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UnTextbooked | A history podcast for the future
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UnTextbooked | A history podcast for the future

Author: The History Co:Lab and Pod People

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UnTextbooked is brought to you by teen change-makers who are looking for answers to big questions. Have you ever wondered if protests really can save lives, why assimilation required Native American kids to attend boarding schools, how Black-led organizations for mutual aid began, how the fear of communism led the United States to plan the overthrows of many leaders in Latin America, or why Brazilian cars run on sugar? Or maybe you've questioned when Asian Americans will stop being seen as "perpetual foreigners," how African heritage influences Black activism, or what resilience looks like for Iranian women? 


Your textbooks probably didn't teach you how American Jews were an integral part of the Civil Rights Movement, if history’s greatest leaders were generalists or specialists, how a Black teenager and his young lawyer changed America’s criminal justice system, or if either the US or the USSR won the Cold War. Did you know some of the forgotten BIPOC women of history were spying in aid of the French Resistance, that there's more to being a leader than going down with your battleship, or that there is a long history of gender expression in Native American cultures that goes beyond the male/female binary? Listen in as we interview famous authors and historians who have the answers. 


Context is the key to understanding topics like British imperialism, segregation, racism, criminal justice, identifying as non-binary and so much more. These intergenerational conversations bring the full power of history to you with the depth and vividness that most textbooks lack. Real history, to help you find answers to your big questions. UnTextbooked makes history unboring forever.

73 Episodes
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In honor of Women’s History Month, we are sharing a special bonus episode featuring Chicana activist and artist Irma Lerma Barbosa. Her legacy will be preserved for years to come in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History Collections. Irma attended college at a time when the Chicano movement was just gaining momentum – and she jumped right into fighting for her community. Picture this – a legacy that includes being welcomed into Cesar Chavez's family home through her time in the United Farm Workers Movement, leadership with the Brown Berets, spearheading a free breakfast program to help her community, and eventually founding her own woman-led arts collective. Listen to our first episode with Irma Lerma Barbosa and Smithsonian Curator Veronica Mendez here.  Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Introduction to Irma Lerma Barbosa, Chicano Movement, and Royal Chicano Air Force (3:42) - Being a Woman in Male-dominated Spaces (5:45) - Irma’s Place in History (7:04) - RCAF Women’s Mural named “Women Hold Up Half the Sky” (9:18) - Art as a Tool for Activism (10:47) - Co-Madres Artistas (13:30) - Standing Up Against Sexual Harassment (15:13) - Feeling Freedom with Art (15:58) - Closing Thoughts
In honor of Black History Month, Untextbooked is sharing a favorite episode from our archive. Women of color have been at the forefront of many movements, yet are often neglected, demonized, or ignored. Your history class probably didn’t teach you about Josephine Baker, who was not only a famous Black dancer and entertainer, but also a spy aiding in the French Resistance. You likely didn’t learn about Claudette Colvin either. She was the Black, pregnant fifteen year old whose civil disobedience kicked off the Montgomery Bus Boycott. We live in a world of whitewashed feminism, so there’s a lot to unlearn before our social movements are truly inclusive.  Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists by Mikki Kendall shares the stories of notable women of color whose stories have been left behind. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.
In honor of Black History Month, UnTextbooked is sharing a favorite episode from our archive.  UnTextbooked producer Sydne Clarke thinks that African American history is often oversimplified or overlooked. Often that history is taught as things that happened to African Americans. We don’t often hear about the ways in which African Americans fought for and took care of themselves.  Dr. Leslie Alexander studies Black resistance movements, particularly in America. In her research Dr. Alexander has discovered communities and people who were vital to Black activism, but are often forgotten in re-telling African American history. On this episode of UnTextbooked, Sydne interviews Dr. Alexander about her book African or American? Black Identity and Political Activism in New York City, 1784-1861. They talk about the creation of Black-led organizations for mutual aid, and about how African heritage influenced Black activism then and now. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.
