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Trump's Trials

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Reporting and analysis on the inquiries, trials, and criminal probes facing former President Donald Trump. From the Jan. 6 insurrection and Georgia election interference, to the ongoing question of classified documents - and beyond - host Scott Detrow, political editor Domenico Montanaro and legal experts dive deep every week to explore the news inside the courtrooms and the stakes for American democracy.

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86 Episodes
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For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with Constitutional expert Kim Wehle.Federal Judge Aileen Cannon dismissed former President Donald Trump's classified documents case on Monday. Cannon ruled the appointment of Jack Smith to special counsel was unconstitutional and therefore the indictment should be dismissed. Trump faced 40 felony counts for allegedly taking classified material and obstructing the government's efforts to retrieve them. Special Counsel Jack Smith has already filed an appeal — and this could very likely make its way to the Supreme Court. Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered's Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Greg Allen and Carrie Johnson.Federal Judge Aileen Cannon has dismissed former President Donald Trump's classified documents case in Florida. The ruling argued that the initial appointment of Special Counsel Jack Smith was unconstitutional. Most legal observers saw the case as the one with the most clear-cut evidence against him.The ruling comes after months of delays from Cannon, a judge nominated by Trump, who has come under increasing scrutiny for how she has handled this case.Topics include:- how Judge Cannon explained her ruling- reaction from Trump and his team- where the other three criminal cases against Trump stand Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with Daniel Ziblatt and Steven Levitsky, the authors of How Democracies Die and Tyranny of the Minority.The Supreme Court's landmark decision ruling that president's enjoy broad immunity from criminal prosecution stunned many constitutional experts. Ziblatt and Levitsky see it as the latest move that has put America's democracy in danger of "collapse." In this episode we dive into the state of America's democracy and what can be done to save it. Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Domenico Montanaro speaks with former deputy assistant attorney general Harry Litman. The Supreme Court's landmark decision on presidential immunity is complicating all of the pending legal cases against former President Donald Trump. Even the hush money trial where he was already convicted is getting a second look to determine what, if any, evidence violates the Supreme Court's ruling. Topics include:- Reaction to immunity decision- How decision affects Trump's legal casesFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson.In 1974 the Supreme Court unanimously ruled in United States v. Nixon, that Nixon must to comply with a subpoena and hand over his White House tapes. It was a blow to Nixon's presidency and two weeks later he resigned from office. But what would've happened if today's Supreme Court was on the bench in 1974? Carrie Johnson spoke with people involved in Watergate to find out. Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with University of Baltimore law professor Kim Wahle and later, NPR senior editor and political correspondent Domenico Montanaro.In a 6-to-3 decision, along ideological lines, the Court ruled that presidents have absolute immunity for their core constitutional powers, and are entitled to a presumption of immunity for other official acts. But they also ruled that presidents do not have immunity for unofficial acts. The decision will affect the federal election interference case and the Georgia election interference case. Topics include:- Supreme Court immunity decision- Federal election interference case- Georgia election interference case Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson.The Supreme Court ruled federal prosecutors improperly charged hundreds of January 6ths defendants — and potentially, even former President Donald Trump. The majority found the charge — obstructing an official proceeding — does not apply unless the Justice Department can prove a defendant interfered with official documents. Therefore solely storming the Capitol to interrupt the certification of the 2020 election is not enough to warrant the charge. Topics include:- Supreme Court ruling- Impact of federal election interference caseFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson and with retired federal judge Shira Scheindlin. Judge Aileen Cannon continues to make decisions in the Florida classified documents case that strike some legal observers as odd. Retired federal judge Shira Scheindlin gave us her view on Cannon's choices and why she thinks Cannon is moving slowly through pre-trial motions. Topics include:- Update on classified documents case - Cannon's decisions - lookahead to pre-trial hearing Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.It's been a little over a week since a jury found former President Donald Trump guilty of 34 felony counts in the New York hush money trial. Unsurprisingly, Republicans and conservative commentators have stood by Trump claiming, without evidence, that the trial was "rigged." Along with those false claims, conservatives are also calling for Trump to exact "revenge" if he's elected as president and back in control of the Justice Department.Topics include:- Republican response to conviction- Threats of revenge - Trump fundraising Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Now that former President Donald Trump has been convicted on 34 felony counts, many Americans are wondering what comes next? Will he file an appeal? Will he be sentenced to jail? And how will his conviction affect the presidential race? Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow gets into all these questions and more with NPR Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro and Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson.Topics include:- Possible sentencing - How conviction plays out in the campaign - Importance of rule of lawFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
Never before has a former or sitting U.S. president been convicted of felony crimes. Until now.A jury of 12 New Yorkers found former President Donald Trump guilty of 34 counts of falsifying business records to cover up a hush money payment to adult film star Stormy Daniels ahead of the 2016 presidential election. Hosts Scott Detrow and Juana Summers are joined by an NPR roundtable — Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson, Senior Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro, White House Correspondent Franco Ordenez, Boston University professor Jed Shugerman, and from the courthouse, Andrea Bernstein. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, we hand the mic over to Consider This. Host Juana Summers speaks with Fordham law professor Adam Shlahet.Jurors heard closing arguments on Tuesday in the criminal trial of former President Donald Trump. It's now up to them to decide whether Trump falsified business records to cover up an alleged affair with adult film star Stormy Daniels ahead of the 2016 presidential election. Topics include:- The prosecution and defense's tactics in their closing arguments- The impact closing arguments could have on the jury's final decision- How long it might take the jury to reach a verdictFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with legal expert Harry Litman. Closing arguments in former President Donald Trump's hush money trial are expected to begin on Tuesday. And if all goes according to plan, the jury will begin deliberations on Wednesday. That means there's a chance a verdict is reached as soon as next week. We break down three possible outcomes the jury could reach — guilty, not guilty, or a hung jury.Topics include:- Prosecution and defense rest - Jury instructions - Possible verdicts Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR correspondent Greg Allen.In Florida, Federal Judge Aileen Cannon held a pre-trial hearing on Wednesday to dismiss the classified documents case against former President Donald Trump and two co-defendants.And in Georgia, both the prosecutor and judge in Trump's election interference case have won elections. Prosecutor Fani Willis won her Democratic primary and will face a Republican who interned in the Trump White House in the general election in November. Meanwhile, Judge Scott McAfee, who's overseeing the election interference case easily won his election to his first full term after being appointed last year. Topics include:- Florida classified documents case- Fulton County DA Fani Willis- Judge Scott McAfeeFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein.Testimony in Former President Donald Trump's criminal trial in New York is now in the books. The prosecution and the defense have rested, and Trump did not testify.Topics include:- Testimony from the defense's witnesses- What's nextFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein.The prosecution has rested its case with the conclusion of its star witness Michael Cohen in former President Donald Trump's hush money trial. Topics include:- Cohen's testimony- What's nextFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR political reporter Ximena Bustillo and Boston University law professor Jed Shugerman. The prosecution's star witness, Michael Cohen was on the stand for three days this week. He testified about the alleged scheme to pay off adult film star Stormy Daniels and the alleged business fraud that followed. Cohen placed former President Trump at the scene saying he was aware and involved in the alleged cover up. But Cohen is an admitted liar and the defense called into question his credibility.Cohen is expected back on the stand on Monday and is likely the prosecution's final witness. Closing statements may begin as soon as Tuesday.Topics include:- Michael Cohen testimony- What prosecution needs to prove- What's nextFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Juana Summers speaks with NPR political reporter Ximena Bustillo. The prosecution's star witness Michael Cohen was back on the stand today in former President Donald Trump's hush money trial. Trump's defense team took direct aim at Cohen's credibility, asking him about his criminal history, times he's lied and questioned his memory of events. Topics include:- Cross-examination of Cohen- What's next Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Juana Summers speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein and attorney Kim Wehle.Donald Trump's former fixer Michael Cohen spent a second day on the witness stand testifying against his one time boss. Cohen mostly testified about purposefully mislabeling checks, false receipts and his previous loyalty to Trump. Cohen was aggressively cross-examined by Trump's defense team over social media statements he's made about Trump and whether he wants to see Trump in jail. Cohen is expected to be the final witness for the prosecution then defense will present their case to the jury. Topics include:- Cohen testimony - Cross-examination of CohenFollow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
For this episode of Trump's Trials, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein and attorney Andrew Weissmann.Donald Trump's former personal attorney and "fixer" Michael Cohen gave an extended, first-hand account of what happened in the turbulent months at the end of the 2016 campaign.At the New York criminal courthouse, Cohen said that then-presidential candidate Trump directed him to negotiate an agreement with adult film actor Stormy Daniels. Topics include:- What Cohen said on the stand- If Cohen's testimony is necessary in this case- A preview of the defense's strategy for cross examination Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
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Comments (6)

