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Humans do a lot to keep our teeth clean! We brush them twice a day, we (hopefully!) remember to floss, and we visit the dentist regularly. But what about animals? Do they have to clean their teeth, too? And if they do…how do they do it? We talked to Barbara Toddes from the Philadelphia Zoo to find the answer.  Got a question that’s on the tip of your tongue? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll brush up on the answer.
Every animal needs to rest, but they do it in lots of different ways. Some sleep in beds, some on the ground, some in trees, and some … in the ocean! But how do animals like dolphins and whales catch their zzz’s at sea? We asked marine biologist Roxanne Beltran to help us find the answer. Got a question that’s making waves in your brain? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll fish out the answer!   
Ginkgo trees are seriously impressive. They’re the oldest plant on earth – even older than dinosaurs! They can grow up to 100 feet tall, and in the fall their leaves turn a brilliant golden color. There’s just one drawback – sometimes, they really stink! But why are these majestic trees so smelly? We reached out to tree researcher Natalie Love to get the answer.  Got a question you’ve been stink-ing hard about? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact and we’ll sniff out the answer!
Why do we blush?

Why do we blush?

2023-01-2405:58

Do you ever blush? Most of us do! Maybe it happens when you’re excited, or angry or embarrassed. But what causes our cheeks to turn pink, and why do we do it? We talked to pediatrician Kathryn Less to get the answer! Got a question that you’re ready to face? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll blush up on the answer.
A star is a big, glowing ball of hot gas that is held together by its own gravity. But what happens if that big ball of hot gas explodes? We asked space scientist Maggie Aderin-Pocock to help us find the answer. Got a super hot question? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help explode your mind with the answer! 
How do planets form?

How do planets form?

2023-01-2006:35

Happy Planet Week! There are so many incredible planets out there, from giant Jupiter with its swirling storms to Saturn and its mesmerizing rings. Plus, there are countless other planets that humans have yet to discover! But how exactly do these cosmic wonders come to be? We asked geologist Yesenia Arroyo to help us find the answer. Got a question forming in your mind? Launch it over to us at BrainsOn.org/contact and it’ll be the center of our universe!
On Earth, the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. But what about other planets? Do they have cardinal directions like north, south, east and west, too? We asked geologist Yesenia Arroyo to help us find the answer. Got a question that’s left you feeling lost? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help point you in the right direction!
Happy Planet Week! Jupiter has a lot going for it. It’s the biggest planet in the solar system and NASA even has a spacecraft named Juno orbiting it to learn more about the hugest of the gas giants. But there’s still a lot we don’t know about it. Which made us wonder, what would happen if we lit a match on Jupiter? We asked geologist Yesenia Arroyo to help us find the answer. Got a question that’s orbiting your brain? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help propel it to the nearest answer. 
Happy Planet Week! Did you know the Earth’s outer layer has big rocky sheets called tectonic plates that move back and forth up to six inches every year? As they move, these wiggly jiggly plates can create mountain ranges, cause volcanoes to erupt, and sometimes trigger earthquakes! But do other planets have tectonic plates, too? We asked geologist Yesenia Arroyo to help us find the answer. Got a question shifting around in your brain? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll plate up the answer!
Happy Planet Week! Everybody knows Jupiter is the largest planet in our solar system, Venus is the hottest and Saturn is the best accessorized! It boasts seven gorgeous, gassy rings. But do they serve a purpose other than scoring style points? We asked geologist Yesenia Arroyo to help us find the answer. Got a question that’s ringing in your head? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help b-RING you the answer.
Have you ever been to a hypnotist show where someone “puts people to sleep” and then their behavior is changed in some way? Is that real, and if so, how does it work? We asked counselor Enakshi Choudhuri to help us find the answer. Hypnotized by a great question? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll blow your mind with the answer!
You wouldn’t think a simple piece of paper would be anything to worry about. It’s flimsy and harmless, right? Not if it cuts you! OUCH! Even though paper cuts are so tiny, they hurt like the dickens! Why is that? We asked pediatrician Kathryn Less to help us find the answer. Have you putyour finger on a great question? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help cut it to the core! 
Lasers are very powerful beams of light. You can't just turn on a flashlight or lamp to make a laser. So how intense does the light have to be? We asked mechanical engineering professor Sayan Biswas to help us find the answer. Got a question that you’re laser-focused on? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll beam with joy at the thought of helping you! 
Big ones, small ones, cute ones, leggy ones. Is that the extent of your spider knowledge? Then this is the episode for you! We asked biologist Andrew Gordus of Johns Hopkins University to help us figure out how many types of spiders there are.  Got a question that’s just your type? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll search the web for someone to answer it!
Why do seals arf?

