Loud, Headphones Nowhere to Be Found” from The New York Times We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
About 15 million Americans collectively have $49 million in medical debt on their credit reports, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But a new proposed rule might remove these bills from their credit scores. We’ll explain. Plus, the domino effect of local elections being funded by national players. And, how Apple’s new AI features could change the language of emoji. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Vice President Kamala Harris On Sherri” from “Sherri” “CFPB Proposes to Ban Medical Bills from Credit Reports” from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau “CFPB Finds 15 Million Americans Have Medical Bills on Their Credit Reports” from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau “Biden Proposes Dropping Medical Debt From Credit Reports” from The New York Times “More parents are cosigning their kids’ mortgages” from Marketplace  “Co-Borrowing Is on the Rise for First-Time Homebuyers” from Freddie Mac  “Campaign donors hope money makes the difference in hotly contested states” from Marketplace “Apple Intelligence in 5 minutes” from Apple “Apple announces AI features” from Marketplace Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks, a game and more.
It’s a New York edition of “Make Me Smart”! Marketplace’s Kristin Schwab joins Kimberly in the NYC bureau to discuss a growing trend in the city that never sleeps: Nightlife is winding down a lot earlier these days, and that might be good for businesses. But first, why Tornado Alley may be migrating east, and a deeper look into the legal loopholes of campaign finance. Plus, the rescue of an orphaned baby elephant is making us smile. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Tornadoes shifting east in the U.S., study finds, putting more people at risk” from The Washington Post “Everything You Need to Know About the New ‘Twisters’ Movie” from Parade “$800K transfer from billionaire donor to US Chamber raises curtain on dark money” from The Hill “Reservations at 5 p.m.? Why the early bird dinner is cool again” from The Globe and Mail “Forget Partying Till the Wee Hours. Newlyweds Want to End Early.” from The New York Times “This dance party made for elder Millennials ends at 10pm” from Time Out “6 p.m. dinner reservations are losing their stigma” from Marketplace “The Rescue of Toto” from Sheldrick Wildlife Trust “African elephants address one another with individually specific name-like calls” from Nature Ecology & Evolution “Scientists used AI to figure out elephants have names for themselves” from Business Insider We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
It’s decision season for the U.S. Supreme Court, meaning the court is weighing in on a slew of cases dealing with a wide range of issues, including abortion medication restrictions and the power of federal agencies. One legal doctrine has become more and more influential in that decision-making: originalism. But Madiba Dennie, author of the new book “The Originalism Trap: How Extremists Stole the Constitution and How We the People Can Take It Back,” calls that a relatively recent phenomenon. On the show today, Dennie explains what originalism is, how it gained a foothold in American legal thought and why she believes its rise has eroded Americans’ rights and threatened economic stability. Plus, her idea for how we move forward. Then, we’ll get into the movie-worthy story of an African American man who escaped slavery and became a fierce critic of the Constitution. Plus, Patrick Schumacker, an executive producer of the TV series “Abbott Elementary,” answers the Make Me Smart question. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Throw Originalism Out. It’s Time for Inclusive Constitutionalism.” from Slate “Originalism, Amy Coney Barrett’s approach to the Constitution, explained” from Vox “Even the Founders Didn’t Believe in Originalism” from The Atlantic “What is originalism? Did it underpin the Supreme Court’s ruling on abortion and guns? Debunking the myths” from The Conversation “The biggest 2024 Supreme Court rulings so far, and what’s still to come” from The Washington Post “A Furious, Forgotten Slave Narrative Resurfaces After Nearly 170 Years” from The New York Times “Facebook owner Meta seeks to train AI model on European data as it faces privacy concerns” from AP News What have you been wrong about lately? Let us know at makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
