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What’s a Hard Fork?

What’s a Hard Fork?

2022-09-2701:28

Hosts Kevin Roose and Casey Newton explore stories from the wild frontier of tech.What’s real? What’s hype? “Hard Fork” is here to help you make sense of it. Tune in on Friday, Oct. 7.
Stay tuned for “Hard Fork,” a new podcast from The New York Times that comes Friday, Oct. 7 to this feed.If you’re looking for “Sway” with Kara Swisher, you can search for older episodes in any podcast app or at nytimes.com/sway.
Best Of: Jon Stewart

Best Of: Jon Stewart

2022-07-2850:192

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the comedian and former Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, taped in March 2022. This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the actor and self-proclaimed ‘statesman-philosopher, folk-singing poet’ Matthew McConaughey, taped in October 2021.This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Best Of: Stacey Abrams

Best Of: Stacey Abrams

2022-07-2145:32

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the Georgia gubernatorial candidate and Democratic powerhouse Stacey Abrams, taped in March 2021.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Best Of: Jason Miller

Best Of: Jason Miller

2022-07-1847:19

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the longtime Trump adviser and C.E.O. of Gettr Jason Miller, taped in August 2021.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Best Of: Fran Lebowitz

Best Of: Fran Lebowitz

2022-07-1438:381

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the humorist and famed New Yorker Fran Lebowitz, taped in February 2021.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
This month Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes — usually of Sway. But today she has another show to share with you: First Person.In this episode of the New York Times Opinion podcast, host Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Jerri Ann Henry, a former leader of the Log Cabin Republicans, an outspoken group of gay conservatives. Henry used to thinkher party was moving toward accepting gay rights, but with G.O.P. legislators backing anti-L.G.T.B.Q. laws in several states and the constitutional right to same-sex marriage potentially threatened after the reversal of Roe v. Wade, she now finds herself wondering whether she still has a place in the Republican Party — or any party.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Best Of: Monica Lewinsky

Best Of: Monica Lewinsky

2022-07-0747:292

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this interview with Monica Lewinsky, the producer, activist and — yes — former White House intern. We taped this conversation in October 2021.This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Best Of: Elon Musk

Best Of: Elon Musk

2022-07-0445:092

This month, Kara is revisiting some of her favorite episodes of Sway — including this conversation with the Tesla C.E.O., Elon Musk, taped in September 2020.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Kara in the Hot Seat

