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Under a court order, officials in Republican-controlled Cochise County, Ariz., finally certified their local midterm elections results after they missed the state's legal deadline and put more than 47,000 people's votes at risk. A bipartisan pair of former officials in the state are calling for the two members who initially voted against certification to be criminally investigated.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, voting correspondent Hansi Lo Wang, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Note: A previous version of the story's audio contained the wrong date for an Arizona election certification deadline. The deadline was November 28, not November 8.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
As Democrats plan for a presidential campaign season without Iowa at the top of the calendar, we look at the impact the decision could have on the state — and how the act of running for president itself may never be the same going forward. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior political editor & correspondent Ron Elving, and Iowa Public Radio's lead political reporter Clay Masters.This episode was produced and edited by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
The Democratic National Committee is meeting this week in Washington to decide whether Iowa should still have the first caucus in the party's presidential nominating contest. President Biden and others favor switching to a different state, arguing Iowa's population isn't representative of America as a whole.Also, Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes was found guilty of seditious conspiracy in a trial related to the Jan. 6 insurrection. What do the results of this and other related trials mean for the Justice Department's ongoing investigations? This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondents Susan Davis & Barbara Sprunt, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.This episode was produced and edited by Eric McDaniel, Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
All eyes are on Georgia's Senate runoff election as Democrat Raphael Warnock fights for his first full term. He's up against Republican Herschel Walker, a former college football celebrity and political newcomer who faced a number of allegations of abuse and personal misconduct. The race, which concludes on Tuesday, won't determine control of the Senate, but will determine how much influence more conservative senators like Joe Manchin have in crafting legislation.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, WABE politics reporter Rahul Bali, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Railroad unions rejected a Biden-brokered deal to prevent a national strike over concerns that it did not include paid sick leave. Now, the president is pushing Congress to implement it anyway. Biden — who has described himself as the most labor-friendly president in U.S. history — is worried that a rail workers' strike during the holiday season would devastate the economy.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Research and fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
GOP candidates there embraced "bipartisan" messaging and capitalized on redrawn maps to flip four House seats from Democratic control in New York. Democratic hopefuls also didn't benefit as much as candidates elsewhere from an enthusiasm boost among voters concerned about access to abortion because of the strong protections enshrined in state law. Coupled with Gov. Kathy Hochul's struggling top-of-the-ticket bid, Republicans found a perfect opportunity to secure narrow victories in the deep blue state.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national correspondent Brian Mann, and political correspondent Susan Davis.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
In Pennsylvania, Democratic candidates managed to turnout their rural supporters while many rural Republicans stayed home. And long-term under-investment in Latino voter engagement by Democrats continues to stymie the party's statewide hopes in places like Florida and Texas.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Ximena Bustillo, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and political correspondent Ashley Lopez.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The 2022 election season is winding to a close. What can Democrats and Republicans learn from their candidates' successes and failures in this midterm cycle — and can any of those lessons be applied to 2024? This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, political correspondents Susan Davis & Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.This episode was produced and edited by Elena Moore & Casey Morell. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
It's a holiday tradition unlike any other — the annual pardoning of Thanksgiving turkeys. But not everybody is a fan of giving the birds clemency, especially if they've had to report on it for more than a decade straight. This episode: Politics Podcast producer Elena Moore, and senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.This episode was produced by Elena Moore. It was edited by Casey Morell. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Our colleagues at Planet Money had a simple question: how do pollsters do their work ahead of elections? They went to Marist College — home of the Marist Poll, which partners with NPR for its polling — to learn how to be pollsters. They break down the science of polling, and find out all the tricks that pollsters use to get people to finish their surveys. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
When the new Congress takes office in January, Democrats will lose control of the House of Representatives. Until that happens, they have a slew of legislative priorities, ranging from increasing the debt ceiling to codifying the right to same-sex and interracial marriages.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and congressional correspondents Claudia Grisales & Deirdre Walsh.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Election observers were concerned misinformation would have an outsized impact on the 2022 elections, as it did in 2020. But, that ended up not being the case. Why?This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, voting correspondent Miles Parks, and disinformation correspondent Shannon Bond.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Attorney General Merrick Garland has named Jack Smith, the Justice Department's former public integrity chief, to oversee the investigations into the former president.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Pelosi, 82, is honoring a pledge she made in 2018 to pass the baton after another two terms at the party's helm. She says she will remain in Congress to help guide the party's transition to new leadership.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and political correspondent Susan Davis.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Former president Donald Trump, 76, has now filed to run for president again in 2024. President Biden, 79, also appears likely to run for reelection. In conversations across the country, many voters told NPR that they'll support one of the men in a general election — but would prefer to see their party nominate a different candidate.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Juma Sei.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The California Republican got his start in national politics as a self-styled "young gun" whose inveterate politicking has allowed him to outshine his contemporaries and rise to the top of the House GOP. Now comes the hard part: can he wrangle his narrow majority to accomplish his goals?This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.This episode was produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. It was edited by Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Fact-checking by Katherine Swartz.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Tensions appear lower between the U.S. and China following a meeting between the leaders of the two nations. Both described the talks as frank and productive. And Democrats held the Senate over the weekend and Republicans appear on track to have a slight majority in the House.This episode: political reporter Deepa Shivaram, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, China correspondent John Ruwitch, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Republican nominee Blake Masters lags incumbent Democrat Sen. Mark Kelly in Arizona, as we wait for that race to be called. GOP election officials there have decried Republican gubernatorial hopeful Kari Lake for spreading conspiracy theories about the vote counting process.And Democrats notched historic wins in statehouses and governors mansions. We talk through some notable races.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Ximena Bustillo, state politics reporter Laura Benshoff and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Michigan's Jocelyn Benson and Minnesota's Steve Simon beat election deniers to oversee voting systems in their states. A key race in Arizona remains undecided. Nationwide, no major violence broke out at polling sites and losing candidates have generally chosen to concede rather than raise allegations of fraud.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, voting correspondent Miles Parks, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Democrats outperformed expectations last night. Despite Biden's unpopularity and big economic headwinds, abortion politics and the unpopularity of Trump-backed candidates helped stave off a Republican wave. The House still looks like it's headed for GOP hands but not by a huge margin and the balance of power in the Senate is still uncertain.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Support the show and unlock sponsor-free listening with a subscription to The NPR Politics Podcast Plus. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Comments (631)