The main channel into the Port of Baltimore is expected to reopen soon, but the city is still dealing with the aftermath of the collapse of Francis Scott Key Bridge in late March. Guest host Amy Scott explains how the port’s closure has affected global supply chains, shipping container costs and life in Baltimore. Plus, a shake-up at the Federal Election Commission is making certain gray areas of campaign finance even grayer. Then, we’ll celebrate the first transgender and Asian American woman to be crowned Miss Maryland USA. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Full channel into Port of Baltimore expected to open ‘in the next few days,’ officials say” from The Baltimore Sun “With widened channel, port seeks to recover traffic lost after Key Bridge collapse” from The Baltimore Sun “Sudden container crunch sends ocean freight rates soaring, setting off global trade alarm bells” from CNBC “How the Federal Election Commission Went From Deadlock to Deregulation” from The New York Times “Bailey Anne Kennedy: Trans woman wins Miss Maryland USA, makes pageant history” from The Baltimore Banner “Gen Z Plumbers and Construction Workers Are Making #BlueCollar Cool” from The Wall Street Journal “A labor shortage stands in the way of the clean energy transition” from Marketplace We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
It’s Friday, folks! Today we’re talking about some news coming from former President Donald Trump, who has vowed to take away key spending powers from Congress if reelected. We’ll get into what that would mean in practice. Plus, we’ll talk through the latest from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which just announced it’ll be decreasing the number of households surveyed for important reports like the monthly jobs report. It’s a move that will make decoding what’s going on in our economy more a little more challenging. Plus, we’ll get into Bazooka gum, the rise of Uncrustables and Forever Stamps getting more expensive during a round of Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “US Jobs Household Survey Size to Be Cut Due to Budget Constraints” from Bloomberg “Trump plans to claim sweeping powers to cancel federal spending” from The Washington Post  “Does Texas need its own stock exchange?” from Marketplace “From school cafeterias to professional athletes, Uncrustables sandwiches are everywhere” from Marketplace “Bazooka Candy’s CEO on the brand’s sweet athlete investment deal” from Marketplace “Some New Yorkers are pushing for open streets to be permanent” from Marketplace “Forever stamps are about to get more expensive — again” from Marketplace We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
The European Central Bank is joining Canada in cutting interest rates after months and months of holding them steady. But the U.S. Federal Reserve isn’t likely to follow suit, at least not yet. We’ll explain why. Then, we’ll dig deeper into the political and financial motivations for New York Gov. Kathy Hochul’s abrupt decision to block congestion pricing in New York City. Plus, what antitrust investigations into Nvidia, Microsoft and OpenAI could mean for AI mania. Here’s everything we talked about today: “European Central Bank Cuts Interest Rates for the First Time Since 2019” from The New York Times “ECB: Interest rates are coming down in Europe. The Fed won’t follow yet” from CNN “Canada becomes first G7 nation to cut interest rates” from Reuters “Advocates for congestion pricing want Governor Hochul to think about long-term benefits” from ABC7 New York “Big Auto And The Death Of Traffic Congestion Reform” from The Lever  “Banerji: Seeing a true mania in Nvidia and meme stock trading” from CNBC “Angel Reese: People watch WNBA for me too, not just one person!” from ESPN “The ugly discourse surrounding Caitlin Clark” from The Washington Post Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks, and play a round of Half Full/Half Empty!
Triple-digit heat waves are spreading across the Southwest, and many incarcerated people have to endure the extreme weather without air conditioning. We’ll get into why state legislatures have been slow to address the problem and why it’ll only get worse as temperatures rise. Plus, we’ll get into New York Governor Kathy Hochul’s last minute switch-up on congestion pricing. And, the story of a TikTok influencer treating day laborers to days off at Disneyland is making us smile. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Hochul Halts Congestion Pricing in a Stunning 11th-Hour Shift” from The New York Times “A year of record global heat has pushed Earth closer to dangerous threshold” from The Washington Post “‘Cooking someone to death’: Southern states resist calls to add air conditioning to prisons” from Politico “This 27-year-old keeps taking day laborers to Disneyland. One thing always catches his attention” from CNN “Boeing Starliner launches 2 NASA astronauts into space in first piloted test flight” from Fox Business We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