Kara in the Hot Seat

2022-06-3047:151

As the show comes to a close, it felt fitting to save the most elusive guest for last: Kara Swisher herself.In this conversation with the senior editor of “Sway,” Nayeema Raza, Kara revisits major moments from her year and a half of interviews — from a dropped Zoom call with Nancy Pelosi to a raw interrogation of Parler’s C.E.O., John Matze, which was taped as the Jan. 6 Capitol attack unfolded. They talk about the guests who got away (like Dolly Parton), the ones they could have been harder on and how Kara thinks about her own power, or sway. And they tackle questions in an AMA, or “ask me anything,” format, fielding listeners’ questions about what start-ups were before their time and which tech titans need more scrutiny. Kara also answers questions from the former “Sway” guests Jon Stewart, Walt Mossberg and Mark Cuban.This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway.And you can find Kara and Nayeema on Twitter — @karaswisher and @nayeema.
Stocks tumbling, inflation soaring and interest rates climbing — it’s clear America’s economy has hit some turbulence. And yet President Biden says a recession is “not inevitable.” Andrew Ross Sorkin, the founder and editor at large of DealBook at The New York Times, sat down with Kara Swisher to unpack our economic woes, predict what happens next and diagnose what Washington could have done differently.In this conversation, they discuss how the pandemic highlighted our economic dependence on China and helped pave the way for both a crypto boom and the subsequent bear market. They break down the futures of companies from Netflix and Disney to Coinbase and Twitter, and discuss whether activist employees will continue to wield power with their corporate employers. And Andrew helps explain why airfares are so damn expensive.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Instagram, Twitter and TikTok can monopolize all of your time, driven by what the novelist Jennifer Egan calls humankind’s “ongoing hunger for authenticity.” But to Egan, social media is not a winning strategy for discovering what’s real or true: “Looking to the internet for authentic experience is just inherently a loser,” she says. The digital world, after all, offers only an “illusion of authenticity.”In her newest novel, “The Candy House” — set in the same universe as her Pulitzer Prize-winning “A Visit From the Goon Squad” — Egan paints a picture of a world where the search for authenticity becomes so ubiquitous that people can choose to upload their memories — and entire consciousnesses — to a collective archive, and then share them for the world to see.In this conversation, Kara Swisher and Egan discuss how far Silicon Valley is from accessing our consciousnesses and introducing this kind of dystopian technology. They debate how social media has changed the world and whether there is still room for optimism. And Kara tries to decipher which tech founder, if any, inspired Egan’s protagonist, whom Kara describes as Mark Zuckerberg with “the soul of Steve Jobs.” (Egan, for the record, denies all comparisons.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Raphael Warnock claims he’s not a politician, though he certainly sounds like one and serves as one. The U.S. senator from Georgia, who has long been the pastor at Martin Luther King Jr.’s former church, says that his “entry into politics is an extension” of his work on a range of what he sees as moral issues, such as health care, criminal-justice reform and voting rights.Warnock became Georgia’s first Black senator in January 2021, when he narrowly beat the Republican incumbent, Kelly Loeffler, in a special runoff election. And he is set for yet another tough political battle ahead, against Herschel Walker, the former N.F.L. player, who in addition to his celebrity status also has an endorsement from Donald Trump. The stakes are high: “God knows these days, the Senate needs a soul,” Warnock says.In this conversation, Kara Swisher talks to Warnock about his path from the pulpit to the Senate and the religious journey he traces in his recent memoir, “A Way Out of No Way.” She presses him on whether he can beat his celebrity opponent and asks what shadow Trump casts on this election. And they discuss the contrast between the jubilation he felt on his history-making victory and the horror that unfolded less than 24 hours later, as a mob attacked his “new office,” the Capitol, on Jan. 6.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Chris Dixon is one of Silicon Valley’s most ardent crypto-evangelists. A general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, he leads a16z Crypto, which invests in web3. At the beginning of the year, his proselytizing seemed to be paying off: Bitcoin had doubled in value in the last half of 2021, NFTs were all the rage, and crypto seemed poised for mainstream acceptance. Nowhere was this more evident than the Super Bowl broadcast, crammed with cryptocurrency ads featuring celebrities like LeBron James, Matt Damon and even the curmudgeonly Larry David.But it’s all come crashing down. This week, Bitcoin reached its lowest point in 18 months — at just above $23,000 — and Ethereum is worth about a quarter of its November peak. The cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase announced it was laying off nearly 20 percent of its work force while the crypto-lending platform Celsius paused withdrawals, in a moment that looked a lot like the run on the banks in the film “It’s a Wonderful Life.”In this conversation, Kara Swisher asks Dixon if we’re watching the beginning of an all-out crash for the industry. They discuss parallels to the 2008 financial crisis, dig into how much of crypto is “scam at scale,” and contemplate what regulation from the government could help. And they talk about whether web3 will really be the decentralized utopia enthusiasts paint it to be, another iteration of an internet that profits too few, or something in between.This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