Tony Lovell

You need to do a show that discusses the supposed laws and principles upon which the majority claims to have made this decision. Mitch McConnell declined to impeach Trump because he could be held criminally liable after leaving the office. Everyone has ever held such a view. In my view. the Court is not interpreting our laws: it is rewriting them along lines entirely contrary to the body of American democracy.

Jul 7th
Reply (1)

Tony Lovell

finally. but there are a dangerous number of nutters who will still vote for him

May 31st
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Tony Lovell

This is lunacy. The central theme of the Constitution is balance of power. And yet, without a hint of support for the idea within that document, these mock justices seek to invent immunity for one (not three... one) of the three arms of the US government. Why aren't governors and senators offered immunity? No answer. The court needs to admit that Trump is being prosecuted for crimes he committed. His lack of immunity is a good, necessary feature of the government the Founders intended

Apr 28th
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Carlos Barron

The podcast episode "Trump's Trials" provides a comprehensive exploration of the various challenges and controversies surrounding the former President, Donald Trump. The host skillfully navigates through the intricate web of legal issues, political turmoil, and public reactions that have defined Trump's post-presidential period. https://newyorkcity.bubblelife.com/community/deli_paper_pros The episode delves into the investigations, lawsuits, and impeachment trials that have marked this phase of Trump's career, offering listeners a nuanced understanding of the complexities involved. Furthermore, the expert commentary and analysis provided by the guests add depth to the discussion, shedding light on the legal implications and political ramifications of Trump's trials. https://www.merchantcircle.com/deli-paper-pros-fresh-meadows-ny

Nov 16th
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