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Play Therapy Parenting Podcast
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Play Therapy Parenting Podcast

Author: Dr. Brenna Hicks

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The path to calm, confident, and in-control parenting starts now. The Play Therapy Parenting Podcast is hosted by Dr. Brenna Hicks, The Kid Counselor®. All content, no fluff.
136 Episodes
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In this episode, we explore the practical aspects of Reflecting Feelings, focusing on how this essential skill can be effectively used in daily interactions with children. Our goal is to demystify the process and encourage more confident and consistent application in your parenting. Key Points Covered: Understanding Reflecting Feelings: An overview of why this skill is fundamental yet challenging, emphasizing its importance in validating children’s emotions. Practical Application: Step-by-step guidance on how to reflect feelings accurately, from recognizing nonverbal cues to matching your verbal responses with your child's emotional states. Real-Life Scenarios: Examples of how to apply the Reflecting Feelings skill throughout the day, from positive expressions like joy and pride to handling negative emotions like disappointment and frustration. We delve into how consistent practice of this skill helps build a stronger, more empathetic connection with your child, enabling them to feel heard and understood. This connection is crucial for their emotional development and can significantly enhance your effectiveness as a parent. Call to Action: This week, I challenge you to consciously practice reflecting feelings with your children. Notice the multitude of opportunities you have to engage this skill, and observe the positive impact it has on your interactions. For more insights and to continue this conversation, don’t hesitate to reach out via email at brenna@thekidcounselor.com or leave a message at (813) 812-5525. Your feedback and questions are invaluable, and they help us shape future content that meets your needs. Remember, the journey to calm, confident, and in-control parenting continues with each skill we master. Let's keep learning and growing together. Thank you for joining me today, and I look forward to our next session! Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/ References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley.  VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press.  Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode, I address a question submitted by a therapist on behalf of a concerned parent. The parent has a 6-year-old girl who is grappling with body image issues. As this little girl expresses concerns about her tummy being "fat" and worries that other kids are judging her, her mother fears she may be using food to soothe her big emotions.   These behaviors are merely cues, signaling deeper underlying issues that need to be addressed. More often than not, a child's fixation on food, sleep, or obedience stems from a profound need for control or a manifestation of high anxiety levels.   Through the lens of child-centered play therapy, we can unravel the root causes and provide lasting solutions. By reflecting her feelings, giving her choices, and fostering her self-esteem through encouragement, we empower this young girl to develop an emotional vocabulary, self-regulation, and a healthy sense of self-worth – the very tools she needs to overcome her body image struggles.   Remember, the behavior itself is not the problem; it's a window into her internal world. As we guide her through this journey, she'll naturally internalize self-acceptance, regardless of her physical appearance. The path to healing lies in addressing the core emotional needs, not just the surface symptoms. With patience, empathy, and a child-centered approach, she can develop resilience and confidence.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
I can't emphasize enough the profound impact of encouragement on a child's self-esteem, self-worth, and overall development. Unlike the other pillars we've discussed, encouragement stands alone as a powerful tool that shapes a child's understanding of their identity, capabilities, and innate value.   In this episode, we delve deep into the crucial distinction between praise and encouragement. Praise, although well-intentioned, often includes value judgments that inadvertently make children dependent on external validation. On the other hand, encouragement focuses solely on the child's efforts and contributions, fostering an internal locus of control – a sense of motivation that comes from within.   I challenge you to become more aware of when you slip into praising your child and consciously pivot to encouragement instead. Start your sentences with "you" – "You worked really hard on that!" or "You used so many colors in your painting!" This simple shift empowers your child to celebrate their efforts, embrace challenges, and find fulfillment in their own accomplishments, regardless of the outcome.   Remember, self-esteem is the foundation for almost all positive change in a child. When we encourage our children, we nurture their confidence, resilience, and belief in themselves. This, in turn, transforms their interactions, relationships, and overall behavior in self-enhancing ways.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode, I answer a question from Hayley in Australia, dealing with a common issue many parents face: sibling conflict. Hayley has been diligently applying the principles we discuss here, such as getting down to her children's level, validating their feelings, and setting limits, yet she’s not seeing the positive changes she hoped for, especially when it comes to her children hitting each other.   I address the importance of neutral phrasing in limit setting, the impact of birth order on sibling dynamics, and the necessity of providing alternative choices to undesirable behavior. I also touch on the significance of keeping our interventions brief and to the point, as our children’s attention spans are limited.   