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Organize 365 Podcast

Author: Lisa Woodruff

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Lisa Woodruff is a home organization expert, productivity specialist, and author of multiple books including The Paper Solution.

Lisa’s research-based teaching shines a light on the invisible work being done at home and in the workplace. Lisa’s sensible and doable organizing tasks appeal to multiple generations. Her candor and relatable style make you feel she is right there beside you, helping you get organized as you laugh and cry together.

Lisa believes organization is not a skill you are born with. It is a skill that is developed over time and changes with each season of life. Lisa has helped thousands of women reclaim their homes and finally get organized with her practical tips, encouragement, and humor through her blog and podcast at Organize365.com.
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Sorry, I got a little long winded in that last podcast. But you know, the podcast where I talk about your 30s and 40s I can speak to you more authoritatively about because I have lived it. A lot of what I’m saying from here forward is speculation and purely observational. Some things you have to just experience to understand - like giving birth! Being in your 50s is so freeing because you realize that no one is paying attention to what you are doing. They’re worried about themselves, thinking about their own lives, their own dreams, their own hopes, ambitions, time, money, energy and capacity. Chasing who you are uniquely created to be and running after your own uniqueness and becoming as excellent as possible in the thing that you were gifted and created to do is like the rest of my life’s mission.  In your 20s there’s so many possibilities - try it all. In your 30s, you need to be an independent adult. In your 40s you go ok, well…I tried a lot of things in my 20s and 30s and these things aren’t moving into the second half of my life so they need to be decluttered, not only physically but mentally. I think there’s an extended new phase of life here, I’m going to call it “Emerging Uniqueness.” Women today in their 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s have big plans, lofty plans. They love what they are doing and the impact they’re making. Your 50s are a Golden Window…a Golden Decade! If you had your children in your late 30s, this window will shift to later. So where you have your children (if you have them at all) does create where your fixed expenses and time constraints are going to be.  The theme of the 50s to me so far and what I’m observing is that women aren’t done. We haven’t even really gotten started, to be honest. We want to be on the list - on the to do list. Like, we would like to be above the dog. Once you’re decluttered and organized, you have a lot of capacity for the unexpected demands on your time and your money because you know how to move things around mentally and physically on your calendar in order to create the capacity when needed. I think that adulthood is self care. It has nothing to do with bubble baths, spas or whatever. Self care is taking care of yourself. In childhood, your parents took care of you. In emerging adulthood, you’re in between your parents and taking care of yourself. Now is your time.  What is our purpose or our job in this phase of life? Self care. Taking care of yourself and prioritizing yourself, in addition to everyone else that lives in your household. Planning - planning for you and what you’re doing next and continuing to dream - that is your purpose. What is your capacity? HUGE. Huge capacity, income, earning, time, and 50 years worth of knowledge. How do we use the physical spaces in our home? You understand time capacity now. You understand how limited it is, but also how exponential it is. So, just get your homework done. Once your physical spaces are decluttered and organized, you’re not in accumulation anymore - so it will stay maintained. What scaffolding or support do we need to make this phase of life easier and more productive? Once you’ve done The Productive Home Solution® and The Paper Solution®, what you need is Planning Day. Not only will Planning Days help you plan the next 120 days, it will encourage you, inspire you, motivate you, and hold you accountable to keep growing, reaching further, and dreaming about what is possible. Make a list of the things that you want to do, be, and have in the second half of your life…and then start going after it!  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Productive Home Solution® The Paper Solution® The Sunday Basket® Home Planning Day Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
This is the recap of Day 1. I was driving to Jayme to teach the first workshop for her teachers about the Teacher Friday Workbox®. I’d been having conversations with other schools about implementing the Teacher Program in their schools. I was shocked by the one thing holding them back. The honest feedback I was receiving was that they were afraid they’d be shedding light on how overworked the teachers were and they knew the staff was resentful and considering quitting. They were afraid that making visible all of the invisible work they do would give them reason to submit their resignation!  You’re Not Alone And You’re Not Crazy I shared this feedback with Jayme who laughed. “They already know they are overworked!”  Jayme’s staff had two reactions to the Teacher Friday Workbox®. Some (especially new faculty) were afraid to do it wrong. Jayme assured them if they were just doing something they were doing it right. And the others had epiphanies saying, “I’m not crazy, and I’m not alone.” Those teachers discovered through the Teacher Friday Workbox® that other teachers felt the same as them. And it was cathartic to visualize all they really did and it was no longer a mystery why they felt overwhelmed. Jayme encourages other schools to understand that each teacher will embrace it at their own level and that’s ok. At one point too, Jayme did the time circles with the teachers once again reinforcing that their time was spread pretty thin.  The First Workshop There I was with Jayme the principal, the assistant superintendent, and a room full of teachers. I couldn’t wait to hear all their feedback and realizations. But something interesting happened. I encouraged them to bring to light any issue within the building. This was another time they realized they weren’t alone in noticing the same issues. They were learning from each other. “Do the best you can until you know better. Then, when you know better, do better.” Maya Angelou. We discussed the different colored slash pockets and their use in the Teacher Friday Workbox®. The mental wellness of the staff providing for the students is so important. Now teachers had a designated place to place important documents.  Red for behavioral matters like IEP’s, 504’s, things with possible legal implications Orange for calendars and computers - maybe they wanted to print off something actionable from a parent Yellow out of the classroom; like field trips or projects for parents who help Green reimbursement but some use it for grading or lesson plans Blue teams; grade level, building level, parent, IEP, meetings (record questions for next meeting) Purple attendance Pink THE TEACHER! PD, peer reviews, or maybe just happy mail to remind you that you are a good teacher and the kids love you. Jayme noticed two awesome unexpected side effects. The teachers were now task stacking due to accomplishing tasks of the same color. And there was a trickle down of sorts where teachers could offer similar solutions to students to tackle their assignments.  I Almost Turned Around As I drove away recounting the workshop, all I could think of was the Special Education Team. They had no checklists and they were all new. They were new to the building, and most of them new to the Special Education Department. I knew they were going to need more support, so I arranged more time for the Special Education teachers. I do all of this in the name of teacher wellness, communication, and teacher retention! EPISODE RESOURCES: Teacher Friday Workbox® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
