DiscoverThe Journal.
The Journal.
Claim Ownership

The Journal.

Author: The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet

Subscribed: 7,522Played: 428,286
Share

Description

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.
231 Episodes
Reverse
Dr. Anthony Fauci, a member of the White House's coronavirus task force, speaks with The Journal about the U.S.'s surge in coronavirus cases and what could be done to get the spread of the virus under control.
Facebook, Google and Twitter have stopped processing government requests for user data in Hong Kong after China imposed a new national security law. WSJ's Newley Purnell explains what led to the standoff and what it could mean for other companies there.
As college tuition has climbed at triple the rate of inflation, more families are realizing they have the power to negotiate. Now, the pandemic is giving them even more of an edge. WSJ's Josh Mitchell explains.
Millions of U.S. businesses hit by the pandemic have insurance they hope will cover their losses, sparking one of the biggest legal fights in the history of the industry. WSJ's Leslie Scism tells the story of one lawyer's fight to make the industry pay.
A growing number of companies are pulling their advertising from Facebook, including Unilever, Target and Ben & Jerry's. WSJ's Suzanne Vranica explains the ad boycott and the history of tensions between the tech giant and its biggest advertisers.
Millennials who graduated into the last recession face lower salaries, are less likely to own their homes and tend to marry later. And now, because of the pandemic, some may decide to delay having children. Allison Pohle, a reporter for WSJ Noted, explains. To check out the first issue of Noted, visit wsj.com/noted
Coronavirus cases are spiking again in the U.S. WSJ's Brianna Abbott explains the dynamics of the outbreak, and Phoenix hospital administrator Dr. Michael White talks about how his hospital is taking lessons from New York's experience with the virus.
The Trump administration this week suspended a wide range of employment visas through the end of the year. WSJ's Michelle Hackman explains how the immigration restrictions could impact the American economy - from Silicon Valley to the Jersey Shore.
Wirecard, the German payments company, was one of Europe's rare tech success stories. WSJ's Paul Davies explains how the company imploded in a matter of days after it disclosed that $2 billion had gone unaccounted for.
Adidas Reckons With Race

Adidas Reckons With Race

2020-06-2418:062

Employees at Adidas are criticizing the company for its lack of diversity and pushing it to confront racism. WSJ's Khadeeja Safdar explains the backlash at the company, and two employees share what led them to speak out.
As several states face new outbreaks of coronavirus, WSJ's Shalini Ramachandran looks back at what went wrong with the response in one of the virus's first epicenters - New York City.
President Trump resumed campaigning this weekend with a rally in Tulsa. WSJ's Michael Bender interviewed the president and explains how his messaging has changed since the coronavirus locked down the economy and protests swept the country.
Activists united under the banner of Black Lives Matter have pushed for reforms at the local and state level since 2013. Now, their policy priorities are finding traction. WSJ's Arian Campo-Flores recounts the efforts that led to this moment.
A dramatic rise in the stock market has an odd feature: Stocks in bankrupt companies and other risky bets are also climbing. WSJ's Gregory Zuckerman explains what has individual investors, many of them new to the market, jumping in.
Coronavirus cases are on the rise - and in some cases spiking - in many states that are reopening. We talk to two top health officials from Oregon and Alabama about the different ways their states are handling new outbreaks and whether they could reinstate shutdowns.
Seattle's mayor instructed police to leave a section of the city after violent clashes with protestors there. The neighborhood is now transformed into an "autonomous zone." WSJ's Jim Carlton reports on what it's like inside.
Luckin Coffee was supposed to disrupt China's coffee market. But a Wall Street Journal investigation has found that the company used fake coffee orders, fake supply orders and even a fake employee to fabricate nearly half its sales last year. WSJ's Jing Yang explains Luckin's scheme.
Black employment had climbed to a record level before the pandemic undid that progress in a matter of weeks. WSJ's Amara Omeokwe explains the fragility in the economic situation of black Americans and what that could mean for their recovery.
How Hertz Went Bankrupt

How Hertz Went Bankrupt

2020-06-1016:524

The coronavirus has pushed a number of companies into bankruptcy and exposed the debt many had racked up before the crisis. WSJ's Matt Wirz explains why Hertz is a prime example.
Activists are demanding a radical reshaping of police departments across the country. Years before this movement, one city scrapped its police department and started from scratch. Camden, N.J.'s former police chief Scott Thomson explains how they rebuilt, and what happened.
loading
Comments (21)

J.

It's a European company, you stupid jackass. Are you going to tell Li Ning that their sports brand lacks diversity because it features mostly chinese people?!

Jul 1st
Reply

Somnambulist_23

'trump came in and lied about his polling, then lied about the virus, and continued to lie for the entire interview' WSJ why give the lying criminal any platform?

Jun 24th
Reply

J.

What did you think was gonna happen when you invested in a commie company, dumbass!

Jun 13th
Reply

J.

His business got looted, he's still protesting. Anti-riot protesting?

Jun 6th
Reply

Lisa D

Excellent program. Solid questions that I wanted to ask Dr. Fauci. Thank you for this.

Apr 8th
Reply (1)

J.

It's a pissing contest. The saudis are rich, they will last. The russians are taking money from the chinese, they will also last.

Mar 14th
Reply

J.

If a Republican declares he's running on a "democratic nazism" and those millions of deaths in the 20th century were not the result of "real nazism." I think that guy would have been burned on a stake.

Feb 29th
Reply (1)

wendy awiti

Very insightful episode.

Feb 1st
Reply

Jacob De Leon

Great info, in depth reporting on various topics.

Jan 31st
Reply

Amy Byrket

This should have had a warning for content inappropriate for kids. Listeners often have kids in the car. This isn’t a podcast that would contain sensitive content

Jan 16th
Reply

Pratap Nair

Y is this podcast not working. Unable to hear any of the episodes

Dec 13th
Reply

J.

taylor is just being taylor -- an immature little girl. no matter how much she has. nothing to see here.

Nov 20th
Reply (1)

J.

This also shows you these so-called socially conscious organizations like Hollywood and the NBA, doesn't give a damn about your social justice. it's what sells. when things really matter and they have to make a true stance between right and wrong, they pick money even if it goes against everything they allegedly believe in. left learning liberal groups are not more than hypocrites.

Oct 12th
Reply

J.

What's the solution? Bring the whole crumbling to the ground that's called the chinese communist government. That God-damnn government is brainwashing china into a loser country. Take it down. Take it all down!

Oct 12th
Reply

Elijah Claude

Not one mention of Andrew Yang's Freedom Dividend.... Which is one of the only programs where both the left and the right can agree on in some way. The only plan that holds corporations accountable... 🙄

Sep 14th
Reply (1)

Xiaotao Wang

is there text of this recording, would be better!

Aug 30th
Reply

Bookshopedreams

great podcast!

Aug 13th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store