DiscoverTexas Monthly True Crime: Shane and Sally
Texas Monthly True Crime: Shane and Sally
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Texas Monthly True Crime: Shane and Sally

Author: Texas Monthly

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On July 4, 1988, 16-year-old Shane Stewart and 18-year-old Sally McNelly went out for the night in the West Texas town of San Angelo. They watched the fireworks, stopped for burgers, and drove to the lake outside of town. They were never seen alive again.

For 35 years, their murders have haunted their family and friends, and frustrated generations of investigators from the local police to the FBI. Hosts Rob D’Amico and Karen Jacobs take listeners behind the scenes of the cold case investigation, interviewing witnesses and following the twists and turns that have confounded authorities—including accusations about corruption, occult rituals, and a hunt for one suspect halfway around the world—tracking down new leads in the hope that someone may come forward to finally help solve the case.

From the Texas Monthly team behind “Tom Brown’s Body” and “Stephenville” comes another true story of crime, suspicion, and life and death in small-town Texas.

For more Texas Monthly productions, visit texasmonthly.com/podcasts
28 Episodes
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Sharing White Devil, a new podcast from our friends at Campside Media. Late at night in May of 2021, a single gunshot shattered the silence along the beach at Belize’s luxurious Alaia resort. In White Devil, Josh Dean dives into one of the biggest, splashiest, and most perplexing crime stories you’ve never heard: The shooting death of renowned cop Henry Jemott by a Canadian property developer. In investigating, the craggy depths of Belize are brought to the surface: Its quirks, its corruption, and the all pervasive influence of one family in particular. You can binge the rest of White Devil https://link.chtbl.com/texasmonthlywhitedevil
“Someone is lying. And it’s hard to know who’s lying and who’s not.”
"My gut tells me he hasn't left Hemphill County. I think he's here somewhere, and I don't know if he intends to come out in the next day or two."
"Makes you want to go to the church, get on your knees and say a few words, right?
"I'm sitting there thinking, 'Oh God, I'm so scared right now.' I couldn't convince them. And so I just let them hammer me."
“It's kind of strange that your investigator calls this search, and lo and behold, right after he starts the search, a cell phone is found.”
"I'm like, 'What the heck is that?' So, I walk around some shrubs, and as I get closer I can see that it kind of looks like bone."
"The people of the town are calling us and saying, 'Do we have a monster that lives in our community?' I wish I could give them Solace."
"I'm definitely more paranoid wherever I go. I definitely watch my back more and pay attention to what's going on around me."
There have finally been a couple of developments in the case. But will they lead to the truth about what happened to Tom?
"I'll never lose that hope. It could be five years from today. The door is always open at our office for anything that will bring resolution to this case."
Stephenville | Trailer

Stephenville | Trailer

2023-06-1303:43

From the moment Susan Woods was found dead at home in the summer of 1987, everyone in Stephenville, Texas—including the police—was certain she’d been killed by her estranged husband.That left the real culprit free to prey on others. In "Stephenville," best-selling author Bryan Burrough returns to his small-town Texas roots to explore a murder case that went cold for nearly two decades. Only now, after discovering a voice from beyond the grave, can the whole story finally be told—a story about the secrets that got buried, and how some folks in this town helped keep them that way.From the Texas Monthly team behind "Tom Brown’s Body" comes another true story of crime, suspicion, and life in small-town Texas. Coming June 20.
Stephenville | 1. Susan

Stephenville | 1. Susan

2023-06-2046:052

In the summer of 1987, 30-year-old Susan Woods was living alone in her hometown of Stephenville, Texas, piecing her life back together after being abandoned by her husband. Then, one sweltering July evening, Susan’s father came to check on her. For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
After Susan Woods was killed, just about everyone in Stephenville—including the police—figured they knew who’d done it. Her estranged husband, Michael Woods, was a long-haired biker who smoked pot and played rock music—a complete misfit in the “Cowboy Capital of the World.” For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
Stephenville | 3. Don

