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The Current

Author: CBC Radio

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CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.
3780 Episodes
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Thirteen provincial and territorial premiers have urged the federal government to tighten up Canada's bail system — a call echoed by police associations across the country. Matt Galloway talks to John Cerasuolo, president and CEO of the Ontario Provincial Police Association; Anne-Marie McElroy, a criminal defence attorney in Ottawa; and John Rudin, program director of Aboriginal Legal Services in Toronto.
Clara Ford, a Black woman, was accused of murdering Frank Westwood, the son of a wealthy Toronto family, in 1894. She defended herself in court — and won. Carolyn Whitzman tells the story of race and justice in her new book, Clara at the Door with a Revolver: The Scandalous Black Suspect, the Exemplary White Son, and the Murder That Shocked Toronto.
A CBC investigation shows that Canada is spending millions to protect amateur athletes from abuse — but those resources aren't reaching local sports groups. We talk to CBC reporter Jamie Strashin; and Paul Sir, executive director of the Alberta Basketball Association.
New research shows that 6.5 million Canadians don’t have a family doctor. It also explores what “trade-offs” people might accept for better access. We discuss the data with Dr. Tara Kiran, a family physician at St. Michael's Hospital, and the Fidani Chair in Improvement and Innovation at the University of Toronto.
Longtime CBC radio producer Michael Finlay died Tuesday, after a random assault in Toronto. Some of his former colleagues shared their memories of him.
We talk to the UN's High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi about the war in Ukraine, the question of talking to the Taliban, and how political polarization has made his job and the lives of refugees harder.
A new investigation by Radio-Canada’s Enquête, in partnership with CBC’s The Fifth Estate, explores allegations that Quebec billionaire Robert G. Miller paid minors for sexual favours — allegations that Miller denies. We talk to Enquête’s Brigitte Noël.
A House of Commons committee is probing the federal government’s decisions to grant multimillion-dollar contracts to the consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Matt Galloway talks to Amanda Clarke, an associate professor of public administration at Carleton University; and Michael Forsythe, an investigative reporter with the New York Times and co-author of When Mckinsey Comes to Town: The Hidden Influence of the World's Most Powerful Consulting Firm.
New voluntary guidelines for long-term care homes were published on Tuesday, but some experts warn that they won’t make life better for residents unless they’re adopted in full. Matt Galloway talks to Janice Keefe, a member of the Health Standards Organization, which published the guidelines; and Mary Oko, former chair of the family council at Copernicus Lodge, a long-term care home in Toronto.
We talk to three energy workers in Alberta about what a “just transition” means to them — and what they think their jobs could look like in a net-zero future: Chad Miller, a pipeline facilities consultant and founder of the Facebook group Oilfield Dads; Ken Wallace, a geologist who recently returned to the oil and gas industry; and Amanda Hall, a geophysicist who left the industry to create her own lithium company, Summit Nanotech.
The U.S. is building a program to privately sponsor refugees, modelled on the one Canada created in the 1970s. We discuss the new program — and what needs to be done to strengthen our own sponsorships — with Mark Hetfield, president and CEO of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society in Silver Spring, Md.; Brian Dyck, the national migration and resettlement program co-ordinator for Mennonite Central Committee Canada; and Ratna Omidvar, an independent senator for Ontario.
The House of Commons is back after a six-week break. We discuss what lies ahead with CBC’s chief political correspondent Rosemary Barton; Globe and Mail reporter Carrie Tait; and National Post parliamentary reporter Catherine Lévesque.
Yazidi communities in northern Iraq faced a genocidal campaign at the hands of ISIS almost a decade ago. Now, Yazidi refugees in Canada are dismayed at the prospect of Canadians suspected of ISIS membership being repatriated from detention camps in Syria. Matt Galloway talks to Jamileh Naso, president of the Canadian Yazidi Association; and Mubin Shaikh, a professor of public safety at Seneca College and a former undercover operative for CSIS and the RCMP.
Russian President Vladimir Putin's biggest critic, Alexei Navalny, remains in prison, facing years behind bars and deteriorating health. We talk to Washington Post reporter Catherine Belton about concerns for his well-being; and listen back to an April 2022 conversation with Daniel Roher, Canadian director of the Oscar-nominated documentary Navalny.
Great strides have been made in the battle against HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, but there are fears that one group is being left behind: children. We talk to Stephanie Nolen, a global health reporter with The New York Times; and Dr. Judith Kose, director for pediatric and adolescent services with the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation.
Protests erupted in the U.S. after the release of video showing Memphis police beating Tyre Nichols, who died three days later. Matt Galloway talks to vice-chair of the Memphis City Council JB Smiley Jr.; and Ricky L. Jones, a professor and chair of the University of Louisville's Department of Pan-African Studies.
Big tech companies have laid off thousands of workers in recent weeks, after a pandemic hiring boom. We talk to Erika Weber, who was recently laid off as a project manager with Shopify; technology reporter Shruti Shekar; and Daniel Tsai, a lecturer on technology and business at University of Toronto and Toronto Metropolitan University.
Toronto commuters are on edge after a recent spate of violent attacks on public transit. Matt Galloway talks to the Toronto Star’s transportation reporter Lex Harvey; and John Di Nino, national president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Canada.
The federal government is advancing a motion to ban cosmetic testing on animals. We talk to Camille Labchuk, executive director of the organization Animal Justice, which advocates for legal protections for animals; Charu Chandrasekera, executive director of the Canadian Centre for Alternatives to Animal Methods; and Michael Brunt, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Guelph’s Ontario Veterinary College.
Love, Janessa is a new true crime podcast seeking to find the woman whose image has been used as bait in countless catfishings around the world. We talk to producer Katrina Onstad and host Hannah Ajala.
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Comments (85)