If you're grappling with similar challenges or have any questions about parenting, I encourage you to reach out to me at brenna@thekidcounselor.com or leave a voice message at (813) 812-5525.   Also, remember to subscribe to our newsletter at www.playtherapyparenting.com for more insights and resources. If you subscribe today, I'll send you a video of a workshop I conducted on Birth Order... a topic I discussed in today's podcast!   This episode is a testament to the complexities of parenting and understanding and responding to our children’s needs. Thank you, Hayley, for your vulnerability and for allowing us to learn from your experiences.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I address a heartfelt question from Corinne about how to navigate conversations with her five-year-old son regarding his grandmother's ALS diagnosis. Corinne's concern resonates with many parents who grapple with discussing difficult topics with their children. I emphasize the importance of sharing age-appropriate truth with kids, providing simple explanations in response to their questions, and being prepared for future discussions as their understanding evolves. By focusing on alleviating confusion and unknowns, we can support our children through challenging times while nurturing our relationships with them. Join me as I offer practical advice and encouragement to Corinne and parents facing similar situations.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In today's episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, we're exploring choice giving. Choice giving empowers children by offering them opportunities to make decisions and exercise control in their lives. By providing choices within established boundaries, parents can help children develop decision-making skills, reduce power struggles, and foster a sense of ownership over outcomes. I emphasize the importance of setting mutually agreeable parameters for choices and I explain practical examples, such as allowing children to choose their lunch fruit or the timing of their bath. Through consistent implementation of choice giving, parents can create a healthy dynamic with their children, build their decision-making abilities, and minimize conflicts.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I discuss a common parenting challenge: how to handle big emotions in kids, especially when they're directed at siblings. I relate a scenario shared by Heather from Florida, who struggles with regulating her own emotions while helping her three boys navigate theirs. I discuss the importance of reflecting feelings and understanding the underlying causes of behavior, such as feelings of powerlessness. Also, I give some strategies, such as choice-giving and limit-setting to address these situations.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In today's episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, we're diving into the first pillar of child-centered play therapy, which is reflecting feelings. This foundational skill is all about acknowledging and validating our children's emotions. Remembering that kids aren't rational beings, we have to meet them in their emotional world rather than expecting them to understand ours. By reflecting their feelings, we help them build an emotional vocabulary and effectively communicate their needs, instead of acting out their needs via unacceptable behavior. Through simple steps like starting with "you" and accurately identifying their emotions, we can make a big difference in our children's emotional development. I challenge you to try reflecting your child's feelings at least once a day this week and see the impact it has on your relationship. Don't worry if it doesn't go perfectly at first, just keep practicing. Feel free to reach out to me with any questions or scenarios you'd like advice on, and don't forget to sign up for my newsletter at www.playtherapyparenting.com for more helpful content.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
I'm thrilled to be back on the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast after taking a little break.  So, welcome to Season Two!   During my hiatus, I've been busy launching training programs for clinicians and welcoming a new therapist at my center. Now, I'm excited to share some changes with you.   In this episode, I announce a new direction for the podcast: it will be more curriculum-driven, offering you a "master class" in parenting based in child-centered play therapy.   Today, I want to talk about the most fundamental concept in parenting: the understanding that kids aren't rational. It's crucial for us, as parents, to meet our children where they are emotionally and recognize that their feelings, not their brains often drive their behavior! By embracing this perspective, we can transform our interactions with our kids and build stronger, more empathetic relationships.   I'm also considering adding a new Q&A segment based on your questions and scenarios, so feel free to reach out with any parenting dilemmas you'd like me to address.  brenna@thekidcounselor.com or call (813) 812-5525 to leave a voicemail.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, we continue our journey through the four pillars of child-centered play therapy. Having covered reflecting feelings and choice giving, we now explore the third pillar, limit setting.   Limit setting is essential in teaching children how to understand and respect boundaries. It's a skill that combines the empathy and understanding we've discussed with clear, consistent guidelines. I give practical strategies for implementing limit setting in a way that supports your child's emotional and behavioral development.   If you have a question about limit setting, or any other parenting topic, feel free to reach out to me at brenna@thekidcounselor.com or leave a voice message at (813) 812-5525.   