DiscoverTumble Science Podcast for Kids
Tumble Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble Science Podcast for Kids

Author: Tumble Media / Gen-Z Media

Subscribed: 19,921Played: 97,408
Share

Description

Exploring stories of science discovery. Tumble is a science podcast created to be enjoyed by the entire family. Hosted & produced by Lindsay Patterson (science journalist) & Marshall Escamilla (teacher). Visit www.sciencepodcastforkids.com for more information and educational content.
127 Episodes
Reverse
Mystery Recipe is a children’s podcast about cooking from America’s Test Kitchen Kids. Hosted by Molly Birnbaum (our guest on “The Science of Smell”), the series is a journey through different ingredients, all leading up to a grand finale cook along! The recipe is a MYSTERY—will you be able to guess what it is? Today we’re featuring the first episode. If you like what you hear, the first season is available wherever you get your podcasts. Tumble is working on exciting new projects, and we’ll be sharing them with you soon! Stay tuned for more!
Stoopkids Stories is a storytelling podcast about Black characters navigating and overcoming different obstacles with family, friends and community. It’s hosted and written by performer Melly Victor. This episode, called “The BB Twins” is all about dance. It’s about two twins who hit it big with a dance they upload to the internet. Their success opens a big new opportunity - but is it one they want to take? We hope you enjoy the story, and maybe it will start some important conversations! You can subscribe to Stoopkids Stories wherever you listen to podcasts. To find more podcasts featuring Black voices and Black creators, check out the podcasts on this list by the School Library Journal. Tumble is taking a break from regular episodes, but we’ll be back with some VERY SPECIAL PROJECTS we have in the works, throughout the summer! And don’t worry, birthday shoutouts are still in effect! To get one, just pledge at the $5 level or higher at patreon.com/tumblepodcast.
Reinventing The Wheel

Reinventing The Wheel

2020-05-2913:38

How would you reinvent something that’s been used for thousands of years, by millions of people? In this episode, we discover the process of invention with Rory Cooper, an engineer who revolutionized the wheelchair. He’s our guide to time traveling back to the kings and queens who used wheelchairs, and to the future of rideable robots. Anyone want a ride on a Mars rover?! Listen to more of our interview with Rory Cooper, when you become a member on Patreon! Just $1/month gets you access to our special bonus interview episodes with all our scientists. Pledge at patreon.com/tumblepodcast.  Watch videos of Rory’s wheelchairs (including the waterpark wheelchair in action!) at our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
Would you fly to the top of a volcano that’s about to erupt at any moment? Volcanologist Helena Buurman did, and survived to tell the tale! In 2008, Helena was monitoring Mount Redoubt in Alaska, when the ground beneath the volcano began to shake. What follows is a tale of volcanic adventure, involving earthquakes, helicopters, and a massive eruption!  We invite you to invent your own volcano! Find resources to learn more about volcano warning signs and eruptions, on our website at www.sciencepodcastforkids.com We have more from our interview with Helena Buurman for our Patrons who pledge just $1/month or more. To listen, pledge today at patreon.com/tumblepodcast. For more volcano episodes, check out one of our favorites: “What Would Earth Be Like If Volcanoes Didn’t Exist?”
What happened when astronomers discovered the first alien from another solar system? This is a true story! In 2017, a telescope in Hawaii spotted a distant object in the night sky, behaving like nothing we’d ever seen before. They named it ‘Oumuamua, and an astronomical chase began! Join astronomer Jane Luu on her quest to track it down and figure out how the first interstellar visitor arrived in our solar system. We have another great episode with Jane Luu, about her breakthrough discovery of the Kuiper Belt! Listen to The Search at the Edge of the Solar System. You can also listen to an extended interview with Jane Luu about Oumuamua when you pledge to support Tumble on our Patreon, for just $1/month. Learn more about ‘Oumuamua on the blog on our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
We’re back with a new set of kids’ questions about COVID19, as well as some important updates on questions from our first coronavirus episode. Dr. Juan Dumois, infectious disease pediatrician, answers some tricky questions like, “If you were the coronavirus, what would life feel like?” and “Can I play with my friend?”  * *Our interview with Dr. Dumois was recorded on April 17, 2020. If you’re listening weeks later, the situation and the science might have evolved, and Dr. Dumois’ answers might be outdated - information that feels old or incorrect. In that case, look for more recently updated information from trusted sources, like the Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization, and follow guidelines from your local government. You can also keep sending us questions at tumblepodcast@gmail.com! Do you love Tumble? Support us on Patreon.com/tumblepodcast with a pledge! Find more information about some of the answers in this episode at our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
The Science of Smell