David Schaefer

BS hahaha 😆 west jet is a bs artist. go ahead cbc, let him blow smoke up everyone's ass.

Jan 14th
Reply

Ali Moghaddam

please help Iranian people. we are being killed easily. help us 😭💔

Sep 23rd
Reply

Dennis Mayer

The questions asked in this interview are annoying. You soften her up with questions about the challenges women face to get to the top level, then you grill her about whether she feels bad about what she has been selling or that she makes 31MM vs a minimum wager??? What do you want from her? Who do you think you're talking to, some environmental, health and equity advocate? She's a capitalist, a successful one, and she did her job well. She wasn't being paid to change the world at PepsiCo, but she did make some improvements. Move on - annoying.

Aug 21st
Reply

km

Read "The War on Normal People" by Andrew Yang. and, #HumanityFirst

Feb 13th
Reply

km

"everyone's replaceable right?" The psychopathy of our modern Western culture runs deep.

Feb 13th
Reply

Eric Lauzon

So dissapointed to hear our Polticians lie like this. Prtoesters have been nice and peaceful and thats from someone who lives downtown Ottawa

Feb 9th
Reply

Ted treller

A very naive appreciation for issues and the interpretation of those issues. My goodness while I appreciate the persistence of CBC to visit the area but an absolute misunderstanding of the history and realities of Eastern Ukraine.

Jan 23rd
Reply

C W

Sweet ending.

Nov 29th
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km

This is a horrifically whiny interview.

Nov 16th
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km

YouTube "Roger Hallam" and "Facing Future". It gets worse.

Oct 11th
Reply

Midnight Rambler

no it's a tragic event. but the left wants to make every tragic event into Martyr

Oct 7th
Reply

km

Things aren't looking good... YouTube "Roger Hallam"

Sep 21st
Reply

Midnight Rambler

this guy loved toxicity during the trump years. but under Biden we need to heal..🤣😆

Sep 7th
Reply

km

The economists here continue to normalize psychopathy. Current economic thinking is an absolute joke. YOU HAVE NOTHING if you don't have a liveable climate you god damned fools. You CONTINUE to eat your young ITS SICK!!!!! $'s/ton Oh Booooo-hooooo. Go f*ck yourselves. You've ALREADY f*cked the rest of Humanity... and most of life on Earth for that matter!!!

Aug 30th
Reply

km

Let's be very clear: we *remain* in a pandemic because of anti-vaxers and the hesitant. An election now is incredibly important. Let's hear what the people want to do next.

Aug 18th
Reply

km

Where's all the money go?? The Early Childhood Educators are paid nowhere near enough. Business owners???

Aug 13th
Reply

Les Anderson

The female nurse has to hide her identity but the male nurse doesn't; not surprised.

Jul 27th
Reply

km

Albertans want to cut nurse salaries and benefits now?? Is this province completely insane??

Jul 26th
Reply

Vivian Evans

This has been know for decade.

Jul 24th
Reply

km

Dark times ahead (?)

Jun 15th
Reply
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