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In any trading market, at any time in history, no matter where you are, the most important thing you can possess isn’t actually money, or influence, or anything like that. Knowledge -- in particular, knowing something before everybody else -- is far more valuable. Some traders are willing to go to great lengths to get it before anyone else. In some cases, they’ll apply great ingenuity to the problem - but in others, they’ll use manipulation -- hacking into these technologies to gain an unfair advantage, and make a fortune along the way.
The name Lulzsec is probably very familiar to listeners who were around in 2011, when this hacking group was at the peak of its nefarious activity. As their name implies, Lulzsec was known for trolling their victims: their childish behavior might have fooled some people into thinking that Lulzsec was mostly harmless - but as the story you’re about to hear will show, they were anything but.
The US government says that Kim Schmitz, better know as Kim DotCom, is the leader of a file sharing crime ring. He sees himself as a an internet freedom fighter: a fugitive on the run from vindictive overly-powerful governments. Can King Kimble escape the wrath of the USA?
Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) is usually considered a better solution for authentication than just using passwords. But Roger Grimes, a veteran security professional, and a Data-Driven Defense Evangelist claims that the sense of security current MFA solutions provides us - is false.
Language models are everywhere today: they run in the background of Google Translate and other translation tools; they help operate voice assistants like Alexa or Siri; and most interestingly, they are available via several experiential projects trying to emulate natural conversations, such as OpenAI’s GPT-3 and Google’s LaMDA. Can these models be hacked to gain access to the sensitive information they learned from their training data?
In May 2021, Following the Solarwinds and the Colonial Pipeline attacks, the Biden administration published a presidential Executive Order mandating the use of SBOMs - Software Bill of Materials - in all government agencies. What are SBOMs and how useful are they in cybersecurity? Nate Nelson talks to two experts: Allan Friedman (CISA) and Chris Blask (Cybeats).
Criminals, particularly cyber criminals, aren’t “good” people; in most cases, they do have their own personal boundaries. Every once in a while, you encounter a criminal who’s different. Someone who seems not to have limits at all. A ruthless person, for whom the goal truly justifies the means. Leo Kuvayev is that kind of a person - and that made him so successful as a cyber-criminal. But even a genius criminal can go just one step too far.
Railway systems are a mess of old systems built on top of older systems, running ancient operating systems and exposing their most sensitive inner workings to commuters via WIFI. Why are railway systems so difficult to defend, and what are the most probable attack vectors against them? Nate Nelson, our senior producer, speaks with Israel Baron, Israel Railway's first ever CISO.
The Anom was the holy grail of dark, illegal communication: a mobile phone that could send encrypted messages, and even included a secret Kill-Switch to foil attempts by law enforcement agents to get to its contents. Thousands of criminals used the Anom, certain that they were completely safe from the police... They were wrong.
Ken Thompson is a legendary computer scientist who also made a seminal contribution to computer security in 1983, when he described a nifty hack that could allow an attacker to plant an almost undetectable malicious code inside a C compiler. Surprisingly, it turns out a very similar hack was also used in the Solarwinds attack.
Silk Road’s success did more than bring the site more sellers and buyers, it also brought it more attention from law enforcement agencies as well as malicious hackers and other shady characters. Some of these shady characters, it turns out, were part of the task force aiming to shut down Silk Road...
Your organization was hit by ransomware, and it is now time to reach out to the hackers and negotiate the terms of a deal that will bring back your data, and (hopefully) won’t leave the company’s coffers empty. But before you sit down in front of your computer and fire off a message to the hackers - stop. Are you sure that you know what you’re doing? Are you certain that you won’t screw up the negotiations and do more harm than good?
Ross Ulbricht always had a thing with testing his limits. He was also an avid libertarian who wanted to change the world. And so, in 2010, he came up with the idea to build a truly free market: a website where anybody can buy and sell anything - including illegal drugs - anonymously: the ultimate experiment in individual freedom.
Will BitCoin and the other cryptocurrencies be able to replace money as we know it today? will governments embrace a future where they have no control over their currencies? Jacob Goldstein (Planet Money, What's Your Problem) talks to Nate Nelson about what the future holds for BitCoin.
Years before credit cards transactions gave banks and data-brokers free access to our private financial information, a man named David Chaum became the first person to really, materially grapple with the problem of privacy in money. His ideas inspired a movement of "Crypto Anarchists" who aspired to change money, forever.
A recording of last week's special Malicious Live Ask Us Anything event: How did Malicious Life come to be? How do we choose the stories we tell, who was Ran's most memorable guest - and why does Nate keep inserting weird names into the scripts?...
In June 2011, a Con Edison truck was parked outside of Hector Monsegur's New York apartment, every day for over a week. But Hector - better known as Sabu, the ringleader of the LulzSec hacking group -wasn't fooled: he guessed, correctly, that the FBI was on to him. But it turned out that of all the people who broke or disregarded the law in this particular story, only one man had a reason to worried: Jeremy Hammond.
George Friedman and Jeremy Hammond are two very different people: the former is a capitalist middleman, the latter an anarchist-communist hacker. A spy - and a hacker. But in certain respects, they’re actually quite similar: in what lines are they willing to cross to get to their goal.
AbdelKader Curnelius, a German Threat Researcher and an expert on the cybercrime ecosystem in German-speaking countries - shares a story about how he helped the German police put a sophisticated local cybercriminal behind bars, by uncovering tiny mistakes that this hacker did in the past.
In June 2012, an anonymous hacker posted a list of 6.5 Million encrypted passwords belonging to LinkedIn users on a Russian hacker forum. It was soon discovered that these passwords were hashed using an outdated and vulnerable hashing algorithm - and were also unsalted. The lawsuits followed suit shortly… what is 'hashing' and 'salting', and can we trust big organizations to keep our secrets safe?
Comments (76)