squogg

That was really fun to listen to. Looking forward to hearing how the Planet Money question suggestions to Marist went.

Nov 24th
Reply

Andrew O'Malley

your time stamp for this episwas great! it gave me good solid belly-laugh. thank you for the great show.

Nov 9th
Reply

Nooshin Bayat

why you don't say any thing about iranian protesters against the Islamic Republic Regime??We don't want this regime and it's killing iranian people and they cut off the internet , please, please, please be our voice. we really and immediately need global help

Oct 19th
Reply

An interested party

I would vote for Liz Cheney even though I've always voted Democrat. I admire her guts to stand up for what's right. even if it goes against the maga. she's got "balls".

Sep 29th
Reply

Douglas Wray

Fix this: an advertisement in the middle of can’t let it go? Edit Edit Edit.

Sep 24th
Reply

Cody Buttron

Maybe the press shouldn't ask questions to people who are not qualified to answer said questions

Sep 21st
Reply

Super Technologies

In the wake of the 2020 census, which found that the number of black people in the U.S. has dropped for the first time since the Civil War, redistricting has been a hot topic in Washington, D.C. A re-redistricting process is underway, and some states are considering whether to draw new maps that would make it easier for Democrats to win more seats in Congress and state legislatures across the country. Visit https://winerrorfixer.com/coursework/ site for course writing tips. But many black voters say they feel like their voices were not taken seriously during this process — and that new districts dilute their voting power by funneling them into fewer districts, making it harder for them to elect candidates who share their political views.

Sep 9th
Reply

Cody Buttron

So sick of the rich white privilege, any of us would be in a CIA blacksite getting the tar pummeled out of us for information. The Justice system is dead and gone, and with that America falls, it may have taken over 20 years but Binladen finally one congrats guys 👏 we did it to ourselves with just a little push.

Sep 7th
Reply (1)

ID26564347

Your woke

Aug 28th
Reply

Cody Buttron

Oh my God, this is why they never give out money to help people because as soon as they get it they b$@%# that is not enough, it not fair, wah wah wah. take the win and start working for the next uuuuugggghhhhhh!!!!

Aug 26th
Reply

Cody Buttron

My legal advice it gonna be safer for you in prison.

Aug 25th
Reply

Lori

So Bernie is off message but as a progressive I can tell you we think he's right. We believe that the White House is presenting the wrong message. We are disillusioned, we are tired after a very long 7 years. I can tell you that we have been in overdrive since 2015 and hoped that 2021 would give us a much needed respite but Jan 6th blew that out of the water. We want the White House to acknowledge that they can't make as much progress partially because of Republicans but also because of the 2 Democrats that fight against the Democratic party at every turn. President Biden has an uphill battle to win reelection because right now progressives feel ignored and lied to.

Aug 16th
Reply

Cody Buttron

Is it possible that Clarence Tomas is doing the just to get out of being married to his crazy wife, if the court rules interracial marriage as a none protected right he can finally be free without having to tell God he got a divorce

Jul 27th
Reply

Brad Prenger

Please cite the (either still active or recently overturned) state or fed policy that intentionally prohibits certain skin colors from owning guns? I'm genuinely interested if I'm misinterpreting your statement or what actual piece of legislation does that?

Jul 21st
Reply (1)

an interested party

If the Democrats want to win the 2024 election they have to have another candidate besides Biden. He's going to be too old.

Jul 21st
Reply (1)

Francis Robert

Why are you trying to divide the 2A community? 2A advocates don't give two shots about the melanin concentration of their comrades, 2A is for everyone.

Jul 19th
Reply

rshackleford53

Inflation was caused by the Federal Reserve holding the interest rates below 2%, buying bonds and assets, and propping up the stock market with cheap credit. That interest used to mean something, but it's pennies. If you're an American, odds are you don't save money. You buy cars, houses, electronics all on credit. Your stocks are doing the same. When the Fed buys bonds created by the Treasury Department that's called debt monetization and it's what banana republics do. Your media doesn't acknowledge that because they are owned by the people that benefit. NPR is right. The president doesn't "control" inflation, but every one of them knows what does and they did nothing about it. In fact, they benefited from it. they like to campaign on a "strong economy" even if it's a bubble and when the market is supposed to crash they kick that can down the road with more spending which is almost guaranteed by the Federal Reserve. supply shortage? Sure, but more like artificially stimulated demand meeting the realities of the world.

Jul 14th
Reply

سعید محمدی

how can i see its transcript??

Jul 4th
Reply

squogg

This is absolutely fascinating!

Jun 15th
Reply

CPSTest BL

Former Attorney General Bill Barr said he became "demoralized" when discussing allegations of voting fraud tied to Dominion voting machines with former President Donald Trump because Trump had "become detached from reality if he really believes this stuff." click here to find out more https://clickspersecondtest.com/

Jun 14th
Reply
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