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The Intelligence from The Economist

Author: The Economist

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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

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1049 Episodes
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The country remains riven by unrest since the “self-coup” and subsequent arrest of its president in December; only an early election might bring a return to calm. Our correspondent goes shopping to discover the spending habits of Generation Z and millennials. And examining the work of Tom Lehrer, a mathematician who was an unlikely midwife at the birth of modern satire.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The Adani Group, one of India’s biggest conglomerates, has come under fire from a tiny American research firm. A successful secondary share sale amid a rout in the markets leaves many questions—and proves revealing about India Inc. Our correspondent explains why Mexico is so well-placed to navigate the electric-vehicle transition. And the unlikely rise of MAGA rap artists.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Fixing the complex, creaking pension system remains central to President Emmanuel Macron’s agenda of reforms. But leaving it alone is central to French identity—so workers are striking, again, in huge numbers. Our correspondent lays out why 2023’s first earnings season is so gloomy. And America is providing more legal protections for polyamorous “throuples”.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The response to the death of the 29-year-old has differed from that of previous cases of police killings; we ask what the tragedy indicates about how America deals with police violence. Our correspondent says a lawmaker’s murder in Afghanistan highlights the misery of women under the Taliban. And why a decades-old model of animal and human learning is under fire. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
South Africa’s infrastructure—its ports, railways and power grid—are struggling and poorly managed. Ordinary South Africans are increasingly fed up. We profile Russia’s new military commander in Ukraine. And our obituaries editor remembers one of Britain’s finest rural writers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in America’s endless culture wars.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Feeling un-Wellington

Feeling un-Wellington

2023-01-2327:172

Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The global elite’s annual Alpine jamboree may have lost some of its convening power, our editor-in-chief says, but the many encounters it enables still have enormous value. Our correspondent considers what the closing of Noma, a legendary Danish restaurant, means for the world of fine dining. And remembering Adolfo Kaminsky, whose expertly forged documents saved thousands of Jews’ lives. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has dismantled the country’s institutions. As an election looms we ask what democratic guardrails remain, and examine the wider risks if those go, too. “Non-compete” clauses designed to protect trade secrets when employees depart are being abused—and trustbusters are going after them. And Ryuichi Sakamoto, a famed Japanese composer, reckons with mortality in his latest release.Music from “12” courtesy of Milan Records.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
For nearly 11 months Western powers have resisted providing tanks to Ukraine, fearing an unpredictable Russian escalation. What happens now that red line has rightly been crossed? Bankruptcy proceedings simply are not built to untangle the mess left behind by the implosion of FTX, a spectacularly failed crypto firm. And what California’s deadly floods reveal about its climate future. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Through years of Syria’s messy civil war, Turkey has been a foe. As the conflict slowly fades, the countries have a mutual interest in rapprochement. Can they find common ground? Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s return as Brazil’s president renews a mission close to his heart: ameliorating the country’s widespread hunger. And why atheism is still taboo for America’s lawmakers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A drip-feed of discoveries of classified material in Joe Biden’s home and offices—and the president’s botched messaging around them—are a gift to Republicans and to Donald Trump, who is under investigation for similar infractions. Our correspondent learns that many Ukrainian soldiers are freezing their sperm before heading to battle. And the fight about hunting in France is no small-boar matter.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Countries across the world are turning inward, embracing protectionism, subsidies and export controls. This threatens the global order that has lifted hundreds of millions out of poverty, and risks economic conflict. Ethiopia’s newfound peace looks fragile and uncertain. And Mexico’s ballads that critics claim glorify criminality, but fans argue celebrate loyalty, ingenuity and hard work.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Iran’s protests may have gone quiet for the moment, but that does not mean they’ve been defeated. Beneath a calmer surface, Iranians are seething and biding their time. India’s pharma sector is huge, but has long been dogged by concerns about quality control. And we reveal last year’s most newsworthy subject.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Britain’s National Health Service is in crisis. Wait times are rising, nurses and paramedics are striking, and doctors are overworked—leading to hundreds of excess deaths each week. We visit the front line: a stretched GP’s surgery in Wales. We ask why Germany and Poland love to hate each other. And what America’s army is doing to slim down its overweight recruits.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Russian troops have turned Bakhmut, in eastern Ukraine, into a charnel house—and a proving ground for its mercenary army. The booming North Sea region could reshape Europe’s economy. And how women across the Middle East are taking their sexuality into their own hands. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
In a scene reminiscent of the US Capitol riot two years ago, supporters of Brazil’s defeated president rampaged through government buildings yesterday. Our Brazil correspondent surveys the damage. We explain why Tesla’s share price has plummeted, and why an Italian film has been remade in more than 20 countries in the past six years. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Israel’s new government is its most right-wing ever—but, in a break from the past, that may not derail deepening relations with neighbouring Arab countries. Thousands of Africans are killed each year after being accused of witchcraft—in many cases for more nefarious reasons than mere superstition. And the “cicerones” helping Americans navigate a vast and growing craft-beer scene.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Comments (105)