In 2008, Anonymous posted a video declaring war against Scientology. Some people flocked to join the hacker collective while corporations started re-evaluating their security protocols. This week on Untextbooked, producer Caroline Somers dives into the history of the hacker collective and asks what can we learn about internet activism.  Gabriella Coleman is the author of “Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous”. She is a full professor in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. She is the founder and editor of Hack_Curio, a video portal into the cultures of hacking. In 2022, she hosted the BBC4 radio and podcast series, The Hackers.  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Anonymous’s First Video  (1:42) - Introduction to Anthropologist Gabriella Coleman (3:18) - The Origins of Anonymous (4:25) - How did Anonymous Organize Hacks? (7:39) - Why did People Get Involved with Anonymous? (9:11) - Pseudonymous Names & Illegal Activity (12:02) - Trolling Culture & Chat Logs (14:56) - Anonymous Hacks & Leaks (19:35) - Phineas Fisher and Guayacama (21:59) - Reflections & Takeaways
In 1963, Betty Friedan’s book The Feminine Mystique was a galvanizing force for the Feminist movement. Now, nearly six decades later, feminist discourse has gone through several evolutions, Betty Friedan is no longer a household name, and her radical ideas don’t sound so radical anymore. This week, Producer Gavin Scott sits down with Rachel Shteir, author of “Betty Friedan: Magnificent Disrupter”, to talk about the legacy and controversy around Betty Friedan, including how she coined the term ‘Lavender Menace.’ Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Who is Betty Friedan? (1:35) - Why did the Feminine Mystique resonate? (4:51) - Critiques of the Feminine Mystique (6:25) - Creating the National Organization of Women (NOW) (7:26) - Betty Friedan’s Early Life (9:12) - Betty Friedan’s Perspective on Women’s Rights (10:45) - The “Lavender Menace” (12:18) - Marriage and Domestic Abuse (15:25) - Legacy & Impact (16:45) - Gavin’s closing thoughts
What does it mean to belong in the American imagination? That’s one question we explore on this week’s episode of UnTextbooked. In another installment of “UnTextbooking the Museum Collections”, we dive into the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History exhibit named “Mirror Mirror: Disney theme parks and American stories”. Producer Victor Ye speaks with original Disney Imagineer Bob Gurr about working with Walt Disney, designing original Disney rides, and queer identity. Smithsonian Curator Bethanee Bemis shares how Walt Disneyland is a microcosm of the American dream.   Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Mirror, Mirror: Disney Theme Parks and American Stories (4:29) - Bob Gurr, Original Disney Imagineer (9:29) - Bob Gurr on Designing the Monorail (14:44) - Bethanee Bemis on Disneyland and American Values (18:25) - Splash Mountain & Song of the South (21:07) - “Gay Days” at Disney Parks (25:33) - Being Gay as an Early Disney Employee (27:00) - Bob Gurr on the Disney Omnibus for Pride (31:17) - Iconic Disney Ears (34:34) - Reflections & Legacy
UnTextbooked is back with a new episode in our series, “UnTextbooking the Museum Collections.” We're sharing the untold story of Irma Lerma Barbosa, a Chicana activist and artist whose work will be preserved for years to come in the National Museum of American History's Collections. Curator Veronica Mendez tells us how this acquisition came to be and why it’s historically significant in telling the long history of the Latina/o Civil Rights Movement Irma attended college at a time when the Chicano movement was just gaining momentum – and she jumped right into fighting for her community. Picture this – a legacy that includes being welcomed into Cesar Chavez's family home through her time in the United Farm Workers Movement, leadership with the Brown Berets, spearheading a free breakfast program to help her community, and eventually founding her own woman-led arts collective. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Introduction to Irma Lerma Barbosa (3:06) - Veronica Mendez, Smithsonian Curator (4:25) - Irma’s early life & joining Brown Berets (8:14) - What is the Chicano Movement? (10:41) - Connection to the Black Panthers (13:04) - Smithsonian Acquisition (15:01) - Brown Berets Flag (20:15) - Royal Chicano Air Force (24:38) - Irma’s Place in History & Gender (30:49) - What Sustains Political Movements? (34:13) - What’s Special About Youth Activism? (38:53) - Outro
In this new miniseries we’re calling “UnTextbooking the Museum Collections,” we dive into the vast collections of the Smithsonian, the world’s largest museum complex, made up of  21 museums and the National Zoological Park, as well as research facilities. This week, producer Jenny Fan talks with curator Katherine Ott, PhD, about curating medical history at the National Museum of American History. They talk about skin – the cultural lens we view medical diagnoses, the evolution of studying skin, and why early dermatologists were obsessed with syphilis. Plus, why does the Smithsonian have 150-year-old feces in its collection?  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes:  00:00 - Introducing the “Untextbooking the Museum Collections” 2:18 - What does Dr. Katherine Ott research? 5:47 - History of skin and field of dermatology 9:57 - Early skin treatments & Syphilis 11:11 -  Jean-Louis-Marc Alibert 16:36 - Dr. Albert Kligman & Prison Experiments 20:51 - How does a Smithsonian curator select what’s in an exhibit? 27:05 - Takeaways & Reflections
This week, we are revisiting an important question: Is our democracy in danger? In the years after Trump’s presidency, it’s tempting to say “not anymore,” but nowadays threats to democracy are no longer as obvious as a military coup or revolution. Instead, a democracy in danger manifests in much more subtle ways including: the steady decline of longstanding political norms and weakening of essential institutions such as the United States press and its courts system, both of which are already in jeopardy. On this episode of UnTextbooked, producer Jessica Chiriboga interviews New York Times best-selling author, Professor Daniel Ziblatt to discuss how to spot the signs of a dying democracy and how American democracy might be salvaged. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.
