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Today, we have a bonus episode where Emily answers your personal questions about her career and more. Thanks for sending in so many great questions on Instagram at @profemilyoster! Stay tuned for more.
We're making some short-term changes to the podcast — and big plans for the future!From now on, you can listen to the audio version of the newsletter in the  Substack app with their text-to-speech feature. Find instructions here.To get the newsletter in your inbox for free, subscribe at parentdata.org.
Gas Stoves and Asthma

Gas Stoves and Asthma

2023-01-1110:22

The panicked emails and DMs I got about gas stoves last week were perhaps best summarized by a message on Sunday. I had indicated I’d cover this this week, and the person simply asked, Can you tell us the bottom line RIGHT NOW, because I’m planning to buy a new stove today?
Today I am thrilled to feature an interview with two professional women runners, Lauren Fleshman and Molly Huddle. Lauren has a new book out tomorrow, which is the impetus for our interview, and we’ll also talk about Molly’s book from last spring. We talk about running, but I promise this is really a conversation about postpartum and post-puberty and finding a way to excel in male-dominated spaces and tons of other stuff. It’s a good listen even if you do not love to run. Enjoy!
Today we're diving in to sleep training details. Many people are sold on the idea of sleep training, but then there is the how? When do you start? Is there a better method?
Today, we have a bonus episode where Emily answers your personal questions about her marriage and more. Thanks for sending in so many great questions on Instagram! Stay tuned for a possible part two...
Breast Milk Storage

Breast Milk Storage

2022-12-1912:51

How long is too long? And what about refreezing?
Here is my dive into the question of when you should brush your teeth. This is admittedly a somewhat narrow question, but I am hoping to settle a family argument.
Several months ago, I wrote a post encouraging people to consider what “one thing” they’d like to change to make their daily life a little easier. You guys wrote in with absolutely amazing things — many, many more than we could follow up on. But we picked a few representative cases and did a deep dive into the problem and possible solutions. Today we’re talking about kids and eating.
Today I am absolutely delighted to feature an interview with two amazing authors.  Jessica Grose is the author of the just-released book Screaming on the Inside: The Unsustainability of American Motherhood, and Yael Schonbrun is a clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at Brown (my colleague!) and the author of the new book Work, Parent, Thrive.
Today's discussion: a lens into thinking more generally about where data comes from, and whether we can be confident in what it tells us.
This episode was inspired by a question I get frequently. It’s some version of “I’m pregnant and my doctor said it’s important to work out but that I shouldn’t get my heart rate above 140. Is this true?”  Let's look at the data!
Mastitis. If you’ve had it, the word itself prompts a reaction. When I mentioned the topic in our ParentData Slack channel, one team member commented, “Just the thought of this gives me a fever.” For me, the salient memory is adhering to the advice to feed the baby first from the affected breast. I love my son, but I did not love him at that moment. But let's dive in!
Pacifiers are a big deal but also a source of stress. This is true with infants, when people worry about risks (nipple confusion?) but also see possible benefits (SIDS prevention?). And it’s true later on, when parents become concerned about possible downsides to long-term use. Today I will dive deep, deep into the data.
For  charts of the survey data, please visit https://www.parentdata.org/p/how-long-does-it-take-to-get-pregnant
In this moment, I am still getting a lot of questions about illness and seeing family. I will note, however, they are mostly not about COVID. People — especially those with young kids — are more worried about flu and RSV. The pandemic isn’t over, but it’s reached a place for most people where COVID is part of a broader landscape of illness. The turducken we build this year for Thanksgiving is going to be one we consider keeping indefinitely; it’s one we could have had in earlier, pre-COVID years, except  we were not thinking about it.
One of my favorite things to do is peruse relevant journals and see what they are up to that I’m not hearing about in the New York Times or in the scary headlines you send me on Instagram DMs. Today I’m going to surface the results of one of those perusals. I spent a few hours in JAMA Pediatrics, a top pediatrics journal. Here’s some of the interesting stuff I found, plus a bit of speculation at the end about why they didn’t pop up in your news feed. Want more on pregnancy and parenting? Subscribe to the ParentData newsletter for free at ParentData.org. You can also become a paid subscriber for access to the full ParentData archive (searchable by topic) and an extra newsletter every week.
Several months ago, timed with the paperback publication of The Family Firm, I wrote a post encouraging people to consider what “one thing” they’d like to change to make their daily life a little easier. You guys wrote in with absolutely amazing things — many, many more than we could follow up on. But we picked a few representative cases and did a deep dive into the problem and possible solutions. It’s now been enough time for a trial. So — did these ideas work? How do they look when we follow up?  Want more on pregnancy and parenting? Subscribe to the ParentData newsletter for free at ParentData.org. You can also become a paid subscriber for access to the full ParentData archive (searchable by topic) and an extra newsletter every week.
Today I’m addressing two of the big panic buttons that have come across my desk recently. First, the paper on hair straighteners and uterine cancer. Second, the FDA removal of Makena, a drug to prevent preterm birth, from the market.  Want more on pregnancy and parenting? Subscribe to the ParentData newsletter for free at ParentData.org. You can also become a paid subscriber for access to the full ParentData archive (searchable by topic) and an extra newsletter every week.
A vasectomy is a low-risk procedure that provides excellent (permanent, though sometimes reversible) birth control. In an effort to help readers who've written it about it, and anyone else who is thinking this through, today is a vasectomy deep dive. Want more on pregnancy and parenting? Subscribe to the ParentData newsletter for free at ParentData.org. You can also become a paid subscriber for access to the full ParentData archive (searchable by topic) and an extra newsletter every week.
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