Delphine Aphecetche

you rightly explain the issue of the funding of retirement allowances in France and then present Macron's reform as a needed solution and modernization effort without challenging its potential impact and efficency. - unemployement of seniors is an issue already , especially for women, it's a huge blind spot of the reform that you did not even mention - funding of retirements can be reviewed in other ways as the current system is bankrupted. why not extending a partial capitalization funding as it has been piloted for years in part of the public sector in France? you could have investigated Then you rather go for the catchy numbers of the 20 years of retirement due to the high life expectancy. have you doble check that number with the prisma of social class? there are huge variations there. Also how many of those 20 years are in good health? again statistics show than only 1/3 I expect more from the economist , what a disappointing episode

Feb 2nd
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Jane Bromley

Where do you get the statistic that 80% of Russians don't want the Ukrainian war from? It doesn't match any of the reputable sources I can find. and when members of the elite you mention are being killed, what makes you think that the secret service would allow anyone to get even close to that? Thanks

Nov 5th
Reply

INFJayo

These terrible puns in the ep titles make you seem less serious journalists, more ridiculous twitter people.

Sep 5th
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Al McCoy

I have to have some outlet to say that from everything I have ever heard about Ukraine... I have more patriotism for their country, people, and leadership than that of my own country. Watching the same core of evil that rots my own country too, try to take down one of the few examples of strength, in body, in moral integrity, calls me to action in a magnetically powerful force.

Jun 25th
Reply

James Knight

things are not going well for sexual minorities in Amerika, either, nor for any minority except the psychopaths.

Jun 23rd
Reply

Gerald Williams

Games have had great stories for decades. This piece feels really dated...

May 27th
Reply

Esaruddin Esar

👍

May 26th
Reply

Lázaro Mira

literally you are using the shutting to campaign in favor of democrats 🤢

May 25th
Reply

Ciara Alvarado

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Apr 3rd
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Ryan McKinless

How can a serious outlet run with puns like this, especially in wartime?

Mar 23rd
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Patricia Nascu

I found your report on the lady who can detect Parkinson by smell very intriguing. But instead of using an AI machine to reproduce her diagnosis skills, wouldn't it be so much more accurate to train dogs?

Mar 13th
Reply

Kunal

I am so used to listening to Jason Palmer. Having two hosts is going to take some getting used to 😶

Mar 13th
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Anthony Vella

America = continent United States of America = country stop calling the country "america"

Mar 2nd
Reply

Karol Mileszko

I used to believe The Economist to be an example of good unbiased journalism. When I now read or listen to their coverage on covid situation I'm disappointed to see biased picks of opinions and exclusively backing the main-stream narrative. The current article is no exception: nearly half of German and Austrian population resisting attempts to forced medication was dismissed without giving any consideration to their arguments. No serious health or legal analysis, no historical considerations (Nuremberg Code or Human Rights chapter on bodily integrity, anyone?). Only the two-year-old big pharma propaganda. Disappointing.

Jan 19th
Reply

Midnight Rambler

it's called a democracy

Sep 10th
Reply

Trevor Chinembiri

15:55 In 1509, an increasingly uncomfortable Michelangelo described the physical strain of the Sistine Chapel project to his friend Giovanni da Pistoia. “I’ve already grown a goiter from this torture,” he wrote in a poem that was surely somewhat tongue-in-cheek. He went on to complain that his “stomach’s squashed under my chin,” that his “face makes a fine floor for droppings,” that his “skin hangs loose below me” and that his “spine’s all knotted from folding myself over.” He ended with an affirmation that he shouldn’t have changed his day job: “I am not in the right place—I am not a painter.”

Jul 8th
Reply

Anita Arpadarehi

it was informative episode thank you very much

Jun 15th
Reply

Iain Frame

Getting rid of law enforcement in high crime areas? What could possibly go wrong?

Jun 8th
Reply

Christopher Armstrong

1st half: interesting. 2nd half: waah waah cry me a river PC bullsh%t Can we please have more female guests / journalists who talk about something other than 'oppression'

Apr 5th
Reply

andrea casalotti

Warning : Fucking Facebook ads

Mar 26th
Reply
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