“What do you wanna get mom?” Is this the question you are asking your siblings? Are you starting to plan to get something for your mom for Mother’s Day? You know I’m all about planning and I have a great idea that could be the perfect solution to your gift dilemma.  You’ll buy the $20 item…but will you gift yourself organization?  We moms are where the holidays come from, right? And while you are shopping for your mom (if you are lucky enough to still have your mom), you’ll probably pick up smaller priced items you want. I know this because I am a mom, too. But will you gift yourself organization? Probably not. We have discussed before that this is not a line item in the monthly budget. So now may be the perfect time to put a Sunday Basket® or The Productive Home Solution® on your wish list and start dropping hints. While you love the flowers, now may be the time to say “enough with the flowers, will you please put that money towards organization?” Organization leads to confidence. Confidence leads to believing in opportunity. You’ll have time to explore those opportunities when you become productive as a result of getting organized. Could there be a better gift? I mean actually? Mental sanity - I think most moms long for mental sanity.  And maybe you get it for your mom. There is no age where you are too old to start organizing. And really, it’s kind of a gift for you too. You know as well as I do, that at the end of the day you can gift her organization now or do it yourself when you settle that estate. You two could be getting organized together.  How will you tell your child’s teacher “Thank You” this year?  It’s also the time of year when the class goes in on a gift for the teacher. It’s possible their teacher may not know what it is at first. But once they realize the gift they have received??? Let me just tell you, on the Wednesday podcast there are some episodes coming up where once teachers got their hands on the Teacher Friday Workbox®, they actually ended up using it as a Sunday Basket® for home. Teacher’s value organization. Help your teachers to free up mental chaos at home this summer. Free up their time this summer so they can focus on their families and aspirations, and then they can return to the classroom refreshed. Who knows they may even grab the Teacher Friday Workbox® to stay organized at work, too!  Did you know that office supplies are a teachers’ love language?  What is included in The Productive Home Solution®?   The Productive Home Solution® Playbook Online 52 Week Course with modules, worksheets, videos, and more Online Community via our private app The Productive Home Solution® Private Podcast EPISODE RESOURCES: Organize 365 Community App The Sunday Basket® The Productive Home Solution® The Teacher Friday Workbox® The Sunday Basket® Home Planning Day Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
Well, let’s dive into our 40’s. What I’ve observed in these decades as you move through your 20’s, 30’s and 40’s to 50’s is if you can imagine driving a stick shift car where it doesn’t automatically cycle to the next gear, and you’re driving in second gear and you need to shift into third gear but you don’t and the car is whining. That’s kind of how we are at the end of every decade - we’re whining. We’re not ready to leave this decade because we don’t know the next decade and it makes us a little nervous and apprehensive.  For decades, 40 was midlife. That’s no longer true. Until your 40’s, the answer to every organizational productivity problem was buy something, acquire something. Acquire the knowledge, the physical thing, the person. In your 40’s, everything is about letting go. Letting go of what is no longer serving you, letting go of future hopes and dreams that maybe have not materialized. This decluttering happens in every single area of your life in your 40’s. The process of making the decisions about what is staying and what is going is where the new capacity is unlocked. Organize 365® is set up to walk alongside you, provide community, co-working, and all of the lessons that you ended in order to get your home organized because once you do that all the way through, we’ve touched all the stuff and made decisions - it is so cathartic. So in your 40’s, your organization is a lot about your mindset and making your physical space match the next decades of your life and the person who you want to be.  What is our purpose in our 40’s? We are surviving - surviving in carpooling and driving, with limited time and financial resources. The purpose is to really move from just being an individual contributor to society, to figuring out what is your family, your ideals, your values. What is our capacity in our 40’s? This is a decade of constraint, capacity is limited and that is great because it requires you to push forward. If you have children, you become insular because you have to. They are humans that are growing so fast and they are depending on you. How do we use the physical spaces in our home in our 40’s? You will probably remodel some spaces, maybe more than once if you plan on living in your home long term. You’ll do bigger renovations in your 40’s than you did in your 30’s. What scaffolding or support do we need to make this phase of life easier and more productive? You need to learn the skill of organization. That’s where The Productive Home Solution®, The Paper Solution®, and The Sunday Basket® come in. Those products were designed to teach you and walk beside you as you really embrace who you are and what you’re uniquely created to do, and how your house will be organized and function for you. The essential thing I want to add to this phase of life are the Planning Days. They are a key differentiator in your 40’s, because you are deciding, you are making decisions and there really is no one guiding your thought process through making these decisions. What  do  you  want  to  see  manifest  in  the  next  four  months  in  your  household?  How are you going to do that? Let's look at all the constraints on your time, on your money, on your business, let's look at the role that you're playing, how many people are in your family. Let's look at all your household responsibilities and your chores. What's your plan going to be for laundry and dishes and meal planning and cleaning?  There’s so much time on the other side of 40. If you can use the time in your 40’s to get yourself organized, then when you do have the time in your 50’s it’s amazing. Can’t wait to tell you about it next time.  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Sunday Basket® The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® The Sunday Basket Home Planning Day Home Planning Day Prep Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
By now I’m guessing most of you have heard the evolution of the Sunday Basket®. The Sunday Basket® organizes the invisible tasks of home life, right? And with a teaching background, I also know there is a lot of burnout. The Teacher Friday Workbox® is designed to organize the invisible tasks of teaching. So what if, just what if, an entire school would launch a pilot with Organize 365® and they could feel supported and organized? Jayme was the principal who raised her hand and said I want to try this with my building for my teachers.  A Spark of a Conversation Normally on the 4th of July people are spending time with their families and celebrating the holiday, right? Not go getters like Jayme and I; we were chatting about the opportunity of a Teacher Friday Workbox® pilot.  Much to my surprise when I proposed a call, Jayme agreed. Our excitement for this pilot was ignited and put into action immediately. Jayme showed up in her minivan and we loaded it with workboxes for her building. She had 13 teachers come immediately to pick them up. There were teachers who knew what Jayme had been doing with her Teacher Friday Workbox® so they knew it worked and wanted to get started. More grabbed their workboxes after a meeting, and then more after the first training.  Too Much New to NOT Do The Pilot Jayme was explaining to me some of the things she was expecting about the new school year which included new teachers (most of whom were new to special education), a new assistant principal, and more responsibility for her needing to be involved in student behavioral correction. I chuckled and knew with all that change and newness, the Teacher Friday Workbox® was going to save her 2023-2024 school year. Are Your Teachers Ducks?  Have you heard the analogy of ducks looking calm on top of the water, but paddling like crazy under? Think of your teachers. Most are doing the same and that’s what leads to burnout. They don’t want you to see they are paddling so fast under water. The real trouble is when you see it - they are headed for burnout for sure. These are teachers who do not have an organizational solution in place. It would be ideal that the teacher understood the Sunday Basket® before embarking on the Teacher Friday Workbox®. But this time, we had to light the fuse due to the time of year. We initially found some of the teachers were overwhelmed with being new to the Organize 365® ecosystem, making visible the administrative tasks of a teacher on index cards (or some did a hybrid with sticky notes), and learning how to color code their work. When you clean up their mental chaos - you get teachers that will stay in their positions longer.  We Owe It To Our Teachers I understand that the pressing question with all expenditures within the education budget boils down to “How does this affect the student?” Let me just say, a teacher with less anxiety, more mental bandwidth, and one that feels supported is best for the students! There is a school supply list for students; this should be on the school supply list for teachers. But there is no line item for organization, honestly, at home or in the workplace. I want to see all educators free up time and mental space for employment retention and a happy home life. EPISODE RESOURCES: The Sunday Basket® Teacher Friday Workbox® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