Stephenville | 3. Don

2023-06-2730:20

Nearly twenty years after Susan Woods's murder, Stephenville Police Lieutenant Don Miller takes up the case. And with Michael Woods's cooperation, and help from new technology, Don finally makes a break in the case. But what he uncovers raises even more questions about why Susan was killed—and how her killer evaded justice for so long.For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
In 1988, Shannon Myers survived a brutal attack by Joseph Scott Hatley, the man whose fingerprints were also present at the scene of Susan Woods’s murder. Her statement to police—which included his chilling confession—created an opportunity to put Hatley behind bars for both crimes.For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
Lt. Don Miller discovers the hand-written life story of the man who killed Susan Woods. The murderer, it turns out, wasn't a stranger or an outsider to Stephenville, but a local boy nobody suspected.For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
In the series finale, Scott Hatley’s journal tells the story of how he built a new life on the run from police. And when the truth comes out, people in Stephenville must confront how little they knew about the man who killed Susan Woods.For more on this and every episode, visit texasmonthly.com/stephenville
On July 4, 1988, 16-year-old Shane Stewart and 18-year-old Sally McNelly went out for the night in the West Texas town of San Angelo. They watched the fireworks, stopped for burgers, and drove to the lake outside of town. They were never seen alive again.For 35 years, their murders have haunted their family and friends, and frustrated generations of investigators from the local police to the FBI. Hosts Rob D’Amico and Karen Jacobs take listeners behind the scenes of the cold case investigation, interviewing witnesses and following the twists and turns that have confounded authorities—including accusations about corruption, occult rituals, and a hunt for one suspect halfway around the world—tracking down new leads in the hope that someone may come forward to finally help solve the case.From the Texas Monthly team behind “Tom Brown’s Body” and “Stephenville” comes another true story of crime, suspicion, and life and death in small-town Texas. Coming March 19.For more Texas Monthly productions, visit texasmonthly.com/podcasts
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Comments (84)

Claire Cantwell

Major paper-crinkling ASMR around 25:00.

May 23rd
Reply

Selina Jahan Sathi

⭕𝗪𝗔𝗧𝗖𝗛➤𝗗𝗢𝗪𝗡𝗟𝗢𝗔𝗗➤𝗛𝗘𝗥𝗘➤👉https://www.justhd.online

Apr 19th
Reply

azim poorandokht

خیلی خوب توضیح میدادی دمت گرم.

Mar 5th
Reply

Mike H

the father didn't even come to the search...?

Dec 12th
Reply

June Rusty Turner

sheesh! background music, enough already!🤦

Sep 14th
Reply

Lin

I'm listening to this hoping for an actual conclusion and all I hear is complete bullsh*t! This is made up bad movie plot garbage. Klein asks who you'd want investigating if this happened to you, definitely NOT this grand standing, self-glorifying, publicity obsessed fool! I cannot believe he is taking money from this grieving family and giving them this in return. He is taking complete advantage of desperate people. So many liars, so many stories, so many personal grudges, so many irrelevant opinions.

Mar 11th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

what a waste of time this show is.. if you hope to come to any conclusion except for the sheriff is a moron the state inspectors are morons and the private inspector is a moron there's no reason to listen to this show

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

the Texas district attorney acting like he has the high road. this guy puts people in jail for nothing day in and day out

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

the sheriff fails a polygraph test the sheriff gives excuses for not wanting to take the polygraph test but the sheriff at the same time would have done this to any other citizen and screamed in his face that he failed so he was guilty

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

don't worry sheriff Lewis has already been thrown out of office and is under investigation for lying and changing documents that are about this investigation

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

and don't forget sheriff Lewis also was investigated and resigned for falsifying documentation and lying while being a sheriff so don't believe anything that that sheriff says he's a f****** liar and anybody wearing a badge is anyways

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

Texas ranger Michael Smith is no longer a Texas ranger for inappropriate action so if that tells you enough that tells you enough

Nov 27th
Reply

Ryan Phillips

the big problem is is the sheriff is an incompetent idiot. this case requires police with intelligence education and skills which the sheriff and his team lack.. it doesn't take brains to kick down the door it takes brains to solve a missing person

Nov 27th
Reply

Ma

it wont play

Mar 9th
Reply

Megan

the most asinine thing about thinking the mom is ashamedly covering up a suicide, and dwelling on that idea? she is the one who brought up the possibility of suicide in the first place and also the fact that it ran in her family. that is where everything turned straight to sh#$. way to twist things around everyone so you don't have to do your damn jobs.

Feb 13th
Reply

Megan

the resigned sheriff's response to the latest theory is making me very uncomfortable.

Feb 13th
Reply

Megan

Water under the bridge but for the sake of finding Tom and finding out what happened to him, I wish two particular men had not brought awful aspects of their personalities to bear.

Feb 13th
Reply

Kamilla Ganglani Lavoie

good podcast but if you're looking for a podcast that has an ending this one's not for you

Sep 8th
Reply

C B

What a solid podcast. Wish it was easy to find more of the good stuff like this.

Sep 8th
Reply

C B

State's attorney people just whipping their polygraph machine around... Doesn't that make them seem really amateur? They're just trying to see who they can bully a confession out of, true or not.

Sep 7th
Reply
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