What if Silicon Valley’s next big frontier were not web3 but climate change? That’s the bet the venture capitalist John Doerr is making: Doerr, the billionaire author of “Speed and Scale: An Action Plan for Solving Our Climate Crisis Now,” recently donated $1.1 billion to Stanford University to fund a new school focused on climate and sustainability, describing climate science as “the new computer science.” But with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest assessment noting that the dangers of climate change are building rapidly, piles of cash and a burst of brain power may prove too little, too late.In this conversation, Kara Swisher asks Doerr whether Silicon Valley can save the planet and what President Biden and all of Washington must do to honor the country’s goal to halve emissions by 2030. She presses him on whether lobbying for a carbon tax, mobilizing voters or even louder naming and shaming of fossil fuel companies may be a better use of Doerr’s dollars. And they discuss Elon Musk’s contribution to a sustainable future — with Doerr noting why he (wrongly) overlooked Tesla in its early days — and whether Apple’s potential moves in the EV market would sit well with the company’s founder, Steve Jobs.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
The House’s Jan. 6 committee is going prime-time. On Thursday, its members, with Representative Liz Cheney, Republican of Wyoming, serving as vice chair, will present findings in hearings televised throughout June on all major networks (except Fox News). But will Americans watch? Or care?In this conversation, Kara Swisher breaks down the hearings with the former Obama senior adviser David Axelrod, the Republican strategist Sarah Longwell and the former U.S. attorney Preet Bharara. They discuss the downsides of prime time and the imperative to engage Americans on social media in this landmark moment for democracy. They also talk about what key moments and witnesses to watch for in the hearings and whether any revelations will, as one committee member, Jamie Raskin of Maryland, suggested, “blow the roof off the House.”You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Tech stocks may be under pressure, but the tentacles of Silicon Valley continue to grow, inching us closer to the dystopian world Dave Eggers paints in “The Every.” The novel imagines a world where the fictional equivalent of Google and Amazon merge to form an all-knowing corporate juggernaut that can program our every moment. Kara is revisiting her conversation with Eggers, which was taped in September.In this conversation, which first aired in September, Kara and Eggers discuss the inspiration behind his latest Silicon Valley satire. They dig into Eggers’s tech skepticism — the author says he still uses a flip phone. They also discuss the challenges that Amazon’s rapidly growing market share poses for smaller publishing houses like Eggers’s own company, McSweeney’s.Kara will be back on Thursday with a new episode.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Elon Musk swept Twitter off its feet in April, when he put in a bid to buy the company for $44 billion. But the impassioned beginnings of this acquisition have cooled down in the weeks since, as Musk has raised concerns about the inner workings of the company he agreed to buy essentially sight unseen (he did not conduct due diligence before he agreed to buy the social media platform). As the New York Times tech columnist Kevin Roose puts it, the deal is starting to look “like an arranged marriage that’s sort of going sour.” Musk has invoked concerns about spam and fake accounts on the site, as well as privacy considerations. And the billionaire has gone so far as to tweet that the deal is “temporarily on hold” before clarifying that he is “still committed to acquisition.” But a breakup between Musk and Twitter would make for a difficult, costly and very public divorce.In this conversation, Kara Swisher takes stock of the Twitter-Musk marriage with Roose and William Cohan, a business writer and founding partner at Puck. They break down the balance of power between Musk and Twitter and discuss why Musk even wants the company. And Cohan breaks down how the math clears — after all, even with help from a potpourri of wealthy investors, including Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison and Prince Alwaleed bin Talal of Saudi Arabia, there are still questions about how Musk, the richest person in the world, will find the tens of billions of dollars he needs to close this deal.This episode contains strong language.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
“Top Gun: Maverick” is expected to be one of the first blockbusters of the summer. But as streaming platforms proliferate and movie theaters continue to struggle, is a movie that was designed to be seen on the biggest screen possible be able to lure audiences back to theaters? David Ellison thinks so. He’s the founder and C.E.O. of Skydance Media, the company behind the film, as well as other action franchise reboots like “Mission: Impossible” and “Terminator.”In this conversation, Kara Swisher talks to Ellison about working with Tom Cruise, who flew his own planes for “Top Gun: Maverick.” She digs into how Ellison’s heritage (he’s the son of the billionaire Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison) factored into his future as a filmmaker and the advice he got from his dad’s friend Steve Jobs. And David Ellison responds to Kara’s question about the news that his father joined a November 2020 phone call with Senator Lindsey Graham and Sean Hannity, among others, about contesting Trump’s loss.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.
Comments (41)

