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Sam Bankman-Fried is the founder and ex-CEO of FTX, the crypto exchange that recently filed for bankruptcy. WSJ reporter Alexander Osipovich sat down with him to talk about what happened and how $8 billion of customer money went missing. Further Reading: -FTX Founder Sam Bankman-Fried Says He Can’t Account for Billions Sent to Alameda Further Listening: -The Fall of Crypto’s Golden Boy -How Crypto Giant FTX Suddenly Imploded Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Cerebral was a buzzy Silicon Valley startup that set out to transform mental-health services in the U.S. In just a couple of years, the company attracted thousands of patients, raised hundreds of millions of dollars and partnered with star Olympic gymnast Simone Biles. But some people who worked at Cerebral say that, along the way, the company's focus on growth interfered with patient care. And now, Cerebral is under federal investigation. Cerebral says it provided high-quality care to thousands of patients who might not otherwise have had access. In a new four-part series, WSJ's Rolfe Winkler and Khadeeja Safdar take us inside Cerebral. We'll meet some former staff who are part of Cerebral’s story, and explore the company's origins and explosive growth, as well as the consequences of that growth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Major freight railroads and unions have been locked in a labor dispute for years. But last Friday, President Biden signed a bill passed by Congress forcing a deal onto both parties. We talk to WSJ’s Esther Fung about why a rail strike would have been devastating, and a railroad signalman lays out what the deal means for him. Further Reading: -A Potential Rail Strike Looms. Here’s What to Know.  -Biden Signs Legislation Preventing Railroad Strike  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Former Chinese president Jiang Zemin died this week at 96. As WSJ’s Charles Hutzler explains, Jiang was known for policies that guided China towards a market-oriented economy, but also for being uncompromising on challenges to the Communist Party. Further Reading: -Jiang Zemin, Who Steered China Into New Era, Dies at 96  Further Listening: -China’s Biggest Protests in Decades  -How Xi Jinping’s Dream Slowed China’s Economy  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dr. Anthony Fauci - the U.S. Chief Medical Advisor - is retiring after more than 50 years of government service. We speak to him about the biggest challenges in his career and if he believes Covid is behind us. Further Reading -Anthony Fauci to Step Down After More Than 50 Years of Government Service  Further Listening -Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron and the Covid-19 Stalemate  -Anthony Fauci: Delta Variant Has 'Exposed Our Vulnerability'  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Beyond Meat, the maker of plant-based meat alternatives, has been a darling of the food startup world. In 2019, it had one of the most successful initial public offerings by a major company in more than two decades. But now sales are down, its stock is slumping and its workforce is shrinking, WSJ's Jesse Newman unpacks Beyond's problems. Further Reading: -Beyond Meat’s Very Real Problems: Slumping Sausages, Mounting Losses  -Beyond Meat Reports Weak Sales and Mounting Losses  Further Listening: -Oatly Pioneered Oat Milk. Now It’s Struggling to Keep Up.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
After years of strict Covid restrictions, people are taking to the streets in cities across China. But they’re not just protesting zero-Covid, they’re voicing displeasure with Xi Jinping himself. WSJ’s Brian Spegele gives us an inside view of the protests rocking China. Further Reading: -China’s Surveillance State Pushes Deeper Into Citizens’ Lives  -Much of China Locks Down With No End to Zero Covid in Sight  -Chinese Protests Spread Over Government’s Covid Restrictions  Further Listening: -How Xi Jinping's Dream Slowed China's Economy  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
In recent months, Russia has ramped up its use of drones in its war on Ukraine. As Ukrainian analysts have begun dissecting some of the unmanned aircraft, they’ve uncovered a complex web of suppliers. WSJ’s Ian Talley explains.  Further Reading: -Ukrainian Analysis Identifies Western Supply Chain Behind Iran’s Drones  -Iran Acknowledges Supplying Drones to Russia  Further Listening: -Iran’s Secret System to Avoid Sanctions  -Ukraine Makes a Deal with Wall Street  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Since Elon Musk bought Twitter four weeks ago, thousands of employees have been laid off, fired or decided to leave the company. WSJ's Alexa Corse explains what the company's leaner staff could mean for the platform. Further Reading: -Elon Musk Tells Twitter Staff to Work ‘Long Hours at High Intensity’ or Leave  -Twitter’s Mass Resignations Test Elon Musk’s Management Playbook  -Twitter Lays Off Some Sales Employees After They Committed to Twitter 2.0  Further Listening: -Why Elon Musk’s Twitter Is Losing Advertisers  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Inflation is driving American consumers to pinch pennies, and Walmart is taking note. The retailing giant says its customers are increasingly price-conscious. WSJ's Sarah Nassauer says to keep prices low, Walmart is flexing its muscles with suppliers. Further Reading: -Walmart Sales Rise as Retail Giant Gains Shoppers  -Walmart Is Flexing Its Muscle Again  -Holiday Sales Growth Expected to Slow This Year  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
