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The Intelligence from The Economist

Author: The Economist

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Get a daily burst of illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents. Our reporters dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be. A unique perspective on the issues and events shaping your world.


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1366 Episodes
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Police clashes with protesters at Columbia University have spilled over into other institutions, raising the question of how to protect free speech on campuses. Given America’s history with students’ anti-war protests going awry, should politicians be worried? Why most British voters now think Brexit was a mistake (we did warn you!) (08:53) And, could new tech protect whales from speeding ships (15:45)?Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The companies behind this wonder of tech are facing allegations of using copyrighted material to build their large language models (LLMs). But will the courts consider it fair use? Why ex-inmates are so likely to die just after they leave prison (10:15). And, the case for booing in sports (16:13). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
At a time when Russia has been making significant gains, an allocated $61bn of aid for Ukraine will be felt on the battlefield almost instantly. Will it help turn the course of the war? In a world of endless supply chain disruptions, how can businesses shore up against the costs (11:26)? And the appeal of two-month-old stew (18:37).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
A missile has reportedly struck a site in the Islamic Republic. If this is retaliation for Iran’s most recent attacks, then it is a muted response. But is there still a risk of escalation? As India’s election kicks off, a look into why the opposition is likely to have a poor showing (09:07). And, a tribute to the first foreign-born grand champion of sumo (19:15).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Governments particularly in the rich world are struggling to get young people in uniform. Will some form of conscription become necessary? In America, how remote working husbands may be liberating their wives (10:19). And, the generational hunting prowess of the killer whale (16:53).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
All over the world, young men are identifying more with the political right, even as women drift more to the left. What is behind the gulf, and how to close it? The seeming drop in crime in Naples is not because the notorious mafia activity has disappeared—it has evolved (10:11). And exploring the history and the present of the flat white (17:08).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The case for assisted dying is essentially one of individual freedom—and plenty of Britons support a change in the law to permit it. Japan’s Noto peninsula is still reeling from a New Year’s Day earthquake. It could well have been worse, but geography and demography may ultimately limit improvements to earthquake preparedness (10:46). And the pros and cons of corporate uniforms (18:49).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
For the first time Iran launched a huge attack on Israel from its own territory, though the effort largely failed. Israel’s response could easily lead to regional war; what is it likely to be? The first of the four criminal trials that Donald Trump faces will get under way today. It is by some margin the tawdriest (11:46). And celebrating the 150th anniversary of Impressionism (20:02).   Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
We have combined polling data to make a detailed portrait of the American electorate. Have a tinker with our interactive model: plug in their age, sex, religion, and more, and let us estimate how your hypothetical voter will vote in the presidential election. Allegations of extortion at the Rafah crossing out of Gaza (09:57). And, a tribute to an heiress-turned-IRA bombmaker (20:17).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Since the invasion began, Ukraine's second city has suffered a third of all aerial attacks. The latest one has been especially gruelling. A census of Mexico’s missing people is likely underestimating the scale of the problem. Is the president deliberately trying to minimise its scale (11:08)? And, why those with the least to spend on lottery tickets are most likely to try their luck (19:20). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The leaders of both countries will meet for dinner at the White House tonight. In light of Asia’s changing geopolitics, defence will certainly be high up on the agenda. Somali pirates are wreaking havoc in the Indian Ocean again. What explains their resurgence (8:34)? And, have a listen to what AI can do with music (13:29). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
In Russia inflation is under control, wages are on the up and supposedly tough sanctions have been successfully skirted. Why is the pariah economy proving so resilient? Despite the nasty rhetoric of many of its politicians, Britain has turned out to be quite good at assimilating immigrants (09:29). And how lorries can be electrified faster (19:11).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.  Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The 1994 slaughter of hundreds of thousands of minority Tutsis completely reshaped the country. It also produced Africa’s most polarising leader, whose outsized power and regional influence is proving ever more divisive. How a shadow economy of gangs and clans is running Gaza (11:45). And a total solar eclipse is coming to America (20:01).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Podcast transcripts are available upon request at podcasts@economist.com. We are committed to improving accessibility even further and are exploring new ways to expand our podcast-transcript offering. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Twenty-two years ago, Palestinian politician-turned-revolutionary Marwan Barghouti was convicted of acts of terrorism and sentenced to spend the rest of his life in an Israeli prison. Now, there’s a chance he could be released. Barghouti is at the top of Hamas’s list of prisoners they want exchanged for the hostages they took on October 7th. And Palestinians overwhelmingly want him to lead them. The Economist's Nicolas Pelham asks who is Marwan Barghouti and could he be the man who will lead Palestine?Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
After more than 100 days in office, President Javier Milei has managed some much-needed economic reforms. But the hit to voters’ pockets may limit his popularity, and progress. Sprucing up a peripheral Paris neighbourhood for the Olympics is just part of a plan to transform the city’s geography (9:42). And the astonishing life of the longest-ever user of an iron lung (17:20).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.Podcast transcripts are available upon request at podcasts@economist.com. We are committed to improving accessibility even further and are exploring new ways to expand our podcast-transcript offering. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The game theory was simpler during a cold war between two states armed to the teeth; the nuclear world order has since become far more complex and dangerous. Nvidia is on a tear making the artificial-intelligence community’s favoured chips. What plans, and perils, lie ahead for the firm (10:55)? And why there are ever fewer accountants on the books in America (18:25).Additional audio "As an accountant" courtesy of Rocky Paterra.Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.Podcast transcripts are available upon request at podcasts@economist.com. We are committed to improving accessibility even further and are exploring new ways to expand our podcast-transcript offering. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
India is not the first country to leapfrog from poverty-induced undernourishment to also having an obesity crisis—but a number of factors make that a far chunkier problem than it is elsewhere. A shock local-election result in Turkey suggests the country’s strongman leader may not be so strong (9:48). And China’s solar-panel bonanza upsets the lucrative market for ultra-pure sand (17:43).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.Podcast transcripts are available upon request at podcasts@economist.com. We are committed to improving accessibility even further and are exploring new ways to expand our podcast-transcript offering. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
As yet more aid workers die in Gaza and an airstrike levels an Iranian consulate, pressure on Israel’s Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu mounts. But all that chaos is paradoxically protective. We take an economist’s view on the “superfakes” that are chipping away at the luxury-handbag industry (10:18). And French winemakers face the twin challenges of brewers and abstemious youth (18:37).Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.Podcast transcripts are available upon request at podcasts@economist.com. We are committed to improving accessibility even further and are exploring new ways to expand our podcast-transcript offering. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
There are fears about TikTok, but it’s not the only social media platform that the Chinese state might be using to monitor the rest of the world. That’s especially worrying for those in its diaspora who thought they were free. How monopolies are transforming America’s skiing industry (08:59). And just how much stuff are museums sitting on (15:37)?Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Alexei Navalny was sent to one to die and American journalist Evan Gershkovich is being held in another. Our correspondent reports on the notorious brutality of Russia’s prisons. Without the right policies, undoing years of dependency on oil will take much longer than hoped (11:03). And a tribute to the Israeli luthier who restored violins from the Holocaust (18:53). Listen to what matters most, from global politics and business to science and technology—Subscribe to Economist Podcasts+For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Comments (113)

