DiscoverThe Cobain 50
The Cobain 50
Claim Ownership

The Cobain 50

Author: KEXP

Subscribed: 32,974Played: 51,900
Share

Description

Kurt Cobain’s influence went beyond just the music he created with Nirvana. He also put the masses on to some of his own favorite artists. One particular document from his journals has been instructive to many fans – his top 50 albums. Each week, The Cobain 50 podcast digs into albums from this famous list and how they may have influenced Cobain and Nirvana. While learning the individual histories of the different albums on the list, we gain new insights into artists on the fringes as well as some of the biggest groups of all time. The podcast takes us through the legacies of acts like Sonic Youth, Pixies, The Breeders, Public Enemy, PJ Harvey, Black Flag, Mazzy Star, The Shaggs, Shonen Knife, and more. Episodes drop weekly starting January 10, 2024.
75 Episodes
Reverse
Explore KEXP Podcasts!

Explore KEXP Podcasts!

2023-10-1909:11

During KEXP’s fall fund drive, discover the variety of music podcasts we produce at KEXP and hear some of our favorite clips from each one. We’re thankful to the thousands of amplifiers who already donate to KEXP, building the foundation for our community of storytelling, and we want you to join them with a one-time donation or a recurring gift! 50 Years of Hip-Hop: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/50-years-of-hip-hop/ El Sonido: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/el-sonido/ Fresh off the Spaceship: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/fresh-off-the-spaceship/ Live on KEXP: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/live-on-kexp/ Sound and Vision: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/sound-vision/ Song of the Day: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/song-of-the-day/ KEXP Podcasts on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@kexppodcasts Donate today: kexp.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
DJ Kool Herc and his sister Cindy threw a party in the Bronx on August 11, 1973. That party is widely considered to be the birthplace of hip-hop — 50 years ago. The worldwide influence of hip-hop is unmistakable, and we’re giving it a proper tribute. Every week starting February 1, KEXP’s editorial team and DJs are bringing you personal reflections, iconic tracks and albums, and conversations about how it all began. Introducing: 50 Years of Hip-Hop from listener-powered KEXP. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Larry Mizell Jr. kicks off the series in 1994 with "Stress" by Organized Konfusion. The lyrics convey an epigenetic phenomenon, which many Black people experience to this day.  Written by Larry Mizell Jr. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Martin Douglas revisits 2018 with “Vindaloo” by Armand Hammer. ELUCID and billy woods approach rap from two very different creative workflows—and that actually works in their favor to create their own unique flavor. Written by Martin Douglas. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Gabriel Teodros revisits 1987 with “Paid in Full” by Eric B. and Rakim, whose style of rhyming left an unmistakable mark on the rhythm and flow of rap that came after them.  Written by Gabriel Teodros. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Dusty Henry revisits 2002 with the track “Work It” by Missy Elliott. That song helped define the turn of the millennium, and Missy’s career paved the way for a new generation of artists, including KEXP's very own Stas THEE Boss.  Written by Dusty Henry. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Special thanks to Stas THEE Boss. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
To kick off the series, host Larry Mizell Jr sits down with KEXP DJs Reverend Dollars, Vitamin D, and Gabriel Teodros to discuss the idea of hip-hop being born on one particular day. They talk about the broader origins and inspirations of hip-hop as an art form.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Larry Mizell Jr. revisits 1975 with the track “Let’s Take It to the Stage” by Funkadelic, which featured rap before “Rapper’s Delight.” He'll also give a lesson in etymology that you won’t soon forget. Written by Larry Mizell Jr. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Dusty Henry revisits 1977 when Grand Wizzard Theodore debuted a revolutionary DJing technique: scratching. He quite literally stumbled into it when he was just 12 years old.  Written by Dusty Henry. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour. Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Larry Mizell Jr. talks about the art of DJing with fellow KEXP DJs Supreme La Rock and Vitamin D, along with hip-hop scholar Dr. Daudi Abe, DJ Lady Love, and a special appearance from the man who invented scratching, Grand Wizzard Theodore. After he tells the history of how he invented scratching and the needle drop, the panelists share some of their favorite scratch DJs past and present.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Roddy Nikpour revisits 2010 with the track "Zodiac Shit" by Flying Lotus. His short yet spastic instrumentals double down on experimentation with electronic sounds, which defined the sonic brand of the TV network Adult Swim.  Written and produced by Roddy Nikpour.  Edited by Emily Fox. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Eva Walker speaks with Vin Rock of Naughty by Nature about the legacy of their track “Hip Hop Hooray.”  Edited and produced by Emily Fox.  Mastered by Roddy Nikpour.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Martin Douglas revisits 2006 with the track “Mr. Me Too” by The Clipse. The Neptunes saved their weirdest compositions for a couple of longtime collaborators from their home state of Virginia. Written by Martin Douglas. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop  Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Become our newest amplifier today at kexp.org/50hiphop.  This week is KEXP's Spring Drive. As a public radio station and arts organization, we depend on listener support to continue experimenting with storytelling that's varied, voracious, and vulnerable. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Dusty Henry revisits 2000 with a look at the legendary Soulquarian collective. They showed the power of real collaboration and letting inspiration light the way.  Written by Dusty Henry. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop  Read the full transcript on KEXP.orgSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Roddy Nikpour revisits 1986 with the track “No Sleep Till Brooklyn” from the Beastie Boys’ debut album, Licensed to Ill. A couple of young white guys from New York entered the growing hip-hop scene with two signature elements: quick rhymes shared between the MCs and beats that paved the way for rap rock.  Written and produced by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Dusty Henry revisits 2012 with the track “Oldie” by Odd Future. The posse cut led to the rise of one of the most influential groups of the last decade.  Written by Dusty Henry. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Martin Douglas revisits 2001 to unpack the legendary rivalry between Jay-Z and Nas, a story that starts with an empty throne for the king of New York hip-hop.  Written by Martin Douglas. Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Jasmine Albertson revisits 2016 with the track “Caroline” by Aminé. This rapper from Portland helped provide the soundtrack for a somber transition in U.S. politics.  Written by Jasmine Albertson.  Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Listen to a conversation with Aminé on KEXP’s Sound & Vision podcast: https://www.kexp.org/podcasts/sound-vision/2020/8/27/amines-love-hate-relationship-portland-and-its-backdoor-racism/  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Rachel Stevens takes us back to 2021 with the track “Industry Baby” by Lil Nas X. His debut sparked controversy, which led to a loud and proud declaration of his Blackness and queer identity within the rap community.  Written by Rachel Stevens.  Audio production by Roddy Nikpour.  Support the podcast: kexp.org/50hiphop See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
loading
Comments (5)

Maedeh Chaeechiyan

lAykfm

Apr 17th
Reply

dan Boyle

Cobain was an idiot. sandinista was meant to be a punk album. Cobain wS an absolute idiot. sandanista was a clash limits albulm.

Apr 14th
Reply

HC Art

the timing of this podcast was crazy... Palestina Livre! 🇵🇸

Jan 16th
Reply

Dave Throop

I just looked at this while browsing, anyway it's supposed to be Cobain's influences yet there are groups and songs far after his death in full episodes?

Jan 11th
Reply (1)
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store