You are all adults! Why am I trying to force a square peg into a round hole? There are people writing in saying “I am organized and I’d like to have a planning resource.” So here it is, all by its lonesome. I am breaking up The Productive Home Solution® for you more organized people. My school of thought was I originally wanted you to have all the “school supplies” to set you up for success. I realize you are adults and may want to have access to a planning resource without the resources to learn organization because you have already mastered it. Organize 365® continues to revamp and change. As a teacher, I am a lifelong learner and plan to reiterate as many times as needed to provide the best solutions for you! Planning Takes Back Your Mental Life Planning Day is open to everyone!  I’ve learned that planning is a higher level of executive function. It’s like building blocks and you can’t effectively plan until you have the basics down. Once you have the executive functions in place to organize, you can move on to planning. Planning makes room for productivity. Look at any productive person, that person that seems to have more hours in their day. At some point they have planned their time to have the outcome of so much productivity. There are plenty of decluttering challenges and productivity solutions, but Planning Day offers the actual skill of organizing life for productivity.  Planning Day Is Open To Everyone! I want you to start planning for longer chunks of time. I will show you how to plan further out than just tomorrow or this week. In Planning Day, we are going to think about summer - May, June, July, and August! In summer, we eat differently, play differently, work differently, and it feels good to have a plan in place for those different habits. In your Planning Day workbook, we are going to look at your current habits. But I will challenge you to think about changes you want to make. Maybe since the kids will be home for summer, you’ll want to workout before they get up - but you aren’t currently doing that. Also, you may discover you want to implement a new behavior. Do you know 45% of our life is habitual? I will help you decide what 1 or 2 new habits you want to focus on. Small changes over the course of time prevent overwhelm and result in productivity.  While you are registering for Planning Day, check out all the bundles and incentives we are currently offering. EPISODE RESOURCES: Your Year of Transformation Bundle (with kids) Your Year of Transformation Bundle (without kids) Complete Home Organization Bundle Home Planning Day Supplies Bundle - Deluxe Home Planning Day Supplies Bundle - Essentials CustomerService@organize365.com Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media
Welcome to our next installment of our phases of organization, our phases of life. So here we are, in our 30’s. We’re going to assume from this point forward that you are living independently and separate from your family home. I coined my own phase of life years ago (thanks Rhonda for the reminder!) for adulthood - accumulation. When you leave your childhood bedroom and you are living on your own, you realize you don’t own anything. Every time you decide you want to do something in your 20’s and 30’s, you end up going to a hardware store.  As you progress through your 30’s, the amount of discretionary income you have goes to negative. You usually don’t have any discretionary income by the time you are at the end of your 30’s. Same thing with your time - it goes to negative. How do we go from having some discretionary income and time to lacking both by the time you turn 40? In addition to accumulating supplies like a ladder, hammer, nails, etc., you accumulate other things. Also during your 30’s, you accumulate other people;a significant other, children, or pets. But this is why it’s hard having developmental stages for adults - because not everyone ends up with a significant other, kids or pets. There are so many different variables, different possibilities. You get to choose. You get to decide what your life is going to be like.  What is our purpose or job in our 30’s? Our purpose is to fully embrace independence from our family of origin. You are going to firmly establish your household and take on the responsibilities of that fully. What is our capacity? In the beginning you’ve got some time and money, but by the end it’s very constrained and maxed out. You’re trying to find a release valve, so to speak. How do we use the physical space in our home in our 30’s? This is when your home will do the most constant reordering. Your kitchen, kid’s rooms (if you have kids), and living spaces will constantly be updated to fit how you’re living life in your 30’s. What scaffolding or support do we need to make this phase of life easier and more productive? Number one you know will be the Sunday Basket®. You need household administration support - this will be your time to have a CEO meeting with yourself. The Productive Home Solution® is perfectly designed for people in their 30’s. The 2 binders from The Paper Solution® that are the most important in your 30’s are the Household Operations and Household Reference.  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Sunday Basket® The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
Now that you know a little bit about Jayme and her background in educational instruction, let’s move on to the responsibilities she’s had in different roles. Jayme has gone from assistant principal, where she barely left the building, to being the principal, where she was off campus frequently for personal development. But she has yet to be the superintendent!  Assistant Principal First thing Jayme pointed out that was so interesting is, in different states, different geographical sections of school are called corporations or districts. And because we have previously learned that Jayme was a counselor, she added that not all schools have counselors. Did you know that it is common for each counselor to have 250-300 students assigned to them? I know Abby and Joey really valued counselors in their schools. It’s her previous title as counselor that makes it a natural strength as the assistant principal to be the liaison between the parents and staff. As assistant principal, Jayme was used to doing whatever her principal needed as well as overseeing special education needs within the school, IEP’s, RIT, attendance, behavior and other miscellaneous responsibilities.  Principal Jayme never had to worry about a budget as an assistant principal. Once she stepped into the role of principal, she found the magical money tree…not so magical now that she was in charge of it! She also found herself out of the building frequently for personal development. Thankfully her superintendent is great at communicating educational opportunities for her. Jayme is also the initiator of activities and signs off on them. One of the things that really impressed me upon a visit to her school during the pilot was Movie Day. This is the day before school breaks for Christmas. Jayme and I really talked in detail about the actual details of the day. I was so impressed with her organization and the fact that the students expect and understand the system of that day! If you want to sit with your friend who chose to drink Sprite then you better put a request in for Sprite too! A great takeaway from this conversation is that planning leads to expectation. Expectations are kind of like structure in this situation and that makes people feel safe knowing the next thing that will happen. And because of this organization and planning, her parents trust her to organize annual trips to DC and NYC. Superintendent This is the top dog, if you will, the CEO! We talk about invisible work. When you do it no one really notices until you don’t! And the public facing role of superintendent is very much like this. No one notices until they don’t attend an event. This person also faces the budget that Jayme has become familiar with multiplied by the number of schools they’re in charge of. When Jayme’s school had a massive renovation, it wasn’t the groundskeeper that was reporting to the educational community what the progress and funding was, it was the superintendent! Sure, there are people supporting him in large projects, but ultimately he reports the good and the bad. When a superintendent makes a decision, there are multiple factors they are considering not just the population from one building. This is a very public, almost political, position due to reporting to the faculty, public, board, even the state!.  Enough background information… Next episode, we’re going to share how this whole pilot got started with a bang over the 4th of July weekend! EPISODE RESOURCES: Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