Stay tuned for more insights and remember to subscribe to our newsletter for additional resources at www.playtherapyparenting.com.   Ask Me Questions:  Call ‪(813) 812-5525‬, or email: brenna@thekidcounselor.com Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I explore the analogy of a compass and how it relates to parenting. I delve into the fact that a compass doesn't actually point to True North, contrary to popular belief. This realization led me to reflect on the parenting journey, highlighting the freedom found in acknowledging that, just like a compass, we may not always be heading in the "perfect" direction.   I emphasize the importance of understanding that parenting isn't about attaining perfection but about navigating with intention and the right tools. I encourage listeners to embrace mistakes, take responsibility, and apologize when needed, as it not only sets an example for children but also frees us from the unrealistic pressure of being flawless parents.   By framing parenting through the lens of intentional direction rather than the pursuit of perfection, it's okay not to have a fixed, unwavering path.   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I explore the profound meaning behind a Winston Churchill quote and its application to parenting. I delve into the concept of absolute truth, drawing parallels between the quote and the truths we encounter in parenting.   I highlight three incontrovertible truths:   Parenthood is a conscious choice and responsibility. When we decide to have children, we inherently accept the duty to parent them well. It's vital to shift the mindset from viewing children as burdens to understanding that parenting is a fulfilling obligation.   Children require specific elements from parents—kindness, patience, consistency, and modeling behavior. I stress the significance of parents demonstrating the behaviors and traits they wish to instill in their children, establishing mutual trust as the foundation of a healthy relationship.   Acknowledging personal faults and aiming to surpass generational patterns is crucial. I encourage listeners to evolve, improve, and be intentional about becoming better parents than previous generations, highlighting the importance of continual learning and growth.   Even amid challenges, parenting remains a gift. I urge you to embrace gratitude for the opportunity to nurture and guide your children. The commitment to evolving as parents ultimately shapes not just our children's lives but generations to come.   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I take a deep dive into praise vs encouragement from a child-centered play therapy standpoint.   Building upon the previous episode's overview, I recount a conversation with a house parent at the Hope Children's Home who raised a question about a parenting approach he overheard. The person avoids telling his kids he's proud of them, opting for "what you did just brought me great joy" instead. While the intention is to encourage emotional maturity and other orientation, I explore why this statement falls into the category of "pseudo praise".   I explain the importance of fostering an internal locus of control in children, emphasizing the dangers of external validation dependence. Drawing on research, including a longitudinal study, I underscore the long-term positive effects of encouragement over praise. I challenge listeners to break away from the pervasive praise model and become the antidote to the praise epidemic. Throughout the episode, I stress the significance of using encouragement consistently and provide practical insights for implementing child-centered play therapy parenting. Tune in for a deep dive into the power of encouragement and its role in raising resilient, internally motivated children.   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
In this episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, we get "back to basics" of the Play Therapy Parenting model. I've shared an extensive range of insights over the last 124 episodes and as more listeners join the podcast family, I thought it was time to reflect on the basics.   Recently, I had the privilege of conducting a 7-hour training of the house parents and staff at Hope Children's Home (https://hopechildrenshome.org/), a remarkable foster care agency. The experience inspired me to reflect on the foundations of my approach and the child-centered play therapy model.   This episode takes a deep dive into critical concepts. Kids aren't rational—they're driven by emotions, not cognitive reasoning. Understanding this shapes the approach to interactions. It's about reflecting feelings, offering choices, setting limits, and providing encouragement. The goal is always preserving a healthy relationship with our kids.   If you're catching this for the first time or need a refresher, these principles are pivotal. They create a framework to interact with our children effectively. Remember, the relationship with our kids stands above all else. In case you'd like to get in touch, feel free to reach out at brenna@thekidcounselor.com. I'm here to support you.   Mentioned in this episode: Hope Children's Home - https://hopechildrenshome.org/ Rules of Thumb all come from Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents by Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006)   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/   References: Cochran, N., Nordling, W., & Cochran, J. (2010). Child-Centered Play Therapy (1st ed.). Wiley. VanFleet, R., Sywulak, A. E., & Sniscak, C. C. (2010). Child-centered play therapy. Guilford Press. Landreth, G. L. (2002). Play therapy: The art of the relationship (2nd ed.). Brunner-Routledge. Bratton, S. C., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R. (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10-session filial therapy model for training parents. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Benedict, Helen. Themes in Play Therapy. Used with permission to Heartland Play Therapy Institute.
