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Trump's Trials

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Reporting and analysis on the inquiries, trials, and criminal probes facing former President Donald Trump. From the Jan. 6 insurrection and Georgia election interference, to the ongoing question of classified documents - and beyond - host Scott Detrow, political editor Domenico Montanaro and legal experts dive deep every week to explore the news inside the courtrooms and the stakes for American democracy.

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30 Episodes
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This week on Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow and Domenico Montanaro are joined by a Pulitzer prize-winning journalist and author of three books about Trump David Cay Johnston.Over the course of four weeks former President Donald Trump was slapped with nearly half a billion dollars in legal penalties. First a jury ordered him to pay writer E. Jean Carroll $83.3 million. Then a judge ordered him to pay nearly $355 million, plus $100 million in interest, for fraudulent business practices. We look into how Trump could pay these penalties and how he's paying for his lawyers. Topics include: - Importance of wealth to Trump's image- Civil fraud and E. Jean Carroll decisions- How Trump could pay legal penalties - How Trump is paying his lawyersFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This week on Trump's Trials, host Miles Parks and Domenico Montanaro are joined by New York University law professor Melissa Murray.This week we saw developments in all four of the criminal cases facing former President Donald Trump. We also got decision in the New York civil fraud case, where a judge ordered Trump to pay $355 million and banned him from doing business in New York for three years. But we're focusing on two of these cases — the New York hush money case and the Georgia election interference case. First in New York, a judge ruled the case will go to trial on March 25th; making it the first time in American history a former president will be a defendant in a criminal case.In Georgia, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis surprised everyone when she took the stand in her own defense. Defendants in the Georgia election interference case are trying to have Willis removed for allegedly financially benefitting from a relationship she had with special prosecutor Nathan Wade. Topics include: - Trial date for New York hush money case - Importance of the hush money case - What jury selection may look like - Georgia election interference case- What happens if Willis is removed Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Juana Summers speaks NPR's Andrea Bernstein.A New York judge has ordered former President Donald Trump and his companies to pay nearly $355 million in penalties for inflating the value of his properties and other assets. The verdict also banned Trump from operating his New York business and applying for loans in the state for three years. This follows a sometimes contentious three-month trial that was decided by a judge and not a jury.Topics include:- Civil fraud verdict - Money owed - Possible Trump appeal Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks NPR's Andrea Bernstein and Georgia politics reporter Sam Gringlas. On March 25th the New York hush money case will go to trial, making it the first time a former president will be defendant in a criminal trial. Former President Donald Trump is facing 34 counts related to falsifying business records during the 2016 campaign in order to keep past affairs a secret. This will be the first of the four criminal cases to go to trial. In Georgia, an evidence hearing was held over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis should be removed from the election interference case. Willis is accused of having an improper relationship with Nathan Wade, a prosecutor she hired to work on the case. They have acknowledge the relationship but denied Willis financially benefited from it. Willis and Wade both took the stand in defense of themselves. Topics include:- Trial schedule for New York hush money case - Evidence hearing for Georgia election interference case - Efforts to disqualify Willis- Willis and Wade testimony Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Juana Summers speaks with senior political correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Former President Donald Trump is facing a big week in all four of the criminal cases against him. Two of the biggest developments are set to come out of New York and Georgia. In the New York hush money case, a judge will determine this week if the case will begin as scheduled on March 25th. Meanwhile, in Georgia, a hearing is set this week to determine whether Fulton Country District Attorney Fani Willis should be disqualified from the state's election interference case over allegations she misused public funds. At the same time, the Supreme Court is considering whether to weigh in on a lower court's decision that Trump is not immune from prosecution in the Jan. 6 case. And in the classified documents case, the judge is considering Trump's lawyers' motion to postpone deadlines that could push the case back from its scheduled May 20th start date.Topics include:- Immunity appeal- Florida classified documents case- Trial schedule for New York hush money case- Georgia evidence hearing Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This week on Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow and Domenico Montanaro are joined by former US attorney and deputy assistant attorney general Harry Litman.It was a big week in the Trump legal world. There was the decision on presidential immunity, spoiler alert - he doesn't have it. And then there were those Supreme Court oral arguments in the Colorado ballot case, where the justices seemed skeptical of an individual state being able to disqualify Trump from seeking office again. To cap off the week, President Biden was exonerated in a separate classified documents investigation, but the special prosecutor's report questioned the strength of Biden's memory. Topics include: - Immunity decision- Supreme Court oral arguments- How the immunity and Colorado cases intersect - Is Biden's document situation similar to Trump's- Predictions on future decisions and timeline Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Scott Detrow speaks to Chief Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, Washington Desk Senior Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving and UCLA law professor and election law expert Rick Hasen.On Thursday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments over whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from running for office on the basis of Section 3 of the 14th amendment. The justices sparred with attorneys from both sides, questioning their justification to remove or keep Trump on the ballot. The justices appeared skeptical of individual states having the power to decide who is able to run for president, at least without congressional action.Topics include:- Trump's legal argument - Colorado's legal argument - Justice's reactions- What's next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Scott Detrow speaks to Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. On Thursday, the Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments in the Colorado ballot case. This case centers on whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from running for office on the basis of Section 3 of the 14th amendment. The once little-known clause bars anyone who swore an oath to support the Constitution and then "engaged in insurrection" against it from holding office. The Colorado Supreme Court determined that Trump had engaged in an insurrection and removed him from the state's primary ballot. Topics include:- Origins of the case- What to look for during the arguments - Trump's defense arguments Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Former President Donald Trump does not enjoy broad immunity from federal prosecution. That was the ruling from a three-judge panel on the U.S. Court of Appeals D.C. Circuit. The judges also gave Trump six days to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.Topics include:- Details of the D.C. Appeals ruling - Political and legal calendar - What's nextFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Georgia on our minds