It is astounding to me that we live in dwellings all over the world and we don’t have much at all (and nothing new) to explain the development of adults and the elderly. Surely this exists and I can’t find it yet?!? First, I’m going to explain what I have been able to find, and then I’m going to ask the same questions I did with the other phases of life.  The parabolas I came up with represent money and time. Then there’s the middle, straight line - it’s housework. It’s never accounted for in any of these studies as life-long unpaid work. There are 3 types: cleaning, tasks of daily living, and life administration. What is our purpose in this phase? Do housework! This is our job at home. What is our capacity? It’s three-fold: how much time you have, how much money you have, and the third that is unique to you - your energy. Are you optimally energized for the role that you are in? How do you use the physical spaces in your home during this phase? Houses haven’t changed much since the 50’s. But I can change your mindset about how to use your house. What scaffolding or support do we need? There have been no organizational supports or structures put into place for the administration of households. You need a Sunday Basket®, you need binders to replace your file cabinet, and you need The Productive Home Solution® in order to learn how to organize and optimize every part of your house. Different phases of life require different organizational structures and systems. EPISODE RESOURCES: Parabolas Illustration The Sunday Basket® The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
Jayme was a self proclaimed organized hoarder. She’s always been a naturally organized person. In 2017, she hit rock bottom knowing she just had too much. It wasn’t until the windows were replaced in her house. You see when you have new windows installed, you have to move everything away from the windows so the installers have enough room. For about two weeks, all that stuff was in the middle of her room. THAT was chaos, but it shined a light on the fact that all the mess or hoarding at home was causing Jayme mental chaos. This is when Jayme found Organize 365® and cleaned up her personal space, her home. Cleaning Up Mental Chaos at Work Jayme was used to pouring herself into work as a principal Monday through Friday and cleaned house on Saturdays. Jayme would stay as late as she needed to on Friday nights just to have peace of mind that she was prepared to walk back into school on Monday. If we are honest with ourselves, as educators, the one planning period you get is not ample planning time. When you plan as a teacher, you are able to deal with any distractions during instructional time. Jayme found the Education Friday Workbox® (now the Teacher Friday Workbox®) and was able to get organized at work. The Friday Workbox® allows her to plan and feel prepared, and that’s what she wants for her staff. She wants them to continue having a passion for teaching and not feeling burnt out. Cleaning Up Mental Chaos at Home This cleaning up of mental chaos is why Jayme was so excited to share the Education Friday Workbox® with her teachers. If she could just show them how to get organized in the classroom, they would see the benefit of having home organized, too. At Organize 365®, we want to bring light to the invisible work you are doing and have a better plan to tackle it. It took Jayme about 18 months to get her home “done” and longer for work. Jayme encourages her staff to know it will take time. A first grader can’t read a book and write a full report, but after a few years of learning and doing, in 3rd grade maybe they can. And I never mix words about this, it will take time. Jayme finds herself still listening to the older podcasts and learning. She recognizes that the information lands differently now when she hears it based on her progress. She still hears new things she can add to what she’s already used to doing. You have learned a lot about Jayme and next Jayme is going to help us understand the structure of schools and responsibilities of staff in the state of Indiana, specifically Greendale Middle School in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. EPISODE RESOURCES: Teacher Friday Workbox® On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
This is the next installment of the phases of life series. We’re now in the phase of development called Emerging Adulthood. In my PhD studies, I’m trying to figure out the role that the developmental phases of life play in how we learn and do housework over the life cycle. I’ve always been interested in human growth and development. After 18, the amount of literature and research drops off quickly. The key distinguisher of this phase of life versus others is this feeling of being “in between.” Things happen legally at certain ages (18, 21), but other things are assumed to be inherently known or done. This isn’t a US thing, it is a developed country thing. In Asia, until you are married your parents take care of you. In Italy, you live at home with no obligation that you would do the housework until you’re about 30. People are living at home longer now, and not owning homes until they are older.  I remember being in my 20’s. I went to a 4-year college, got married a year after graduation, and adopted my babies in my late 20’s. So I was a stay-at-home-mom (SAHM) with 2 kids by the time I was 30. I tell my kids that your 20’s are for trying things. Different jobs, schools, food, places to live - get experience so you know what you want to do by the time you’re in your 30’s. What does it mean to adult? By the time we are 30, we should be responsible for our finances, housework, where we are living, the job we want, and relationships. Finding friends in your 20’s is hard!  What is our capacity? Time and money wise - the amounts kind of melt together. You start having to pay for the “not fun” things in life - insurance, rent, utilities, etc. Things you never realize are part of adulthood. Then there’s how we use the physical spaces in our home during this phase. Most of the spaces will be smaller, but will still have zones. Our mini apartment (bedroom), a dorm room, an apartment or condo. I’m already extending my parenting horizon to 25, mostly because I have children with ADHD. It’s difficult for these new adults in this phase, but it’s hard for us parents too. We’re not done. Not that we are ever truly done - but the active parenting to a certain degree is done.  As your 20 year olds start to take on more responsibilities of adulthood, there are some that are more easily acquired and there are some that take longer and have more limitations. As the parents of adults, I am paying for and providing these things for our children, but I’m looking at it as we are property owners. Will this work all the way until they are 30? Then I’m doing it.  Organize 365® has the Launch Program for 16-25 year olds. Inside of Launch, there are lessons for turning your bedroom into a mini apartment and understanding the zones, a starter Sunday Basket®, and a binder with parts of the Medical, Financial, and Household Reference Binders for renters. Clothing, food, and entertainment are the biggest areas where you will fully embrace adulting.  What scaffolding or support do we need? Understanding. This is a phase, there are pluses and minuses. It can be challenging. Having a way to communicate what true adult responsibilities are and what that looks like when you are successful is difficult. It’s much better when the person in their 20’s can figure out what they want to know and then ask the parents. This is the phase of life when you realize the fact that you have to clean your bedroom for the rest of your life!   EPISODE RESOURCES: Parabolas Illustration Launch Program Kids Program ADHD Bundle The Sunday Basket® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