One of the biggest sports events of the year began yesterday in Qatar, but there have been a lot of bumps along the way. From the abuse of stadium construction workers to a ban on beer – WSJ's Joshua Robinson on the controversies surrounding Qatar’s World Cup. Further Reading: -World Cup Brings Two Million Visitors and an Epic Culture Clash to Qatar  -Qatar Wanted to Host the World Cup. First It Needed a Soccer Team.  Further Listening: -We Came To Win: The Escape  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Millions of Taylor Swift fans tried unsuccessfully to buy advance tickets for her Eras Tour, Swift’s first in five years. And after overwhelming demand throttled Ticketmaster’s website, a public sale of tickets has been called off. WSJ's Anne Steele explains what happened and why Ticketmaster is getting heat. Further Reading: -Taylor Swift Says It Was ‘Excruciating’ to Watch Ticketmaster Debacle  -Taylor Swift Cancels Ticket Sale After Earlier Glitches  -Taylor Swift’s Concert Ticket Sales Plagued by Ticketmaster Delays  Further Listening: -Taylor Swift’s Push to Change Music Ownership  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
For decades, investing in a mix of stocks and bonds was one of the safest ways to save for retirement. But this year, that strategy has stopped working. WSJ’s Akane Otani breaks down the unique market conditions of today’s economy that are causing so much pain for retirees. Further Reading: -The Classic 60-40 Investment Strategy Falls Apart. ‘There’s No Place to Hide.’  Further Listening: -How High Will Interest Rates Go?  -Will There Be a Recession? America’s Top Bankers Weigh In  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Until last week, FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried was the face of crypto. Admirers saw him as an approachable, friendly billionaire eager to deploy his wealth for good. Then his crypto empire imploded, leaving hundreds of thousands of investors’ assets in doubt. WSJ’s Greg Zuckerman profiles the man behind FTX. Further Reading: -How FTX’s Sam Bankman-Fried Went From Crypto Golden Boy to Villain  -FTX Tapped Into Customer Accounts to Fund Risky Bets, Setting Up Its Downfall  -Alameda, FTX Executives Are Said to Have Known FTX Was Using Customer Funds  -FTX’s Collapse Leaves Employees Sick With Anger  Further Listening: -How Crypto Giant FTX Suddenly Imploded  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Zadeh Kicks, founded by Michael Malekzadeh, was once the hottest sneaker reseller on the market. It offered some coveted, limited edition shoes for cheap – a dream for sneakerheads who wanted to flip them for more money. But now Zadeh Kicks has dissolved. WSJ's Inti Pacheco explains how sneaker giant Malekzadeh came undone. Further Reading: -The $300 Million Sneaker King Comes Undone Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Every winter, the respiratory virus RSV lands tens of thousands of babies and young children in hospitals around the country. This year, the outbreak started early. WSJ's Denise Roland explains the challenges of creating an RSV vaccine. Further Reading: -GSK Poised for Pfizer Battle in RSV Vaccine Market-RSV Hospitalizations Surge, Babies Hit Hardest  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Bad Bets is WSJ’s podcast series that unravels big-business dramas that have had a big impact on our world. In season two, reporter Ben Foldy delves into the story of Nikola founder Trevor Milton, who promised a future of zero-emission trucks that could revolutionize the industry. At its peak, Nikola’s publicly traded stock was worth more than Ford Motor Co.’s—until a ragtag group of whistleblowers and short sellers revealed that Nikola and its truck weren’t all that they seemed. Find the entire series here: https://www.wsj.com/podcasts/bad-bets  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Once a leader in the world of cryptocurrency, Sam Bankman-Fried’s crypto exchange FTX is scrambling for funds. It’s now facing a shortfall of $8 billion after Binance walked away from a rescue attempt. WSJ’s Caitlin Ostroff on what this means for the crypto ecosystem.  Further Reading: -Tensions Between Crypto Giants FTX, Binance Spill Into Public View  -Binance’s Deal for Rival FTX Marks Power Shift Amid Crypto Turmoil  -The 30-Year-Old Spending $1 Billion to Save Crypto  Further Listening: -The Rise of Binance - And The Effort to Reel it In  -The ‘Death Spiral’ of a Stablecoin  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Republicans were expecting to come away with sizable wins in the midterm elections on Tuesday. But as the results come in, it's clear that those hopes have been dashed. WSJ's Siobhan Hughes explains where the election stands — and what it means for the GOP. Further Reading: -Control of Congress Remains at Stake as Democrats Fend Off an Anticipated ‘Red Wave’  Further Listening: -The Republican Push to Flip Latino Voters  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A year ago, at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, the biggest players in the financial world joined together to incorporate carbon emissions into their most fundamental decisions. As the summit reconvenes in Egypt, the group is on the rocks. WSJ’s David Benoit explains why. Further Reading: -Financial System Makes Big Promises on Climate Change at COP26 Summit  -Big Banks and U.N. Green Finance Group Clash in Alliance  -Mark Carney, Ex-Banker, Wants Banks to Pay for Climate ChangeFurther Listening:-The Fight Over Climate Change's Price Tag  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Comments (103)