The Science of Smell

2020-04-1713:12

Why do foods smell the way that they do? A would-be chef goes on a quest to find out, after she loses the ability to smell. Molly Birnbaum, editor of America’s Test Kitchen Kids and host of the podcast, Mystery Recipe, navigates us through the olfactory organs and the startling chemistry of food. Join us to discover the science of smell, and how your nose helps you cook and taste. Want to hear more from our interview with Molly? We have a special bonus interview episode available to all our patrons! Just pledge $1 or more a month at patreon.com/tumblepodcast. We’re sharing more resources about the science of smell and cooking on our blog at our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com. 
Los virus son como los ninjas más pequeños del planeta. Tienen infinidad de trucos y misterios. ¿Cómo adquieren los animales los virus y cómo se lo pasan a los humanos? Esa era la pregunta de uno de nuestros oyentes. Para averiguar la respuesta, nos adentramos en la ciencia de la virología, el estudio de los virus. El Dr. Jasdave Chahal es un virólogo y nos explica cómo el coronavirus saltó por dos especies hasta los humanos, y de dónde salió. Además, averiguamos cómo los científicos descubrieron los virus aún antes de poder verlos, y cómo cómo crearon las herramientas para protegernos de estos sigilosos ninjas. Esta es una versión especial en español de Tumble, producida por Nuria Net y Alex García de La Coctelera Music. ¡Gracias a todos los que ayudaron con este episodio! Para más recursos (en inglés) sobre el coronavirus visita nuestra página web, sciencepodcastforkids.com. También te puede interesar este episodio con las preguntas de nuestros oyentes: Coronavirus: Preguntas y Respuestas para Niños y este otro episodio sobre los virus y las vacunas (en inglés): The Sign of the Ninja Virus. 
How do animals get viruses to pass on to humans? That’s what listener Ian wanted to know. To find out, we’re exploring the science of virology - the study of viruses. Virologist Dr. Jasdave Chahal explains how coronavirus jumped through two species into humans, and where they came from in the first place. Plus, we’ll find out how scientists discovered viruses before even seeing them, and how they built the tools to fight back. We have more virology resources on the blog for this episode on our website, www.sciencepodcastforkids.com. Want to hear more from our interview with Jasdave? We have a bonus interview episode available for Patreons, when you pledge $1/month or more at patreon.com/tumblepodcast. Do you have questions about coronavirus? Send them to us at tumblepodcast@gmail.com. Correction: A previous version of this episode stated that viruses were first discovered in rabies. They were discovered in tobacco mosaic virus. The new version makes the correction that viruses were first hypothesized in rabies, but discovered later in tobacco plants.
Si tienes preguntas sobre el coronavirus, tenemos las respuestas. El coronavirus nos está afectando a todos y puede parecer peligroso y difícil de entender. Por esta razón, Tumble reunió preguntas de sus oyentes y contactó con un experto para responderlas. Le preguntamos al Dr. Juan Dumois, un médico pediátrico de enfermedades infecciosas, lo que todos nos estamos preguntando, especialmente los niños:**** He escuchado que el coronavirus empezó con unos murciélagos y quería saber si esto es cierto. Y si fue así, ¿qué pasó?  ¿De dónde proviene el nombre del coronavirus? ¿Cómo se transmite el coronavirus de persona en persona? ¿Por qué el coronavirus parece ser más peligroso para la gente mayor que para los niños? ¿Puedo darle besos y abrazos a mi abuela? ¿Le puede dar coronavirus a mi mascota? ¿Cómo puede la ciencia ayudar a frenar este brote? Esta es una versión especial en español de Tumble, producida por Nuria Net y Alex García de La Coctelera Music. ¡Gracias a todos los que ayudaron con este episodio! Para más recursos (en inglés) sobre el coronavirus visita nuestra página web, sciencepodcastforkids.com. También te puede interesar este episodio sobre los virus y las vacunas (en inglés): The Sign of the Ninja Virus.  Si estás buscando actividades, también tenemos materiales educativos para acompañar algunos de nuestros episodios. Si utilizas el código COVID, puedes descargarlos de forma gratuita durante la cuarentena del coronavirus. Solo tienes que ir a “Teacher Store” en nuestra página web y poner COVID al finalizar la compra.  Esperamos que este episodio especial te ayude a entender el coronavirus desde un punto de vista científico y que durante estos tiempos inciertos, ayude a los niños y a sus familias a proteger a sus seres queridos más susceptibles.