I hope you all remember Jayme from the Teacher Pilot that I shared with you in previous episodes. Jayme found the Organize 365® systems effective for home and then implemented them at work. Jayme was open to the idea of using her school as a pilot to see how the Teacher Workbox® could impact an entire building. In this series, we’ll discuss everything from the idea to implementation and to the feedback.  Meet Jayme: Principal at Greendale Middle School in Lawrenceburg, Indiana First off, I want you to know exactly who Jayme is and her background. The funniest request we have received is that people want to know Jayme’s thoughts. Never mind that I too was a teacher and founded this organizational system. Just kidding! But I was surprised by it nonetheless. Jayme shared that she always knew she wanted to be a teacher. She remembers playing school even as a child. As I learned more about Jayme, I was surprised how much we had in common when it came to our childhood aspirations. It was also reinforced through this episode that teachers are cut from the same cloth; that of passion for teaching and hearts of service. School came pretty easy to Jayme with a floating B. She loved math, history, science, and to read. But to spell? That is a different story to this day! Before she even completed college, she was happy to keep her Fridays open so she could sub. She knew there would always be work on Fridays. Soon she met her husband Joe and decided to move to Indiana with Joe so they could live happily ever after together.  “I’m not a workaholic, I’m passionate about teaching.”  Jayme completed her degree in 1998 in elementary education and middle school certifications for social studies and science. She graduated to teach elementary, but ended up in middle school. She worked in the classroom for about 7 years until she got the desire to counsel the students. She went for her Masters for counseling and finished while she was pregnant with her first child, Pierce. Most of her experience has been with middle grades 6-8 in science and as a guidance counselor. Starting in 2000, Jayme was a school counselor for 4-½ years. This is when she decided she needed another Masters for being a Principal and added another child to her life, Kennedy. Jayme shared she has always had a long commute, but appreciates the time to digest what is currently going on in life and work. With all this driving, education advancement,  and growing - you could easily call her a workaholic but she prefers to identify it as her passion. But where does that passion go for some educators? We want to help educators retain that passion and put systems in place to prevent burnout. When the Principal Gets Organized Now that she had her Admin Masters, Jayme could be an assistant principal which allowed her to help students and teachers alike. In 2013, she became an assistant principal only to take over being a principal 1-1/2 years later when her friend and boss had to step down. Jayme thought, “I’m basically already doing her job because she had to miss a lot of work.” Jayme’s eyes were opened as to all the actual responsibilities once she was doing the role of principal for real. Jayme likes to delegate tasks with her assistant principal based on strengths.  Jayme was all too excited to share with her staff what had been working to keep her organized and kept burnout at bay. I can’t wait to share with you how this pilot played out!! On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
The first in this series of podcasts is the childhood phase (0-18 years). We are going to walk through the entire life cycle of a human and look at a few specific questions. 1. What is our purpose during this phase of life? 2. What is our capacity, time and money wise? 3. How are we using the physical spaces in our home during this time? 4. What scaffolding or support do we need to make this phase of life easier and more productive?  What is the purpose or job of a child inside the household? There are two - the first is to develop and grow from a child to an adult, and the second is to learn and attend school. That’s it. Some children will be able to add on a third, which is to be a productive, proactive person in the household by doing chores and helping. But some children will not and I think we need to normalize this. Because I always knew that developing from a child to an adult and attending school were the top two jobs of this phase of life, I didn’t add on the third category of household chores for my kids. I did add on bedroom chores, but not household chores.  What is the capacity of the child from zero to 18 inside of the house? Birth is when you have a lot more time than you do money. As a child moves from zero to 18, the amount of time and care they need will reduce and the amount of money they are able to generate will start to increase by the time they are 18. It’s a huge two decade phase of life. Children in this phase go from being a baby that can’t even hold a bottle to someone that can drive a car, has a job, goes out and gets their own food or makes their own dinner. The amount of physical, mental, emotional, social change that happens in childhood is huge.  How do children use the physical spaces in our homes? Their stuff is everywhere. The amount of stuff doesn’t change, but the types of things do. They’re mostly in our communal spaces; the kitchen, family room, main bathroom, and laundry room if they’re old enough. They’re in their bedrooms or playrooms, sometimes in the basement or bonus rooms. As they get older, they start to get rid of more toys and be in their bedrooms most of the time. Then they can create zones - bookshelves, cube systems, a desk for schoolwork, etc.  What scaffolding or support do we need to make this phase of life easier and more productive? Kids need to learn how to clear their mind and organize their bedroom, and they need to learn how to plan for the week ahead and be productive. Here’s how I teach that in Organize 365®. First, there are lessons for parents on how to teach the skill of organizing to your kids. How to organize everything related to babies, clothing, and everything else. Then kids ages 6-15 go though the course to learn about their mini apartments and all the zones they have. You have to organize a bedroom before you can clean it. I teach them what are zones in your bedroom and how to understand there are different areas of your bedroom that have different responsibilities. Lessons on clothing, sharing bedrooms, schoolwork, creating activity bags, organizing passion projects, and school memories or paperwork. Then you have a child’s backpack. Their backpacks are the equivalent to our Sunday Basket®. They go through their backpacks, make sure they have everything they need for Monday, pack their activity bags, and then write down their week on paper. In the Kids Program there is a sheet where they can fill out all their activities and events in the Before School, School Day, After School, and Evening categories.  Next week we are going to talk about emerging adulthood, which is 18-29.  EPISODE RESOURCES: Parabolas Illustration Kids Program Lisa School Binder School Memory Binder Launch Program Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
In this new podcast series I’m going to talk about organization in each phase of life, but first I want to talk about phases of life. There is childhood (0-18), a new theory called emerging adulthood (18-29), middle adulthood and late adulthood. There is so much to these phases of life and layered on top of these is the capacity and the time limitation of variables as it relates to that phase of life. I picture this like two arches that mirror each other and intersect at two points. We all know that childhood is pretty well established and studied. Then there’s the new theory called emerging adulthood where you’re in between childhood and full adulthood. Then there’s the years around 70-82 where I made up this idea of “reverse emerging adulthood” because you have all this experience, but you’re at an in-between stage again where you are no longer an active contributing member of society.  The time and capacity continuum is frustrating for me because when I have time, I didn’t have the knowledge and capacity to act on it. And then when I don’t have the time, I have all the knowledge. A great example of this is menopause. The average age of menopause is 50 years old and that hasn’t changed in the last 2,000 years. However, the age that puberty happens has changed. So the mid-life “dip” most people experience corresponds with menopause. Ironically, when a person is in the generative phase of life and pauses to focus on their needs and desires, usually between 45 and 55, society labels this as a midlife crisis. However, it isn’t a crisis at all. It’s a natural rebalancing of energy and production in the middle of a long adult life cycle.  If I have to find academic support for everything I do or want to do in the future, it’s going to take forever for us to really understand how households function throughout a lifespan, let alone how to organize them. So that’s why I wanted to first have this conversation about how I view a lifespan. I view it as inverse arches of time and capacity, and the golden windows where they cross over.  In this next series, what can you expect? I’m looking to unpack what our purpose is, what our capacity is, how we use physical space in our homes during certain phases of life, and what support we need to make this phase of life easier or less invisible. Basically I’m trying to figure out, what is the phase of life map of household organization? So if you were to map out household organization across the whole life phase, what would that look like?  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Sunday Basket® Jump Start - Personal Jump Start - Kitchen The Kitchen Productivity & Profitability Blitz Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