In 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, police killed unarmed 17-year-old Bobby Hutton, and Aaron Dixon decided it was time to join the Black Panther Party. Aaron Dixon was co-founder and Captain of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panther Party. As a college student at the University of Washington, Dixon played a key role in the formation of the Black Student Union (BSU) and the Seattle Chapter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In the spring of 1968, at the funeral of Bobby Hutton in Oakland, California, Dixon met Bobby Seale and later was appointed Captain of Seattle’s Black Panther Party, the first chapter outside of Oakland. He was 19 years old. Dixon led the chapter through its first four years, then moved to Party national headquarters in Oakland in 1972. There he worked with Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, and served for a time as bodyguard to Elaine Brown.  Aaron Dixon’s  autobiography is titled “My People Are Rising: Memoir of a Black Panther Party Captain” (2012).   Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms. Show Notes:  00:00 - Who Were the Black Panthers? 1:39 - Why did Aaron Dixon Join the Black Panthers?  4:27 - Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.  6:06 - Little Bobby Hutton’s Death and Funeral  8:21 - Starting the Seattle Chapter  12:12 - Black Liberation & Rainbow Coalition  14:45 - COINTELPRO & “Enemy Number One” 16:32 - Assassination Attempts on Aaron Dixon’s Life  20:38 - Chicago Leader Fred Hampton’s Assassination 24:46 - Aaron Dixon’s Revolutionary Legacy  28:00 - Reflections
Thousands of protestors joined Indigenous activists at Standing Rock to fight for clean drinking water. At its core, this fight echoes the legacy of broken treaties and settler industrialization. Producer Lily Sones talks with Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) about how industrialization halted traditional indigenous food ways and how extractive industries cause health effects across today’s indigenous communities.  Dina Gilio-Whitaker is an award-winning journalist and columnist. She is a lecturer of American Indian Studies at California State University San Marcos, and independent consultant and educator on environmental justice and other Indigenous policy-related issues. She is the author of "As Long As Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice from Colonization to Standing Rock" and co-author with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz of "'All the Real Indians Died Off' and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans." She lives in San Clemente, California. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - Standing Rock Protests  (2:47) - Legacy of Broken Treaties  (6:06) - Settler Agricultural Complex & Eradication of Buffalo  (7:55) - Consequences of Industrialization  (12:14) - European vs Indigenous Ideas of Wilderness (14:48) - The Modern Environmental Movement & Indigenous Activism  (16:52) - Uranium Mining on Indigenous Lands (21:22) - Women of All Red Nations (23:51) - ‘Green Colonialism,’ Lithium Production, And What’s Changed Since Standing Rock?  (26:19) - Extractive Industry & Future of Society  (28:11) - Outro
The clothes we wear say a lot about how we express ourselves. But an investigation into how these clothes ended up in our closets reveals a complex history dating back 400 years ago at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Producer Ashley Kim sits down with Sofi Thanhauser, the author of “Worn: A People’s History of Clothing” to learn how clothing can teach us about economics, gender and imperialism.  Sofi Thanhauser teaches in the writing department at Pratt Institute. She has received fellowships from the Fulbright Program, MacDowell, and Ucross Foundation. Her writing has appeared in Vox, Essay Daily, and The Establishment, among other publications. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - What History Can You Find in a Thrift Store? (01:54) - The History of Clothing is Intertwined with Economics (04:40) - How the Clothing Industry Became Global (06:16) - Gender and Clothing Manufacturing (14:05) - Safety on the Factory Floor (17:31) - Being an Ethical Consumer (21:02) - Will Clothes Ever be Local Again? (22:29) - Outro
