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The Indicator from Planet Money

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A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Try Planet Money+! a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. You'll also get access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions. sign up at plus.npr.org/planetmoney
1386 Episodes
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You may have heard some big news this past weekend: Joe Biden dropped out of the presidential election. This leaves Kamala Harris as the favorite to be the Democratic nominee. On today's show, We imagine what can be, and we're unburdened by what has been: Kamala Harris' economics, delegate math in deciding the nominee and ... can Kamala Harris use Joe Biden's campaign money?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
It's Indicators of the Week! We cover the numbers in the news that you should know about. This week, we cover climbing corporate bankruptcies, J.D. Vance's potential to bring the dollar down, and the NBA's new super serious salary cap.Related episodes:The Science of HoopsWhy Ecuador Uses The Dollar?For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Supreme Court's decision to quash Chevron deference means countless agency regulations are now more vulnerable to being challenged and struck down. Think the Environmental Protection Agency's plan to boost electric vehicle sales, discrimination protections against transgender people, and rules that expand eligibility for overtime. Yesterday, we explained the history that led to this moment. Today, we look at the how the decision will play into a wave of regulatory lawsuits.Related episodes:The conservative roots behind the Chevron doctrine (Apple / Spotify) Could SCOTUS outlaw wealth taxes (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
When the Supreme Court decided Chevron U.S.A., Inc v. Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc. 40 years ago, it didn't turn many heads. But eventually, it became the most widely cited case in all of administrative law. It set a legal precedent to give federal agencies the benefit of the doubt when the law is ambiguous, known as Chevron deference. Now, a recent Supreme Court decision has set in motion another tectonic shift, effectively ending that precedent. Today, we dig into what Chevron deference is and how it actually came about. Then tomorrow we'll continue our focus on this significant change by looking at the potential fallout. Related episodes: A Supreme Court case that could reshape social media (Apple / Spotify) Could SCOTUS outlaw wealth taxes (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The Digital Markets Act is a new piece of European legislation aimed at making markets in the digital sector "fairer and more contestable." It's essentially antitrust regulation—rules to ensure that no one company or group of companies makes an area of business uncompetitive. And these rules are making some big companies sweat, not because they're afraid of monetary penalties, but because they could have an effect on antitrust regulations around the world.Today on the show, we examine the differences between how the EU and the United States handle antitrust and what the Digital Markets Act could mean for big tech's regulatory future. Related episodes:EU leads the way on controlling big tech For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
If you regularly listen to The Indicator, you know China's economy is not doing great. Over the last few years, indicators like unemployment and local debt are up, and consumption and property sales are down. There is one big indicator that's been a bellwether for China's economy ... booze. One specific kind: Baijiu. In today's episode, a quick history on baijiu and how the liquor is a potent symbol for consumer confidence in China. Related Episodes: China's weakening economy in two Indicators The Beigie Awards: China Edition For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
On Indicators of the Week, we cover the numbers in the news that you should know about. This week, we cover an encouraging trend for global wealth, closing Mexico's tariff loophole and the European nation bucking the trend of shorter work weeks. Related episodes:Why tariffs are SO back (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
There are currently just under 65,000 migrants in New York City's shelter system, stretching the city's outworn social service systems. Today on the show, we follow one asylum seeker's journey from Venezuela to New York and explore why the process is lengthy and complicated. Related episodes: Is the 'border crisis' actually a labor market crisis? (Apple / Spotify) 'Welcome to the USA! Now get to work.' (Apple / Spotify) The migrant match game (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Voters have a bleak outlook on the economy right now, and many are pointing the finger at President Biden. At the same time, many voters have a rosy view of the economy when Donald Trump was president. But how much credit or blame should a president get for the economy? And how do partisan politics play into our perception of the economy's performance? Related episodes:Common economic myths, debunked (Apple / Spotify) Not too hot, not too cold: A 'Goldilocks' jobs report (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Children of U.S. military families, a.k.a. brats, are known for their adaptability when relocating to new neighborhoods and schools every few years. This migratory population became the basis for brand new research on how the neighborhood you grew up in affects your economic success later in life. Today on the show, how a place influences your