I have these big ideas, big questions, big observations that I think about when I’m driving, going to bed, in the shower…how different related concepts are viewed in different environments and how they actually are all talking about the same thing; we’re just using different words to describe them. So in this episode and the next, I want you to give me a little bit of latitude to verbally process with you where I am thinking we are in our understanding of how we’re functioning inside of our families, especially as the head of household and the administration of what’s going on at home. In this episode I want to really talk about the weight of the mental load inside households. I’m going to hit this from a couple different angles. I’m going to talk about what I’ve been learning about in my PhD, different things I’ve been reading, different things I’ve observed. I’m going to start by talking about cognitive load.  In cognitive psychology, cognitive load refers to the amount of working memory resources used. Heavy cognitive load can have negative effects on task completion, and it is important to note that the experience of cognitive load is not the same in everyone. There is not a lot of literature I have found related to how all of these cognitive processes that we talk about in school or work affect us at home (please send me any links you have!). Working memory remembers tasks, processes information, creates a plan, and makes decisions. We do that at home from the time we open our eyes in the morning until the time we close them for a nap or to go to bed. Even when we go to bed, we’re still trying to remember things, process information, make a plan and make decisions for the next day.  The cognitive load at home is discussed in academia in relation to housework, especially the fact that women are doing more. It doesn’t matter what gender or ethnicity you look at, women are definitely doing more. When I think about our role at home as household managers and the cognitive role at home, there’s no end to our day. There’s no quitting time. There’s no ending time. Then you layer on top of that the fact there are just a bazillion trillion, little teeny tiny tasks that you have to do at home. And here’s the thing: they are all INVISIBLE. I think the fact that the work is invisible adds to the cognitive load in a couple of ways. One, because we gaslight ourselves into thinking maybe we’re not doing as much as we’re actually doing because we can’t see what we actually did. And two is that you know no one else can really see what we’re doing and therefore we don’t get the “atta boys” and gold stars and “thank you very much” that you would normally get if you were in corporate America or in school.  I’m starting to double down on the fact that the uniqueness of the Sunday Basket® and why I think it works so well is the fact that you write things down on paper. I designed it to literally work for any kind of learner. My hypothesis is that it is the recorded thought on paper that is the science part. It gets the thought out of your head - it moves it from working memory and externalizes it. Also the fact that it is written by your hand is key - when you write by hand, the information gets encoded deeper into your brain. So is it the fact that you write that note on paper versus typing it into a phone helping you to retrieve a memory? I am retrieving a memory and writing it down, the physical act of writing is encoding it deeper into my memory. It pulls it out of my working memory onto the paper and then allows it to leave my working memory so now that is clear and ready for whatever I want to think about next. That idea or thing I needed to remember then becomes triage for later urgency, I no longer have to think or remember whatever that was. So then, does this repeated interaction with this task that needs to be done deepen the memory trace of this experience and the recall?  Welcome to the Sunday Basket® - the physical representation of over 10,000 women’s cognitive loads! The actual physical weight of the cognitive load of household management. For funsies, those of you who have a Sunday Basket® - I would love for you to go and weigh your Sunday Basket®. You are holding a very heavy cognitive load comprised of your finances, meal planning, bills that need to be paid, the mail, cleaning schedule, projects that are in process, requests of your time, so many little pieces of information that are literally weighing you down.  I’m here to say, “atta boy”, you’re doing a great job. Here’s your gold star. Thank you so much. Thank you for taking care of your family and your community and your household. Thank you for being financially responsible and cleaning up your messes and making your bed and doing your laundry. The invisible work that you’re doing IS HAPPENING. Hopefully somehow through collaboration, we will be able to scientifically support what is actually happening cognitively for the homeowner in all of the roles and responsibilities that they are doing that are invisible to themselves and those they live with, making it visible so we can have a conversation, so we can eliminate as much as possible so you can do what you were uniquely created to do with your time, which is not more dishes and laundry.  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Kitchen Productivity & Profitability Blitz Jump Start - Personal Jump Start - Kitchen The Sunday Basket® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
This week I want to talk about lists. Why I don’t have to do lists, cleaning lists, work lists, etc. I just all the sudden realized I didn’t have them and had to figure out, where did they go? When did I get rid of them? How long have I been living without lists? Where was my security blanket? It just seems like the more productive you are, don’t you need more lists? Shouldn’t your lists have lists?  So my new to-do list is my Sunday Basket®. Many of the things that our brain reminds us to do or that end up in our Sunday Basket® don't need to be done now, or in the near future, or in some cases, ever. But our brain wants to let us know about it as a possibility… of a potential way of spending our time if we'd like to sometime in the future, maybe. What I’ve moved into after so many years of checklists is establishing better routines, better cadences of natural structures inside my house, inside my day, inside my work. Looking at my morning, afternoon and evening routines. There are six routines that I have Monday through Friday, and then my household management and household cleaning day. There are no organizing emergencies.  Having good, strong routines for the essentials and then wide open spaces for whatever you WANT to do. Let’s play more! Are your lists really serving you anymore? Are they helping you? Are they reducing your stress and anxiety or making it worse? For me, the answer has been the Sunday Basket® at home, the Friday Workbox® at work, planning days every 3 or 4 months for home and work, and the Organize 365® Blitzes.  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Kitchen Productivity & Profitability Blitz The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® Jump Start - Personal Jump Start - Kitchen The Sunday Basket® The Friday Workbox® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
My fellow Americans…I bring you this state of the family economy due to what my household is experiencing and the relief I want to offer you! Have you also noticed the increased prices of the following? I asked the Organize 365® community and this is what you all said: •Groceries •Home Owners (especially in southern and coastal towns) •Electricity •Property Taxes •Rent •Healthcare •Tipping •Streaming Services/Entertainment •Service Providers Wait, I’ve been here before… In December I realized the hustle was back and I started to feel like something else was “brewing” but hadn’t quite put my finger on it. Towards the end of January when I didn’t see financial relief at the end of the tunnel, I knew what it was. We are all feeling inflation, and quite honestly, “shrinkflation.” I have experienced this 4 times in the past. •2004-2005 - I remember those 110 doctor appointments, which I have approximated at 3 hours each. The bills that were racked up due to those doctor visits. And all of the invisible work I put into my family as a result of those doctor appointments, from caring for my children to science experiments called dinner.  •2008-2009 - My father was in poor health, and when he passed away, it was my sister and I who were left to take care of his affairs since my parents had divorced a few years prior. I was the executor and on top of kids medical needs, the direct sales company I worked under filing bankruptcy, a recession, and just life! There was a lot of invisible work being accomplished by me of which no one else was aware.  • 2011-2012 - The year I decided that if it was to be, it was up to me! I started Organize 365® in an effort to get my life under control and help others to do the same. I just love the American spirit, immigrant risk takers with passion, and how we can all pursue what we want in the way we want to because you all know traditional is not what you would call my business sense.  • 2020…Need I say more? This was a time of immense fear and uncertainty. We were home so we organized. Now that we are not home as much, it’s even more important that we stop, plan, implement. Stop doing 800 thousand million trillion things. Get off the treadmill to nowhere.  Your home is THE business that powers the American economy!  The pandemic pointed out how important small businesses are and today the American home as a business is flexing its muscle. We power America from 123 Main St. And we are really feeling it in the grocery stores. I noticed the ways I have solved this issue in the past are not effective this time around due to my family needs. I stopped (how did I solve this in the past?), planned (took a look at my family and our needs), and now I want to implement it with the Organize 365® community.  Kitchen Productivity & Profitability Blitz - March 4-8th -Family surveys (the all skate) -Get clear on breakfast preferences, snacks, and the restaurants you operate daily -Stop wasting money at the grocery store - make your business (your home) profitable and productive Bonus: Great conversations, including how to get 5 “wins,” sparked from the comments after this Instagram Live. EPISODE RESOURCES: Kitchen Productivity & Profitability Blitz CustomerService@organize365.com Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media