I frequently hear from parents something along the line of "My kid is so manipulative!" I'd like to challenge the notion that kids are manipulating parents and others around them and give you a new perspective and re-frame for you what exactly kids are doing that parents interpret as being manipulative.   In this episode of the podcast, I discuss the following topics:   The concept of abstract reasoning Organic, natural cause of "manipulation" Kids don't have alternatives when they are stuck in a pattern of behavior   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
Listener Stephanie emailed me with a follow-up question to my episode titled: "'I Hate My Life!' – What To Do When Your Child Says This, Or Other Shocking Things" and described a few situations where her 7-year-old son reacts with shocking responses, but the reflecting feelings process didn't work as expected. In this episode, I give Stephanie some follow-up advice on using the reflecting feelings skill with some advanced tips to help when it feels like reflecting feelings isn't working.   The depth of the feeling impacts the recovery. The larger the emotion, the more time it may take for feeling reflection to take effect. It's not an instant fix. Enlarge the meaning You always reflect on the new feeling that was most recently expressed Bonus tip: Provide alternatives (later)   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
A listener to the podcast emailed me a question regarding explaining dating and remarriage to young children. In this episode, I discuss the related topics related to this matter.   Age appropriate truth Neutral discussions without emotion Setting expectations   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
Listeners Dan and Clay emailed me similar questions regarding "roadblocks" in the choice-giving process. In this episode, I discuss the following topics:   The purpose behind why we give choices Hindrances to the choice-giving process (congruence, choices given only in negative situations, understanding the "why") Kids need opportunities to practice receiving choices   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
"Only acts of war and the events of natural disasters are more harmful to a child's psyche than the divorce process" - American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, 1997   In this episode, I'm going to talk about the following topics from a child's perspective: Change The emotional processing of a divorce vs the rational side Trust, safety, and security   Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
"When I look back, knowing what I know now, there were signs..."   In this special episode of the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, I had the privilege to interview Jason Reid, founder of Tell My Story (www.tellmystory.org) and Choose Life (www.chooselife.org). May is Mental Health Awareness month, and Jason, who lost his 14-year-old son to suicide, is determined to reach every parent and every family about the conversation they need to have with their kids.   Jason's mission has enlarged from informing parents about the signs of suicide in kids, to overall mental health awareness in kids and adults.   Visit Jason's organizations: Tell My Story - https://tellmystory.org/ Choose Life - https://www.chooselife.org/   Songs for the Drive Home: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLl9DqLcFH-0J_xyePQGp-CSfKGXJFSyTW   Tell My Story documentary trailer: https://wellbeings.org/films/tell-my-story/     Follow me on Twitter: @thekidcounselor Podcast HQ: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/ My Newsletter Signup: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/newsletter/ My Podcast Partner, Gabb Wireless: https://www.playtherapyparenting.com/gabb/
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Welcome to the Play Therapy Parenting Podcast, where we explore the transformative power of play in nurturing healthy parent-child relationships. In today's episode, we discuss the importance of engaging children in imaginative play to foster emotional growth and communication. As an example of the creative potential of play, consider the fascinating art of crafting hidden tang knives. To learn more about this intriguing process, check out this link: [https://bakeree.io/ipfs-plans/] Join us as we delve into the world of play therapy and discover ways to strengthen the bond with your little ones through the magic of play. Tune in now for expert insights and practical tips on how to make playtime an enriching and joyous experience for both parents and children.

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