financial destiny. Related episodes: Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse (Apple / Spotify) The secret to upward mobility: Friends For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Back in 2021, the meme stock frenzy was at its peak: Roaring Kitty AKA Keith Gill, and young day traders gleefully upended financial markets. Roaring Kitty disappeared for a bit before returning just a couple months ago. His disciples that followed him into the markets, however, never left. That's according to Nathaniel Popper in his new book, The Trolls of Wall Street: How the Outcasts and Insurgents are Hacking the Markets. Today on the show, why Nathaniel believes these day traders are here to stay and where they're putting their money now. Related Episodes: GameStop and the Short Squeeze The tower of Nvidia For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
U.S. job growth cooled this month. But one job is hot to the touch: AI prompt engineer. The role can command a six figure salary, but ... what is it? Today, we speak to an AI prompt engineer to figure out what they actually do and how long the job could remain hot. Related: AI creates, transforms and destroys ... jobs (Apple / Spotify) If AI is so good, why are there still so many jobs for translators? Applying for a job? Make sure your resume is AI-Friendly (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Last week, Vladimir Putin vowed to make new nuclear weapons and consider placing them close to NATO countries. Meanwhile, here in the US, the government boosted its nuclear weapon spending by 18% between 2022 and 2023. The world is closer to nuclear war than it's been in at least forty years. Today on the show: The game theory of nuclear war. When can mathematical models help us, and when can they lead us astray ... even to the brink of destruction? Guest Kelly Clancy's book is Playing With Reality: How Games Have Shaped Our World. Related Episodes: How to get Russia to pay Ukraine Congressional game theoryFor sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Europe is expecting a wave of victories from far-right candidates in upcoming national elections. Voters are showing they're worried about income inequality, immigration and the effects of participating in a global economy. Today, we take a look at what the swing to the right means for Europe's economy and the European stance on globalization.Related Episodes:Can Europe fund its defense ambitions (Apple / Spotify) Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines (Apple / Spotify) How vikings launched globalization 1.0 For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
It's been two years since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the right to an abortion, triggering a parade of restrictions and bans in conservative-led states. Today on the show, how the medical labor force is changing post-Roe and why graduating medical students, from OB-GYNs to pediatricians, are avoiding training in states with abortion bans. Related listening: What's the cure for America's doctor shortage? KFF: Medical Residents Are Increasingly Avoiding Abortion Ban States For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Indicators of the Week is BACK! This week we're doing something just a little bit different. You see, it's the same 'ol Indicators of the Week you're used to, but as a nod to last night's presidential debate, this time, it's debate style. On today's episode, your candidates argue over who has the best Indicator of the Week: the links discovered between health care prices and layoffs, stress-tested banks, and ... cow burps? Related Episodes: Time to make banks more stressed? The Cows Are Taking All The Land For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For years, rich nations have sent money to lower-income countries to help deal with the impacts of climate change. But it turns out, these wealthy nations are finding creative ways to funnel some of that financing back into their own economies. Today, we look at how the climate crisis is reviving a debate over how money should flow from rich to less-rich nations.Related:A program meant to help developing nations fight climate change is funneling billions of dollars back to rich countriesA countdown to climate action (Apple / Spotify) Gambling, literally, on climate change (Apple / Spotify) Blue bonds: A market solution to the climate crisis? (Apple / Spotify) Why a debt tsunami is coming for the global economy (Apple / Spotify) For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The last major overhaul of the tax code was in 2017, when Republicans passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Much of that is set to expire next year, and that means a big debate over tax policy is looming. Voters this fall won't just be voting for a president—they'll essentially decide who pays for the government and how much for years to come. Today on the show, we explain the battle lines forming in this tax code throwdown.Related Episodes:The Good, The Bad and The Tax CutsHappy Birthday, Tax Cuts!For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
A few years ago, bike enthusiast Bryan Hance got a tip. A whole bunch of expensive bikes that were stolen in the Bay Area had suddenly turned up ... for sale on a Facebook page in Mexico. The revelation started Bryan down a years-long investigation where he would uncover an intricate, large-scale criminal operation out of Jalisco, Mexico. In today's episode, we talk to freelance reporter Christopher Solomon who wrote about Hance's journey in WIRED Magazine. Related episodes: Is retail theft getting worse? (Apple / Spotify) The economics of stealing bikes For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
The tower of NVIDIA