Kristoffer Nordman

i just listened to the segment about tinnitus in my car. I would like to warn that now 5 min after I still here the noise played that was included to emulate the sound. did you just guve me tinnitus??

Mar 21st
Reply

Dennis Mayer

Good god, this was a painful listen. This is what happens when you get a millennial to write a script and just use Google for story research. AI is going to eat you alive.

Mar 5th
Reply (1)

andrea casalotti

Amazing they are able to talk about Indian subsidies to the airline industry without mentioning climate change implications

Dec 18th
Reply

Henri

living in rural France i know of three boulangerie that opened around me on condition that they wouldn't close the center one. they are "extension" of the one in the center. some people argued that this type of rules might be abusive and wouldn't hold if chalanged but so far it's AMAZING to have both the i want to chat and walk around boulangerie AND the quick drive next to thé "supermarket" (it's rural France, you need quote around supermarket :)

Sep 13th
Reply

ID22588324

What is that?

Aug 20th
Reply

Gabe Logan

so disgusting and partisan for this podcast to use the language by a criminal in its title

Aug 15th
Reply

Chris Knowles

Occidental are investing in more greenwash to justify extending their production of fossil fuels. I'm very surprised the Economist didn't call them out in this interview.

Jun 3rd
Reply

Ralph OFUYO

Good last episode for John

Mar 24th
Reply

Delphine Aphecetche

you rightly explain the issue of the funding of retirement allowances in France and then present Macron's reform as a needed solution and modernization effort without challenging its potential impact and efficency. - unemployement of seniors is an issue already , especially for women, it's a huge blind spot of the reform that you did not even mention - funding of retirements can be reviewed in other ways as the current system is bankrupted. why not extending a partial capitalization funding as it has been piloted for years in part of the public sector in France? you could have investigated Then you rather go for the catchy numbers of the 20 years of retirement due to the high life expectancy. have you doble check that number with the prisma of social class? there are huge variations there. Also how many of those 20 years are in good health? again statistics show than only 1/3 I expect more from the economist , what a disappointing episode

Feb 2nd
Reply

Jane Bromley

Where do you get the statistic that 80% of Russians don't want the Ukrainian war from? It doesn't match any of the reputable sources I can find. and when members of the elite you mention are being killed, what makes you think that the secret service would allow anyone to get even close to that? Thanks

Nov 5th
Reply

INFJayo

These terrible puns in the ep titles make you seem less serious journalists, more ridiculous twitter people.

Sep 5th
Reply

James Knight

things are not going well for sexual minorities in Amerika, either, nor for any minority except the psychopaths.

Jun 23rd
Reply

Gerald Williams

Games have had great stories for decades. This piece feels really dated...

May 27th
Reply

Esaruddin Esar

👍

May 26th
Reply

Lázaro Mira

literally you are using the shutting to campaign in favor of democrats 🤢

May 25th
Reply

Ciara Alvarado

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Apr 3rd
Reply

Ryan McKinless

How can a serious outlet run with puns like this, especially in wartime?

Mar 23rd
Reply

Patricia Nascu

I found your report on the lady who can detect Parkinson by smell very intriguing. But instead of using an AI machine to reproduce her diagnosis skills, wouldn't it be so much more accurate to train dogs?

Mar 13th
Reply

Kunal

I am so used to listening to Jason Palmer. Having two hosts is going to take some getting used to 😶

Mar 13th
Reply

Anthony Vella

America = continent United States of America = country stop calling the country "america"

Mar 2nd
Reply
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