Why do seals arf?

2023-01-0906:43

Seals and sea lions are closely-related, ocean-dwelling mammals that have a lot to say! They make all kinds of noises, from barks to roars to grunts and squeaks. But what does all that mean? Are they communicating with other species? Are they telling secrets about crabs? We asked marine biologist and animal behavioral scientist Roxanne Beltran to help us find the answer. Got a question that’s swimming through your brain? Send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact, and we’ll help seal the deal with an answer. 
Bird eggs come in lots of different colors: white, brown, green, lavender, pink, and more. Splotches and speckles abound, too. If you’re in North America, maybe you’ve seen tiny bright blue robin’s eggs in a springtime nest. But did you ever wonder what makes that blue color? And why are robin’s eggs blue in the first place? We talked to biologist Bob Montgomerie about the reason for the hue.  If you’ve got a Moment of Um question that’s cracking you up, send it to the egg-heads at BrainsOn.org/contact and we’ll scramble to find the answer.
From glow-in-the-dark stickers to bioluminescent bacteria, twinkling fireflies to radiant jellyfish, the world is full of things that have the power to shine a light in the darkness. But how do glow-in-the-dark things actually work? We asked chemistry professor Aleeta M. Powe to illuminate this question for us.  If you’ve got a question that we could shine some light on, send it to us at BrainsOn.org/contact and we’ll do our best to brighten your day.
We take pencils for granted. They’re kicked around, thrown in the garbage and chewed on like yesterday's fast food. But think about how integral they are to our lives. They help us create art and write letters. They are vital tools of communication. With the help of Joya Cooley, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Cal State Fullerton, we pay respect to the humble pencil. Not only does she reveal how it sticks to paper, but she also tells us the secrets of erasing too. We’d love to hear your Moment of Um question too! Just go to BrainsOn.org/contact to submit it, and you could hear the answer in a future episode.
The T. rex is the embodiment of ferocious: razor sharp teeth, claws and a taste for blood. If you were running away from one of these beasts, you might not even notice its tiny arms. But there they are, in every recreation, almost comically small arms. So what gives? Paleontologist Bhart-Anjan Bhullar sets us straight on this not-so-tiny question. Do you have a head-scratcher you want us to answer? Unlike T. rex, you can scratch your head, and when you’re done, submit your Moment of Um question at BrainsOn.org/contact.
Giraffes are known for a few key features: their long necks, beautiful camouflage and the dark tongue they use to strip leaves off branches. Steve Gerkin, interpretive programs manager at the North Carolina Zoo, visits the show to tell us why we think their tongues are that shade. Hint: humans share this trait with giraffes! Do you have a head-scratcher you want us to answer? Submit your own Moment of Um questions atBrainsOn.org/contact.
Comments (7)

Jack Mandel

sorry for the incoveniance

Nov 23rd
Reply

Mora Petshop

everyone do not ge mean like jack up there ok its a bad behavior

Jun 3rd
Reply

Jack Mandel

Sandin is ugly and I hate this podcast!THER SOOOOOOO DUMB I HATE THEM SOOOOOO MUCH!HELPPP MEEEEEEEEE STOPPPPP PLEASEEEE NOOOOOOOOOO!

Mar 25th
Reply (4)
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