Last week I talked about Saturday time versus Sunday time, having housework time versus having household management time. Here’s another layer: big projects, small projects, big tasks and small tasks. When I’m stressed, I tend to check off as many small tasks as possible - things that don’t require a lot of mental bandwidth. It’s basically decluttering, and that energy makes you feel lighter so you can move into organizing. Then there’s big project energy. You can feel the difference between these. The problem is when you have a whole bunch of little tasks to do, but you have big project energy…or you have a big project energy, but not a big chunk of time.  For organizing, sometimes you will want quick wins and you’re organizing with little 15 minute tasks. Sometimes you will want really big two or three hour sessions, or maybe something that takes the entire weekend. When you’re first learning to organize the Organize 365® way, there are two schools of thought. You do short, 15-minute activities…or you empty out the entire closet and get it all organized in one day. As you move along, these 15-minute quick wins that you learn to do just get expanded into longer and longer organizing sessions.  It’s all about the kind of energy you have for organizing, what kind of energy you have for projects. That is going to wax and wane throughout the weeks, months, and years. This ties back into Golden Windows. Golden Windows are seasons where the organizing energy is high for everyone. The organizing energy for February is finances. Organizing your finances, crafts, or photos. That is what most people will naturally organize this time of year.  Your job right now is to keep going. 15 minutes a day. Just do a 15-minute organizing activity a day while your energy is low and then you just wait. It’s going to happen. Be ready to either task stack a whole bunch of 15-minute sessions in a row, or tackle something really big that you’ve been putting off that you didn’t know when you were going to do it. The more you understand how time is used at home and for what purpose time is used at home, the better you will be able to do it. Saturday time is not the same as Sunday time. Small task energy is not the same as big project energy.  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® Jump Start - Personal Jump Start - Kitchen The Sunday Basket® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
Today starts another three part series, and in this series we’re going to be talking about time, tasks, task stacking, and how to really think about our time at home differently. Today’s episode is about the difference between Saturday time and Sunday time. I’m going to take us all back to our childhood, because I think in childhood we understood the difference between Saturday and Sunday time. So on Saturdays, you cleaned your room (even if that meant just being able to see the floor and the laundry was put away) and then you went out to play. On Sundays, you cleaned out your backpack and got ready for the next school week - check all your folders, finish your homework, give all papers to your parents that they need to see, and so on.  As adults, your bedroom turns into the entire house. Saturday becomes your housework day. Saturday work is very visible. Vacuum, clean the house, do the laundry and dishes, grocery shop, clean out the refrigerator…the list never ends. Sunday is for household management. Sunday work is invisible. This is where you go through your Sunday Basket® - open your mail, pay your bills, plan your schedule for the week, decide when you’ll run errands…you get the idea. Both days are important, but both days are different in the amount of visibility other people have about whether or not you have done your work. They have completely different energies to them. My goal is to always make visible the invisible work you’re doing so that we can do LESS OF IT. I want you to stop always working. There’s always, always going to be more to do. When are you able to say it’s done?  When you become disciplined at having bigger time blocks for even your housework, you will find those little pockets of time where you could go for a walk, take a longer shower, find a way to start using those for yourself and your wellness - not to get one more thing checked off a list. Challenge yourself to do a time study and try to see if you can get your housework and your household management done in less time next weekend and instead give yourself some free time. Start to prioritize when your free time is going to be and what it will be used for. Start looking at your time like little buckets or Lego bricks, how can you manipulate them based on your energy?  EPISODE RESOURCES: The Paper Solution® The Productive Home Solution® Jump Start - Personal Jump Start - Kitchen The Sunday Basket® Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
First of all…don’t panic! It’s just a small, 6-week break. You know, every once in a while you need to get reorganized and pause something so you have more bandwidth to address another project. That’s all we’re doing! In the meantime, I’d love to record an episode with you about your transformation with Organize 365®! Just go to the website >Podcast >Wednesday Podcast >Apply to be our guest…it’s that simple! But when I come back, the episodes will be a mini series with Jayme from Greendale Middle School who participated in the teacher pilot. This way when new educational faculty want to learn more about the program, they can listen to this mini series instead of having to sift through 9 years of episodes.  Adult Circle Time Second of all, have I got something big for you! I’ve been mulling over this idea that as adults we need circle time. You know, think about the weather, what’s for lunch, and activities we have coming up…but for adults. I still have that kindergarten teacher brain. And I really think as adults we could all benefit from a little heads up as to the organizing energy of the week/month, golden windows that are coming up so we can be prepared to get a specific project accomplished, plan for holidays so they don’t just pop up on us, and offerings from us here at Organize 365®! I mean if you think about it, the schools do this for us, right? They let us know all the things that are coming up and then you as the parent plan ahead how you want to participate in each activity/event. Do you have time, money, and availability? Then you know what to expect. That’s all this is - a little circle time that will be every Thursday evening so you can make a proactive plan. I hope you’ll join me! It’ll be everywhere your eyeballs would be That’s right! At 7pm in all the places: your email inbox, the app, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Facebook! The video newsletter will be published and you will get adult circle time to make better informed decisions about your upcoming week! If you have unsubscribed from the newsletter - I hope you’ll reconsider because this will be the one and only communication to go out each week and it’ll be jam packed with helpful information!! There will be a printable PDF for you to get organized, plan, and be more productive. EPISODE RESOURCES: Wednesday Podcast Guest Sign Up for the Organize 365® Newsletter  On the Wednesday podcast, I get to talk with members of the Organize 365­® community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps and triumphs along their organizing journey. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share with me and with this community. You can see and hear transformation in action. If you are ready to share your story with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday. Did you enjoy this episode? Please leave a rating and review in your favorite podcast app. Share this episode with a friend and be sure to tag Organize 365® when you share on social media!
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Comments (13)