Georgia on our minds

2024-02-0421:29

This week on Trump's Trials, guest host Miles Parks and Domenico Montanaro are joined by constitutional expert and lawyer Kim Wehle.Now that Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has admitted to having a relationship with prosecutor Nathan Wade, there continues to be calls for her removal from the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump. Legally she may not be required to step aside. But politically, the relationship complicates the perception of the case in the public eye. We also preview oral arguments taking place on Thursday at the Supreme Court in the Colorado ballot case that could determine whether Trump is eligible to run for office. Topics include: - Fani Willis' motion - What's next in the Georgia election interference case - Preview of Supreme Court oral arguments - How section 3 of the 14th Amendment applies Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with political reporter Stephen Fowler.In a court filing on Friday, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis admitted to having a relationship with prosecutor Nathan Wade, but denied any misconduct. Willis hired Wade to prosecute the Georgia election interference case against former President Donald Trump. In the 176-page brief, Willis said allegations that she and Wade financially benefit from prosecuting the case are "meritless" and asked the judge to deny the request to dismiss her and the case without an evidentiary hearing. Topics include:- Willis' defense - Effect on criminal case- What comes next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Steve Inskeep speaks with historians Jill Lepore and David Blight. Lepore and Blight have submitted a friend of the court brief to the Supreme Court ahead of oral arguments on whether former President Donald Trump should remain on the Colorado ballot. Colorado's Supreme Court said Trump is not qualified for the presidency under the Constitution's 14th Amendment. Section 3 of that amendment says you can't serve in federal office if you once took an oath to support the United States and then engaged in an insurrection or rebellion. Both Lepore and Blight argue that Section three of the 14th amendment disqualifies Trump from serving again as president.Topics include:- Historical context of the 14th amendment - Historical intention of section three - What does it mean to have 'engaged in insurrection'- Interpreting the Constitution Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Delays, delays, delays

