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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
790 Episodes
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Joe Biden is doing well in the polls: in traditional Democratic strongholds, in swing states, and even in historically Republican bastions. But Democratic strategists and voters both feel worried that there is something the polls are missing.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The U.S. continues to break its record daily high of new coronavirus cases. The White House has begun to openly criticize the country's most visible public health expert: Anthony Fauci.And an NPR investigation has found that some 65,000 votes were invalidated because of hang-ups with mail-in voting. As more Americans plan to vote by mail in November, such hangups could have huge consequences.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and correspondent Pam Fessler.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of Roger Stone. Stone was convicted by a jury of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. The move has prompted outcry from Democrats, Mitt Romney, and Robert Mueller.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Joe Biden has received detailed policy proposals from the joint committees he formed with Bernie Sanders, part of an effort to bring progressives into his campaign's fold. But, with Biden up by double-digits over President Trump, progressive votes seem less essential to his path to victory. And, he's released a new economic policy plan he calls "Build Back Better," an explicit counter to President Trump's economical nationalism.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected President Trump's claim that he is "categorically immune" from having his pre-presidential financial records investigated by a New York grand jury. But in a second decision on the House's request for similar information, the court questioned the breadth of congressional authority. Americans, almost certainly, will not see the president's taxes before Election Day.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The President is insistent: kids must return to school in the fall. But its not his decision to make and school districts are struggling to figure out how to open safely. Also, the Supreme Court allows more exceptions to contraception coverage. The last day of the Court's term is tomorrow.This episode: reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, education correspondent Cory Turner, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national correspondent Sarah McCammon.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The US is now regularly seeing days with more than 50,000 new cases of the coronavirus, up from the previous peak of 30 thousand a day in April. Florida is among the states hardest hit by the uptick.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, science correspondent Allison Aubrey, and national correspondent Greg Allen.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a speech Friday at Mount Rushmore, President Trump returned to the divisive "law and order" rhetoric and white identity politics that fueled his 2016 campaign. That's despite signs that the message is not as resonant this election cycle.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House reporters Ayesha Rascoe and Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The U.S. is experiencing a reckoning over the fact that the promises of America are not fulfilled equally. Black Americans share how they experience patriotism ahead of the July Fourth celebration. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist, The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The unemployment rate fell to 11.1%. But there are indications that the job growth has slowed recently amid a surge of new coronavirus infections. Follow our playlist, The NPR Politics Daily Workout.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In June, the Senate confirmed President Trump's 200th judge to the bench. With a dearth of legislative achievements to point to, reshaping the federal judiciary could be the president's most durable legacy.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist, The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Amid a renewed spike in coronavirus cases, the number of voters disapproving of the job President Trump is doing is at an all-time high, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Joe Biden is using the pandemic to attack the president. And despite a narrow loss in the Kentucky Senate primary, the progressive wing of the Democratic party is amassing power in the halls of Congress.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals, citing the Supreme Court's adherence to precedent, to invalidate a Louisiana law that required doctors at clinics that perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Plus, lawmakers in both parties are asking for more information after press reports suggested that Russian operatives have paid Afghan insurgents to target U.S. forces. This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell correspondent Sarah McCammon, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, election security editor Phil Ewing, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
At the first coronavirus taskforce briefing in months, Vice President Mike Pence reiterated that the White House was there to support states in their response to the pandemic and touted the administration's response so far despite the country's high death toll. And Attorney General William Barr talks to NPR about the pile of controversies facing the Department of Justice.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A day after Democrats blocked a Republican proposal in the Senate, they are set to pass a reform plan of their own in the House. Lawmakers appear pessimistic about the chances of compromise legislation.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The United States isn't experiencing a second wave of the coronavirus—because the first wave never ended. While original hotspots of the outbreak, like New York and New Jersey, have seen declines, population centers in the south, including Texas, are seeing record numbers of cases. White House coronavirus task force member Anthony Fauci testified about the pandemic yesterday on Capitol Hill.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, science correspondent Richard Harris, and KUT reporter Asley Lopez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Closely-watched congressional primaries in New York and Kentucky will test how well progressives fare in two very different parts of the country. And reporting from a Michigan suburb on how folks there view the racial justice protests and the president's response to the pandemic.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Kentucky Public Radio reporter Ryland Barton, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump has removed a top Justice Department official, Geoffrey Berman, whose office has overseen the prosecutions of several of the president's associates. And the president's Saturday rally was a return to form for Trump, but fell short of expectations set by his campaign.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday, President Trump will hold his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic seized the United States. The top public health official there said he hoped it would be delayed and the campaign agreed to limited public health precautions. And, new allegations from a former national security adviser draw White House ire.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Supreme Court has extended a life-support line to some 650,000 so-called "Dreamers" on Thursday, allowing them to remain safe from deportation. In the majority opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts said the decision was not about the Trump administration's authority to end the program, but rather about its "arbitrary" justification.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (440)

Daniel Wood

same here. I want to listen!

Jul 16th
Reply

Tomas Ortiz

I'm unable to download or play this episode. Oh well.

Jul 15th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

weird. I had no problem whatsoever playing this episode. and it was a good one, too!

Jul 15th
Reply

Carol Youngquist

same, can't download and can't play 🙁

Jul 15th
Reply

John

I cannot play the podcast

Jul 15th
Reply (1)

Amy Johnson

link doesn't work

Jul 14th
Reply

traviso486

I can't download this one....:-(

Jul 14th
Reply

Jennifer Kloeckner

won't let me play. it says this episode is a broken source.

Jul 14th
Reply (1)

Angela Joan

I listen everyday & donate money every month to my local public radio station. I wouldn't want to live in a world without NPR & I'm so grateful for the brave reporters on the NPR Politics podcast!

Jul 10th
Reply

alli lent

yet another reason to separate health care and employment

Jul 8th
Reply

alli lent

we can go ahead and skip the trump clips.. I very intentionally do not listen to anything he ever says anymore.

Jun 23rd
Reply

Mason Carey

Mara said the white mob killed "dozens" of black Americans in the Tulsa massacre. In reality it was around 300.

Jun 19th
Reply (3)

Lori

So in response to the Gen Z vs Millennial conversation and Harry Potter: my Gen Z daughter is obsessed with Harry Potter BUT because of JK Rowling's refusal to accept people who don't identify with their gender assigned at birth we as a family have now boycotted her and all Harry Potter products and offshoots. To the listeners can't let it go: Congratulations on your top surgery. Be safe and stay strong. HAPPY PRIDE MONTH

Jun 19th
Reply (3)

Michael Berrier

uh, it's Monday

Jun 15th
Reply

غريب الحظ

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Jun 12th
Reply

Happy New Year's!

Actually, NPR's own Planet Money (or maybe it was The Indicator) did an episode where the talked about the idea of a person being worth a financial sum. I forget what number they came up (probably higher than $20). It's fascinating and uncomfortable but I suppose an economist needs to crunch those numbers occasionally in their job. Give it a listen!

Jun 11th
Reply

Laura D

new voting machines you say? has anyone checked on Ivankas voting machines she bought from China back in '16-'17??? wouldn't that be a silly if they were hers??

Jun 9th
Reply

Tony Hernandez

people going back to work that all this was

Jun 9th
Reply

Jimmy Jurassic

"That black guy who got killed by the cops." "Which one?" "The one who they suffocated." "Which one?"

Jun 2nd
Reply

Dk

"you know", "just stuff", "just things like that", and "what not." Vague and personal impressions. I am still though a huge fan of Planet Money!

May 31st
Reply
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