Golden boy

Delusional lefties

Sep 20th
Reply

squogg

This was such a wonderful interview. I'm officially subscribing to first person. Thanks for the recommendation!

Jul 12th
Reply

Chris Abele

On the discovery channel, the "American Chopper"-show gave everyone a clue how easy it is to build a "one of", a prototype. :)

Jul 8th
Reply

Maciej Czech

Finally somebody strong who can stand up to Kara's pushed statements

Jul 2nd
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Sasha Lyn

Overwhelmed with choice? I think not. The problem is one of quality not quantity. Also, your average person was being asked to 'subscribe and pay' for more than anyone could pay for and that was before COVID, the war, inflation etc...The cost of living has spiked far higher than what we earn - whoch hasn't increased since- when? I honestly don't remember but it feels the same as 20 years ago.

May 17th
Reply

Sasha Lyn

Most of the college kids I've seen interviewed by small youtubers whisper Nalvany under the breathe. The adults spout state TV propaganda.

May 9th
Reply

Black Mirror

If Dalio thinks the solution to income inequality is to "increase productivity," why doesn't he pick up his soft doughy ass and get a real job? This man provides absolutely nothing to anyone

May 3rd
Reply

Cami Decker

"We don't talk about Trump-o" -- haha! Encanto is everywhere.

Feb 4th
Reply

Carlton _

I've never heard anyone call themselves honest as many times in my life as Katie Couric just called herself in 43 minutes.

Nov 1st
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Kathleen Marcove

I usually love Kara's interviews... this one made me uncomfortable... the questions were tough, I felt Katie was honest, but put on the defense which took away from the interview. I especially did not appreciate at all the line of questioning about why she didn't rat out Matt Lauer... she worked with him 15 years ago... it WAS a different time, she was his peer (likely competitor) on the show. She stated no one came to her with specific complaints, it was not keeping her from doing her job, it seemed gossip was rampant in the Today Show's workplace... what was Katie supposed to do? Why was it her responsibility given the situation she described and her position. Not to mention it has been found that the executives at NBC knew all along, paid people off to keep them quiet, put a button on his desk to lock the door so people like Katie didn't walk in on him doing bad deeds... if she has said anything without a specific complaint, something she saw or something someone else had reported to her she would have looked like she was after his job--you know that is how she would have been regarded...Kara, would you have drilled down like this if you were interviewing Al Roker...a man in the same work place?

Nov 1st
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Bea Kiddo

I love Adam Schiff. I wish he could be president. He’s one of the rare honest men in our government.

Oct 15th
Reply (1)

Sasha Lyn

I used to go to the movie theater regularly but now when the idea is raised, I get stressed out about the coat and immediately I start to weighing. That sweet, nostalgic description of what makes the theater going experience superior is so insulting and redundant- most people are aware of all the perks. Between the overpriced tickets and the horrible feeling of being robbed after buying popcorn and soda from a fountain - I am left with a bad taste in my mouth especially when most of the screens are so tiny. If theater go out of business, they get what they deserve.

Aug 23rd
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AJB

Getr- Where facts, science and truth goes to die

Aug 19th
Reply

Sasha Lyn

So basically- go on to Gettr app if you want the freedom to lie. By the same token, do not go here if you are interested in reliable factual information. sounds like a party! Who cares about STANDARDS? I do.

Aug 19th
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Thomas Albert

Few actors who start at an early age turn into really good actors. Levitt drops all the usual bombs about "being grateful" and oh-so-lucky to have all the opportunities he has had. By the way, did you know he is the father of two. In the end, it's all more disillusioning than hopeful. Buzz words indeed. Let's talk I 20 years, Levitt, because at 40 you sound as canned as Campbell's soup.

Aug 19th
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cse

greedy capitalist pig.

Aug 12th
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Sasha Lyn

while Dick Pound sounds like an honorable fellow,, I truly hope that the IOC contains younger members who can problem solve the potential problems that will come up with the issues of the day. Who is not outraged that Marijuana, containing no athletic benefit and legal in most of Canada!, is outlawed and has prevented a world class athlete from participating in Tokyo. Meanwhile...we know doping is banned but you only have to use your eyes to see that it is rampant amongst the competitors.

Jul 19th
Reply

Sasha Lyn

A podcast is essentially radio and if you don't have a first rate talking voice with deep soothing tones, husky, honeyed, quiet and serious, breathy- anything but SHRILL then you should be off-mic and writing.

Jul 12th
Reply

Mike Zieper

love the new photo

Jun 21st
Reply

Rik Landon

Swisher-I almost solely wrote you off as a political in your face militant, same-sex married, gay rights advocate. I'm glad I didn't! you are clearly one of the smartest persons in the room and although I don't see eye to eye with you on the gay rights issue you are clearly one of the best at landing great interviews, asking tough questions, and cut through the b*******.

Jun 3rd
Reply
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