steve

Rip

Nov 30th
Reply

Ayda Lloyd

Musk is destroying Twitter.

Nov 13th
Reply (2)

🤨

CDC allowing NIH to manage the COVID pandemic would be like FEMA allowing NOAA to manage hurricane relief and recovery. Totally insane.

Aug 28th
Reply

Cody Buttron

so·cial·ism /ˈsōSHəˌlizəm/ Learn to pronounce noun a political and economic theory of social organization which advocates that the means of production, distribution, and exchange should be owned or regulated by the community as a whole. com·mu·nism /ˈkämyəˌnizəm/ Learn to pronounce noun a political theory derived from Karl Marx, advocating class war and leading to a society in which all property is publicly owned and each person works and is paid according to their abilities and needs.

Aug 26th
Reply

paul sharivker

This is not socialism. This is communism. What is point of working?

Aug 26th
Reply

🤨

did you all hear that?! the "reporter" just seriously asked 'why having more bots on Twitter is a bad thing'? and the 'journalist' answered 'that's a great question'.

Jul 13th
Reply

majopareja

This is so informative, thank you!

Jun 29th
Reply

albus

wow

Jun 25th
Reply (1)

albus

wow

Jun 24th
Reply (1)

albus

noo

Jun 23rd
Reply (1)

albus

ooh

Jun 20th
Reply (1)

albus

bahaha

Jun 19th
Reply (1)

albus

wow

Jun 18th
Reply (1)

albus

cool

Jun 8th
Reply (2)

albus

lame

Jun 3rd
Reply (1)

albus

interesting

Jun 2nd
Reply

Jim Newman

Biased (and very poor reporting). I expect better from WSJ.

May 26th
Reply

🤨

20% of a country's population wants 100% of the country's attention and resources. Don't ban menthol is discrimination, ban menthol is discrimination.

May 6th
Reply

albus

so sad

May 2nd
Reply (1)

albus

fascinating

Apr 15th
Reply (1)
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