The tower of NVIDIA

2024-06-2411:413

For a moment last week, semiconductor chip designer NVIDIA eclipsed Microsoft to become the world's most valuable company. How did it get there? Today on the show, David Rosenthal, one half of the tech podcast Acquired, explains how NVIDIA's founder Jensen Huang laid the groundwork for the company's meteoric rise, and why there may be obstacles ahead. Related episodes:The life and death spirals of social media networks (Apple / Spotify) The semiconductor founding father For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Music by Drop Electric. Find us: TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Newsletter.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
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Comments (209)

TH3N0RTHSID3

Tariffs? Embargos? COVID checks?

Jul 11th
Reply

Patrick Neal

Liberal NPR does not once say the word "illegal" in their entire discussion.

Jun 12th
Reply

Gil Gurevich

It wasn't a civil war! Arabs attacked the jews and didn't agree to the 2 states solutions That was a really biased episode by my opinion

Jun 7th
Reply

Alex McNaughton

did they speed up the audio? it sounds off

Apr 7th
Reply

jeff stude

"older white Republican" mmmmm ok then

Mar 28th
Reply

G

I think we should not give the government more Social Security money simply because they mishandled the money we already gave them. Putting more money in the hands of those who will waste it will not solve the problem, and me paying 7.65% going up to 9.65% isn't fair to me and limits my investing power. I believe people can invest their money better than the govt can.

Mar 21st
Reply

steve

.

Mar 12th
Reply

steve

Shareholder Vote Exchange vote buying

Mar 12th
Reply (1)

Khalid Shamlan

Couple of points. 1. MBS didn't agree to sport washing accusations. He clearly said, if you named as such then it is fine as long as it adds to GDP😁 2. No normalization with Israel. This week announcement is as clear as Neom shores😂. We talk when Un resolutions are implemented based on '67 boarders. Final thought, US politicians push when their accounts are going down. We have seen change of harts when they are seeing benefits in Saudi Arabia. Seems that they haven't yet.

Feb 9th
Reply

Habia Khet

💚WATCH>>ᗪOᗯᑎᒪOᗩᗪ>>LINK>👉https://co.fastmovies.org

Feb 5th
Reply

Alex McNaughton

audio doubles up at around 7:30

Oct 12th
Reply

G

It’s really sad how woke NPR is. I’m highly conservative and I love NPR, but when they say things like they don’t like a song because they’re confused by the “conservative lyrics”…come on guys. These lyrics aren’t complicated. The lyrics voice frustration about high taxes, corrupt politicians, and no one caring about minors (you know, kids). What’s so confusing about that you leftist self-righteous paranoid democrats? The song referred to is Rich Men North of Richmond.

Oct 3rd
Reply

Matevz Groboljsek

Broken audio :(

Sep 17th
Reply

TH3N0RTHSID3

whoops forgot to include Darian's file

Sep 16th
Reply

Alex McNaughton

so bizarre, it's like they only recorded on one mic

Sep 16th
Reply

Aakash Amanat

I absolutely love "The Indicator from Planet Money"! This podcast has been a game-changer for me in terms of understanding complex economic concepts in a fun and engaging way. The hosts have a remarkable talent for breaking down intricate topics into easily digestible segments, which makes economics accessible to a wider audience. https://hubpages.com/@customise-sticker One thing I appreciate is how the show covers a wide range of subjects, from global trade and monetary policy to quirky and unexpected economic phenomena. The diverse range of topics keeps me coming back for more, as there's always something new and interesting to learn. https://www.behance.net/customise-sticker

Aug 21st
Reply

Cathy Muste

next time pick me for a guest!

Jul 12th
Reply

Alex McNaughton

one of the best episodes! great questions!

Jul 9th
Reply

Sara Peracca

how about a piece about public banks

Jul 2nd
Reply

Michele S

Anyone with access to their meter can buy a device to monitor their water usage. I got a Flume a couple years ago and it reported a leak shortly after it started.

Jun 16th
Reply