Poops

yes

Sep 20th
Reply

Poops

Stuxnet #1. USA, USA. USA.

Apr 26th
Reply

Jorel

Could someone translate what this guy is saying? I hear words but there is no meaning to them

Apr 2nd
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Jeffery Gray

this podcast promotes deep state propaganda, they know is propaganda...

Jan 20th
Reply

Joel Prokopchuk

This title reminds me of a comic strip from the UserFriendly comic, where a fed up BOfH sends missiles at a particularly annoying spammer.

Jan 12th
Reply

Andy Edwards

wonder if cyber Eason/ML will ever speak out about NSO like Jack Rhysider has

Nov 28th
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Gerrit van Rensburg

Hey Ran & Team, Could you cover the Hauwei case? it's been on-going for a while and has huge geo-politcal consequences! love the show!

Sep 24th
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lavericklavericklave

the story is total garbage. just happens to find some papers with two board members being fired lying around on someones desk. come on

Mar 15th
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Mirek Rumin

I can't believe that's how the extra story ends... Wth!?

Jan 16th
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Gurdeep Mundi

whoa!

Jan 12th
Reply

Chauncey Bones

congratulations on hitting the century mark! really enjoyed the Act I, II, III format and content. had a few laughs listening and got a bit nostalgic. has ML thought about more election hacking? the April 2020 South Korean legislation involved Huawei and was quite shady. keep ☝ the great work and Happy New Year!

Dec 23rd
Reply

🤨

man ... you produced this before the election! That's some foresight!

Dec 19th
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Clinton Knight

I think I know Jan Sloot's Data Compression System method. And honestly, its stupidly simple. No wonder there was no storage.

Dec 7th
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Beano09

Hi

Dec 4th
Reply

Beano09

Hi

Dec 4th
Reply

Chauncey Bones

y'all nailed it. what a shit show ladies and gents sit back and enjoy your pop corn

Nov 7th
Reply (1)

Chauncey Bones

and thats why I still have aol mail. ahhhhh the days of yore. not mentioned in the pod was a yahoo ceo died stranded in winter trying to help his stranded family. related? maybe not but possibly malicious........ love the pods Ran!

Oct 10th
Reply (1)

Chauncey Bones

dank pod cast i get to play judge. me sees this..... Crisco i mean Cisco, if they knew international law was about to be broken, and most corporations do, it wouldn't do well in Hague. Perhaps the case in the US is just an amuse bouche for the global court and the plaintiffs are exposing Sullivan's hand. this case in the States will depend on November third sadly but Crisco should stop using Cisco

Aug 30th
Reply

Andy Edwards

There's a flip side to maintaining that anonymity: seems like it's possible the source for the leaks could have been killed and the journalists wouldn't know about it. I wonder if they were still able to contact the source long after the fact? It seems like that would be a huge risk in itself. So I'm guessing it's hard to verify whether the security measures were successful...

Aug 12th
Reply

Bonnieandclyde15@protonmail.com

I love my huawei p20pro! The US has every root to be scared. They make incredible products

Aug 6th
Reply
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