Delays, delays, delays

2024-01-2714:57

This week on Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow is joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. In this episode we take a step back to look at where the four criminal cases former President Donald Trump is facing currently stand. There's the classified documents case in Florida, the hush money case involving Stormy Daniels in New York, the Georgia election interference case and the Jan. 6th federal election interference case.Topics include: - Updates on all of Trump's criminal cases - Trial date speculation - What comes next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to NPR's Andrea Bernstein.A jury has awarded writer E. Jean Carroll $83.3 million in a civil defamation suit against former President Donald Trump. In a previous defamation trial Trump was found to have sexually abused and defamed Carroll. The jury in that case awarded her $5 million. Topics include:- How jury came up with $83.3 million figure- Trump's reaction- What's nextFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Juana Summers speaks to NPR's Andrea Bernstein.Former President Donald Trump was back in court on Thursday to testify in the second civil defamation damages trial brought by writer E. Jean Carroll. The jury in a separate civil trial last year awarded Carroll $5 million, finding Trump sexually abused and defamed her. Trump spoke briefly on the stand on Thursday, saying the allegations were false. Topics include:- Defense resting its case - Trump's testimony- Outcome predictions Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks to lawyer and ethics expert Norman Eisen. We hear why Eisen is calling on special counsel Nathan Wade to resign from his post in the Georgia election interference case. Wade has come under fire for accusations of having an improper relationship with Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis, who hired him to prosecute the case against Trump. Neither Willis nor Wade have made an official statement regarding the accusations. Topics include:- Legal requirements to remove a prosecutor - Ethical issues in the case- Distractions to the Georgia interference case Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This week on Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow and Domenico Montanaro are joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson.This week's focus: Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has come under scrutiny after a codefendant in Trump's Georgia election case accused her, without evidence, of having an improper relationship with attorney Nathan Wade, whom she hired to prosecute the case. Wade is currently going through a divorce and documents from that proceeding show Wade bought airline tickets for himself and Willis for flights together. Willis has yet to fully address the allegations and the judge in this case has set a hearing on the matter. In the absence of a response from Willis to the allegations, Trump and his allies have seized the moment to discredit her. Topics include: - Georgia election interference case- Allegations of misconduct- Update on Florida classified documents case- Iowa caucuses resultsFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.orgLearn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, NPR's Juana Summers speaks to NPR's Andrea Bernstein.A day after winning the Iowa caucuses by nearly 30 points, former President Donald Trump appeared in a Manhattan courtroom to face a second defamation lawsuit brought by writer E. Jean Carroll. Last year, a jury found that Trump sexually abused Carroll in the 1990s and ordered Trump to pay her $5 million for defaming her in recent years. This second case centers around additional comments Trump made about Carroll that have already been deemed defamatory by a judge. Carroll is seeking ten million dollars in addition to what she was already awarded last year. Topics include:- Trump back in the courtroom - A breakdown of Carroll's claims- A look at what comes next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
This week on Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow and Domenico Montanaro are joined by New York University law professor Melissa Murray.This week's focus: The DC Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on former president Donald Trump's expansive view of presidential immunity. The three-judge panel seemed skeptical at times with the extensive scope of Trump's legal team argument — that the president could even order a political assassination and be immune from criminal prosecution so long as he wasn't convicted in an impeachment hearing. Plus we heard closing arguments in the New York civil fraud case. Topics include: - Scope of presidential immunity - Strength of Trump team's arguments - Possible appeals and timelines - New York civil fraud case- Georgia election interference case Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this bonus episode of Trump's Trials, guest host Sacha Pfeiffer is joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. The DC Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments from federal prosecutors and former President Donald Trump's legal team on the question of whether Trump is immune from criminal prosecution for his actions on January 6th and attempts to overturn the 2020 election.Topics include:- Arguments over the scope of presidential immunity - Possible decision outcomes - Political implications - What comes next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
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Carlos Barron

The podcast episode "Trump's Trials" provides a comprehensive exploration of the various challenges and controversies surrounding the former President, Donald Trump. The host skillfully navigates through the intricate web of legal issues, political turmoil, and public reactions that have defined Trump's post-presidential period. https://newyorkcity.bubblelife.com/community/deli_paper_pros The episode delves into the investigations, lawsuits, and impeachment trials that have marked this phase of Trump's career, offering listeners a nuanced understanding of the complexities involved. Furthermore, the expert commentary and analysis provided by the guests add depth to the discussion, shedding light on the legal implications and political ramifications of Trump's trials. https://www.merchantcircle.com/deli-paper-pros-fresh-meadows-ny

Nov 16th
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