With the 2024 election only five months away, polls abound. But since 2016, polls have had somewhat of a bad rap, and many Americans have become skeptical of their reliability. David Dutwin, senior vice president of strategic initiatives at NORC at the University of Chicago, said we’re thinking about polls all wrong. On the show today, Dutwin explains what polls can and can’t tell us, how to spot a high-quality poll and what kind of role polling should play in our understanding of elections. Plus, what’s keeping pollsters up at night. Then, we’ll talk about how the Joe Biden administration is addressing an issue that’s top of mind, according to a new Gallup survey: immigration. And, a Half Full/Half Empty update on the job market. Later, one listener’s small-scale solution to the Big Food problem, and a divisive grammar debate. Plus, a listener was wrong about the meaning of “vibecession.” Here’s everything we talked about today: “What Can Election 2024 Polls Really Tell Us?” from Scientific American “Polling in 2024” from Reuters View the latest national polls from FiveThirtyEight “Public Opinion Polling Basics” from Pew Research Center “We still don’t know much about this election — except that the media and pollsters blew it again” from The Washington Post “US Job Openings Fall to Lowest Since 2021 in Broad Cooldown” from Bloomberg   “Immigration Named Top U.S. Problem for Third Straight Month” from Gallup “Biden issues new executive action: Much of southern border to close at midnight” from Politico  “Biden prepares an order that would shut down asylum requests at US-Mexico border” from The Associated Press “Kyla Scanlon wants to remind us that ‘people are the economy’” from Marketplace We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
The results of a new Bloomberg poll indicate that the markets suspect a second Trump presidency would put the Federal Reserve’s independence in jeopardy. We’ll get into what the former president’s advisors have said about his plans for the central bank. And, Republicans are gearing up to challenge upcoming election results while Democrats prepare to counter those lawsuits. Plus, why we want to be Simone Biles when we grow up. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Launch of NASA Astronauts in Boeing’s Starliner Is Scrubbed” from The New York Times “A Trump Win Would Threaten Fed Independence, Move Bonds: Poll” from Bloomberg “Washington Journal: Stephen Moore on Economic Issues and Campaign 2024” from C-SPAN “The legal fight over the 2024 election has begun” from Axios “Congress Just Made It Basically Impossible to Track Taylor Swift’s Private Jet” from Gizmodo “Clarence Thomas Secretly Accepted Luxury Trips From GOP Donor” from ProPublica “Simone Biles cruises to 9th national title and gives Olympic champ Sunisa Lee a boost along the way” from The Associated Press We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
The latest data from the Federal Reserve’s favorite inflation measure hinted that inflation is cooling. But the Fed is still on guard, meaning higher interest rates for longer than many had expected. We’ll get into how that will likely be felt differently by Americans at opposite ends of the income spectrum. Then, we’ll get into the risky return of zero-down mortgages. Plus, we’ll weigh in on Chevy Malibus and merch during a round of Half Full/Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Inflation Remains Steady, With Signs of Further Cooling” from The New York Times “Zero-down mortgages are making a comeback” from CNN “CFPB Launches Inquiry into Junk Fees in Mortgage Closing Costs” from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau “GM to discontinue the Chevy Malibu later this year” from Marketplace “Zoom cashiers may signal a new era of digital offshoring and remote work” from Marketplace “Venice’s new admission fee cannot curb overtourism” from The Economist “Chobani Yogurt Founder Buys Anchor Brewing Company” from The New York Times “The End of Merch” from GQ We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
A former OpenAI board member dropped a bombshell allegation about CEO Sam Altman and the company’s ethics. But this isn’t the first time employees have expressed safety concerns about the company. We’ll explain. Plus, a new rule aims to protect buy now, pay later users. And, how college sports might finally get recognized as a multibillion-dollar business. Here’s everything we talked about today: “The Golden Triangle: How the CHIPS Act is changing one Arizona neighborhood” from Marketplace “What really went down at OpenAI and the future of regulation w/ Helen Toner” from The TED AI Show “Former OpenAI board member explains why they fired Sam Altman” from The Verge “Commissioner Sankey: ‘There’s no better time to be a student-athlete’” from SEC Sports “What to know about House v. NCAA settlement and a historic day for college sports” from The New York Times “Klarna CEO on CFPB declaration: Wise to put regulations around this” from CNBC “CFPB Takes Action to Ensure Consumers Can Dispute Charges and Obtain Refunds on Buy Now, Pay Later Loans” from Consumer Financial Protection Bureau “Buy now, pay later debt grows but is hidden from credit bureaus” from Marketplace Join us tomorrow for Economics on Tap! The YouTube livestream starts at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time, 6:30 p.m. Eastern. We’ll have news, drinks and play a round of Half Full/Half Empty.
A Trump-Musk bromance