Jennifer L

You can purchase 3x5 index card stock for your printer then I'd say maybe make a QR code for the website or YouTube video with a note or title to differentiate what it is. It's multiple steps but maybe it could be something you do periodically. Not sure, just wanted to provide an idea.

Nov 20th
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Emily Murphy

YES!!! YES!!! YES!!!

Dec 29th
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Sharon

This is definitely one of my favorite Lisa podcasts to listen to in preparation for the fall (the most productive season of the year she says), and really for anytime I want some encouragement/mindset adjustment regarding routines, planning, goals . . . productivity!

Aug 5th
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Joy Lizbeth

ok I'll I'm mm hi j in an email to our home ere3in every morning👍😁👍😁

Jun 11th
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Wendy Wendt

Re Bonus Issue 10: Lisa!!! During this pandemic, people should NOT have the neighbor kids come over to babysit! NOT go over to the neighbors! NOT have neighbors over! That spreads disease whether you feel well or not. People can be carriers even if they feel well.

Mar 29th
Reply (1)

Naishe Kami

Bold of you to assume I have a laundry basket.

Mar 25th
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Emily Murphy

Instantpot is also a slow cooker.

Oct 2nd
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Natasha deVries

Organize 365 is my favourite podcast and I listen to several! Thank you for always inspiring me👌👌👌👌

Sep 27th
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Jana Miller

I have loved listening to your Podcast and am so excited to say that I ordered your book The Organization Mindset on Amazon and it will arrive tomorrow!

Jun 2nd
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Jennifer Dunn

Great episode! 100 days to build a habit is definitely more accurate than 21. I think research has found that it takes 6 weeks to develop a habit, but longer to keep it.

Mar 29th
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Mylinda

"pack it up we'll deal with it at home" Omgosh!! it's like you were there! thanks so much for this podcast, you made me feel so much better... I'm not alone!

Nov 6th
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Mylinda

AWESOME! YOU are the BEST!!!!

Oct 25th
Reply
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