**Evidence about behavior and contagion has evolved since this podcast was released. Please refer to current reporting from trusted sources like Stat News for updated information about coronavirus.** Do you have questions about coronavirus? We’ve got answers. Coronavirus is probably affecting your life right now, and it can seem scary and complicated to understand. That’s why we collected questions from listeners, and got an expert to answer them. We asked Dr. Juan Dumois, an infectious disease pediatrician, these questions and more: Did coronavirus really originate from bats, because that’s what I heard? If so, how did it happen? How did coronavirus get its name? How does coronavirus travel to different people? Why does coronavirus seem more dangerous for the elderly than it is for kids? Can I still hug and kiss my grandma? Can my pet get coronavirus? What will it take to end the outbreak? How can science help? Thanks to everyone who contributed to this episode! We’ll have more resources for kids about coronavirus on our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com. You might also want to listen to our episode about viruses and vaccines: The Sign of the Ninja Virus. If you’re looking for activities, we also have educational materials to go along with some of our episodes. We are making them free during the coronavirus outbreak with the code COVID. Just go to our “Teacher Store” on our website and enter COVID at checkout. We hope this special episode helps you understand the science behind the coronavirus, and how kids and families can help keep vulnerable people safe during this uncertain time.
Can science make you better at sports? Sports scientist John Drazan says the answer is yes. John shares how losing a high school basketball game made him start thinking like a scientist. His high school physics teacher stepped in to explain how an idea called “mechanical advantage” could have saved the last point of the game - and changed his life forever. Join us to hear John’s aha moment, and hear his tips on how science can make you better at the things you love to do.  Want to hear more about sports and science? We have a bonus interview episode with John, where he shares how he used physics to learn how to dunk. You can listen to this and all our other scientist interview episodes when you pledge just $1/month on patreon, at patreon.com/tumblepodcast We have some great resources on science and sports available on the blog on our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
What’s it like to be a kid doing experiments in one of the most famous science places in the world? Oscar and Mae Johnson were nine and twelve when they traveled to the Galapagos Islands with their scientist dad. The Galapagos are isolated tropical islands made famous by Charles Darwin, who came up with the theory of evolution based on his research there. Mae and Oscar followed in Darwin’s footsteps. With help from their parents, they conducted their own research and got it published in a scientific journal - a big deal for scientists of every age! Hear Mae and Oscar tell their own story of science discovery in this episode. See photos of Oscar and Mae doing their experiment on our blog at sciencepodcastforkids.com! We also have more resources to learn about the Galapagos there. Want to learn more about Mae and Oscar’s great science adventure and experiments? We have a special bonus interview episode available for our Patrons. Just pledge $1/month for this and all our scientist interviews at patreon.com/tumblepodcast.
Decoding Dog DNA