A Trump-Musk bromance

2024-05-2911:341

After years of having a frosty relationship, Elon Musk and Donald Trump are warming up to each other. We’ll discuss what a potential political marriage might mean for a second Trump administration. Plus, who actually donates to political campaigns? Later, we’ll smile about two giant pandas returning to D.C.’s National Zoo! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Fewer Americans to Make Political Donations in 2024” from LendingTree  “Fewer Americans plan to donate to political campaigns: Survey” from The Hill “Inside Donald Trump and Elon Musk’s Growing Alliance” from The Wall Street Journal “Two New Giant Pandas Coming to Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute From China by End of the Year” from the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute “The Pandas Are Coming!” from the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute “Latest North Korean Offensive: Dumping Trash on South Korea From the Sky” from The New York Times We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
Today we’re talking about food. Specifically, Big Food. In his book, “Barons: Money, Power, and the Corruption of America’s Food Industry,” Austin Frerick, agricultural and antitrust policy fellow at Yale, argues the food system is the most consolidated sector in the United States. On the show today, Frerick explains how the American food system became so concentrated, how that’s inflated prices and eroded quality, and what we should do about it. Plus, Walmart’s role as king of grocery kings. Then, we’ll get into why Boeing can’t keep up with SpaceX. And, an expert on youth mental health (and former guest on “Make Me Smart”) was wrong about how teens curate their social media feeds. Here’s everything else we talked about today: “Lax Antitrust Enforcement Imperils The Nation’s Supply Chains” from Forbes “What Is “Big Ag,” and Why Should You Be Worried About Them?” from Union of Concerned Scientists “The problem with growing corporate concentration and power in the global food system” from Nature Food “Major retailers are offering summer deals to entice inflation-weary shoppers” from AP News “US Consumer Confidence Rises for First Time in Four Months” from Bloomberg “Inflation now means high prices, not just rising costs” from Axios “What do Americans think about inflation?” from The Brookings Institution “Boeing Prepared to Fly Crewed Space Taxi With Helium Leak” from Bloomberg We love to hear from you. Send your questions and comments to makemesmart@marketplace.org or leave us a voicemail at 508-U-B-SMART.
More tariffs from the Joe Biden administration on Chinese goods are on the way, and he gave his blessing to some Trump-era tariffs. We’ll break it down. Plus, why a story about a local public library becoming an adults-only space may be a warning of things to come. Later, we’ll weigh in on Chuck E. Cheese’s animatronic band, whales sinking yachts and “quiet vacationing” during a round of Half Full / Half Empty! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Biden Extends Tariff Exemptions on Some Imports From China” from Bloomberg “Donnelly Public Library announces it will become adults-only library, cites Idaho Legislature’s library bill” from KTVB “Employers can offer a new benefit: Matching student loan payments with 401(k) contributions” from Marketplace “After Outcry, Chuck E. Cheese Says It Will Keep More Animatronic Bands” from The New York Times “The Mad Scientist and the Killer Whales” from Rolling Stone “The restaurant reservation resale game is on the rise in New York City” from Marketplace “Some younger workers are ‘quiet vacationing’ rather than using PTO” from Marketplace Time is running out! Donate today to help us reach our fundraising goal and support public service journalism for all: support.marketplace.org/smart-sn
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Comments (41)

Habia Khet

💚WATCH>>ᗪOᗯᑎᒪOᗩᗪ>>LINK>👉https://co.fastmovies.org

Feb 5th
Reply

Aakash Amanat

I love the idea behind "Make Me Smart"! In a world where information is constantly evolving, it's crucial to keep up with the latest insights and trends. This forum seems like the perfect place to exchange ideas and learn from each other. To truly be "smart," I believe it's important to cultivate a curious mindset. Don't be afraid to ask questions, challenge assumptions, and dive deep into topics that intrigue you. Whether it's discussing technological advancements, exploring scientific breakthroughs, or understanding complex social issues, this forum can be a valuable resource for expanding our knowledge. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/19yAqHHTdNLF0_Pp5Yd_KIyZxxZ2oNCPu9S6cbdKwg8Y/edit?usp=sharing

Aug 21st
Reply

ID21274754

I too have been listening since episode 1! My favorite podcast.

May 4th
Reply

Chris Horton

Purrrfect ending

Aug 19th
Reply

Luke

love this show

Apr 11th
Reply

ID21274754

Yay! So thrilled for Kimberly and all of us!

Mar 11th
Reply

Karen M

Download fails 😟

Jan 12th
Reply

craig potts

unable to download -- my podcast app says broken source

Nov 15th
Reply

ID21274754

FYI I couldn’t get this to play. I tried several times.

Nov 4th
Reply

Karen M

link seems broken. won't download

Nov 4th
Reply

ID21274754

LOVE “out of my nether regions!”

Oct 7th
Reply

ID21274754

I love Kai, except when he says “cray cray”

Sep 4th
Reply

ID21274754

Avenue Q! Thanks Molly!

May 8th
Reply

Laura F

Molly, you haven't listened to Throughline. July 15, 2020 episode

Jan 20th
Reply

Hasan Farahani

I most of the days listen to your fantastic podcast not because I care about the news, but because listening to the intro is the best thing can happen in a day.

Dec 15th
Reply

Andrea Bennett

can you talk about the vaccine on your Wednesday show? specifically are we going to need the cord vaccine every year? is it a one and done vaccine like the polio vaccine? thank you! love your show!

Dec 15th
Reply

Solomon Mars

oh my gosh Vampires vs. the Bronx has the same plot idea as a comic that was proposed by artist Ronald Wimberly a back in 2017! aww maaan

Oct 13th
Reply

Eric Everitt

wow Kai.. way to stick up for the milllions of men that single handly raise their kids, without mother's involved. Sexism to the max.

Sep 16th
Reply

Victor Lopez

I used to drink in a bar where the frosted mugs were so cold it would turn your beer to ice. Not the whole thing, but enough to ruin it. No cold glass!

Jul 11th
Reply (1)

Chris Horton

Wow!! This episode was mind blowing! Really made me think. The guest has a narrative that a lot of people should listen to.

Jul 1st
Reply