Decoding Dog DNA

2020-02-0717:09

Why do dogs look and act so different from each other? Listener Finley has two Chihuahuas named Peanut and Maggie, and she wants to know why they have different head shapes. She thinks it might have something to do with their DNA. It turns out scientists are studying what makes dogs the way they are, with the help of gigantic books of doggie DNA. Geneticist Jessica Hekman takes us on a journey through the history of dog breeding and into the cutting-edge science that’s helping us understand what makes our pups so special. Come explore genetics through dog breeds! Learn more about dog breeds and behavior in our interview with Jessica Hekman, available to our Patreon supporters! To get access with a pledge of just $1/month and up, go to patreon.com/tumblepodcast. Get more information about dog genetics and Darwin’s Ark on the blog post on our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
Tumble has won a big award for two episodes: “The Cave of the Underground Astronauts” and “The Science of Whiskers.” You’ll hear them both in this twin pack of awesome stories of science discovery.  Tumble is the 2019 Gold Award winner of the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, in the category of Children’s Science News. It’s an international prize that “recognizes distinguished science reporting for a general audience.”   “The originality and creativity that went into these two pieces is remarkable,” said Christine Dell’Amore, a *National Geographic *editor. “These podcasts taught kids a ton about science in a fun and engaging way.”  Lindsay will be traveling to Seattle in February to receive the awards, and give a free public talk about how to make science podcasts, for both kids and adults! If you’re in the Seattle area, come to her “Meet a Scientist” talk on February 15 at 12 pm. She’d love to meet you!  The talk is part of AAAS Family Days - a weekend filled with science activities at the Seattle Sheraton Grand Hotel. It’s free to attend on February 15 and 16. More information and registration link here.
Tumble is on winter break! In the meantime, enjoy this episode from our friends at But Why?: A Podcast for Curious Kids. We know that our listeners are some of the most curious kids on the planet, so you’re sure to love it. If you enjoy this episode, check out over 100 more episodes by subscribing to But Why? wherever you get your podcasts. Tumble will be back with all new episodes on February 7. We can’t wait to share what we’ve been working on!
Tumble is on winter break! In the meantime, enjoy this bonus-size pack of science from our friends at Fun Kids Science Weekly. In this British podcast, Dan takes a look at the week’s best science stories. And they gave us the year’s best stories, all rolled up into one giant episode! Enjoy while you travel, and find out more about the show on FunKidsLive.com.  Tumble will be back with all new episodes on February 7. While you travel, enjoy our road trip compilations: The Animal Road Trip Adventure, The Road Trip to Outer Space, and The Explorer’s Road Trip.  Happy New Year, from all of us at Tumble!
How do you become an astronaut? That’s what Tumble listener Margaret wants to know. We go straight to the source to get an answer: A NASA astronaut! Dr. Serena Auñon-Chancellor shares her journey to outer space with us. Starting from being a kid watching shuttle launches, to her school’s Astronaut Club, all the way to NASA’s Astronaut Candidate program, and finally to the International Space Station. Serena also shares the surprising truth about doing science research in space. Join us on her path to the stars! Want to hear more from our interview with Serena about training to become an astronaut? Listen to our special bonus interview episode. It’s available when you pledge just $1/month on Patreon! patreon.com/tumblepodcast We have resources to learn more about Serena and the NASA astronaut training program on the blog on our website, sciencepodcastforkids.com.
The Science of Snot

The Science of Snot

2019-11-2916:461

Why do we have snot? Do animals get stuffy noses, too? We delve into the world of thick secretions with the help of Dani Rabiaotti, zoologist and author of “Believe it or Snot: The Definitive Field Guide to Earth’s Slimy Creatures.” You’ll find out why we make so much mucus, and meet the slimiest animals on the planet. Plus, you’ll discover why scientists study slime, even though it’s super gross. Want buckets more of slime info? We’ve got a BONUS EPISODE with Dani Rabiaotti! You can listen to our scientist interview (and many more!) when you pledge just $1/month or more to support Tumble on Patreon, at patreon.com/tumblepodcast. Learn more about slimey topics covered in the show on our blog, at sciencepodcastforkids.com.
“What’s the oldest dinosaur?” “How did dinosaurs come alive?” We tackle two listener questions in one epic story of dinosaur domination. Scientist Jessica Whiteside takes us back in time to the dawn of the dinosaurs, 230 million years ago. The story involves fascinating fossils, intense lava eruptions, climate craziness, and dinosaurs doubling in size. We’re going to find out what happened, and how scientists discovered it all. Hear more from our interview with Jessica Whiteside and discover the bizarre ancestor of the dinosaurs! You can listen to our bonus episode (and many more!) when you pledge just $1/month or more to support Tumble on Patreon, at patreon.com/tumblepodcast. Learn more about dino-tastic topics covered in the show on our blog, at sciencepodcastforkids.com.
loading
Comments (11)

Holls Balls

A kids podcast that says god dammit, ummm

Dec 28th
Reply

assaf bester

I can't watch the podcast 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

Jun 29th
Reply (1)

Kiah Ashley

I love this podcast. This podcast is literally the best.

May 22nd
Reply

Mister Spoon

amazing

Dec 2nd
Reply

Wyatt Pastoor Price

good episode

Jun 8th
Reply

Max Michael Hatling

Hi i love this podcast

May 11th
Reply

MB Chandler

Ridiculous amount of advertising

Nov 10th
Reply

iTunes User

I love the banter between hosts and that they make science topics so accessible for kids (and adults!) Looking forward to hearing more!

Aug 31st
Reply

iTunes User

Great new podcast for kids, focusing on science. Really creative editing and good stories elevate this over other straight interview type shows. This is created thoughtfully, with a really emphasis placed on story telling. Short and easy to understand for the younger crowd. Both my 5 and 10 year olds got a lot out of the shows so far.

Aug 31st
Reply

iTunes User

My 6 and 8 year old loooove this. We're looking forward to the new episodes!

Aug 31st
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store