Spoken word poetry is an oral tradition dating back centuries. So why is this form of poetry not always taken seriously? Producer Sydne Clarke sits down with Dr. Joshua Bennett, the author of "Spoken Word: A Cultural History". His nonfiction debut is a personal investigation into the history of spoken word, specifically the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. This is a cultural hub that started in the Lower East Side living room of Miguel Algarin.  Bennett has authored several books of poetry, including  The Sobbing School, which was a National Poetry Series selection and a finalist for an NAACP Image Award. He has received fellowships and awards from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Society of Fellows at Harvard University. He is a Professor of Literature and Distinguished Chair of the Humanities at MIT.  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes: (00:00) - What is Spoken Word Poetry? (2:14) - Nuyorican Poetry (6:41) - Saul Williams (10:24) - Inspiration and Representation (14:36) - Is Slam Poetry the “Death of Art?”  (21:49) - Advice to Young Poets (23:47) - Outro
In World War One, millions of soldiers saw industrial warfare unlike anything they’ve seen before: artillery shells, flame throwers, poison gas. Those who saw the war on the frontlines came home with psychological wounds the world had never quite seen before. At one military hospital in Scotland named Craiglockhart, early psychiatrists treat PTSD and soldiers turn to poetry and brotherhood to heal.  UnTextbooked producer Faith Stanley sits down to talk with journalist and author Charles Glass. His recent book “Soldiers Don't Go Mad” is a comprehensive history of the Craiglockhart Military Hospital and the now famous poets to have come through its doors. Glass has also written “Americans in Paris”, “Tribes with Flags”, and “The Northern Front: An Iraq War Diary”, among other books. He divides his time among the south of France, Tuscany, London, and the Middle East. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show Notes:  (00:00) - World War One & Psychological Toll  (02:57) - Craiglockhart Military Psychiatric Hospital  (3:35) - Dr. William Halse Rivers and Dr. Arthur Brock  (6:25) - Literary Journal “The Hydra” and Poet Wilfred Owen (9:25) - War Poet Siegfried Sassoon  (13:13) - The Role of Psychiatrists in War  (15:18) - Brotherhood and Poetry (18:31) - Outro
Entrepreneurs like Elon Musk and products like Chat GPT have been fueled by Venture Capital. In fact, some argue that Venture Capital has shaped our modern technology more than any other entity. But what is Venture Capital and what makes it unique?  This week, UnTextbooked producer and college student Oliver Wang talks to author Sebastian Mallaby to learn about the shadow history of venture capital. What once started as a way to liberate eight scientists from a difficult boss now is a medium to inspire innovation across the world. Sebastian Mallaby is the author of “The Power Law: Venture Capital and the Making of the New Future”. He is a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, Amazon Music, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Learn more about the podcast at UnTextbooked.com.  Show notes:  (0:00) - What is Venture Capital?  (4:13) - Arthur Rock and the Origins of Fairchild Semiconductor (9:36) - What makes Venture Capital Unique (12:24) - The Power Law and Risks in Venture Capital  (16:23) - Flaws in Venture Capital, Bubbles, and Disruption (20:19) - Venture Capital Investments in China (24:16) - Outro
J. Edgar Hoover was a man of contradictions. As the Director of the FBI from 1924 to 1972, he spearheaded homophobic, racist, and anti-communist policies – which arguably shaped half a century of the United States. But he also had an intimate personal relationship with a man and he believed in the role of government to support social conservatism.  Beverly Gage is the author of “G-Man: J. Edgar Hoover and the Making of the American Century”, which won a Pulitzer Prize in Biography. She is a 20th-century American historian at Yale. She also wrote “The Day Wall Street Exploded” which examined the history of terrorism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, Amazon Music or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Visit UnTextbooked.com for learning resources including a glossary of terms.  Show notes:  (0:00) - Who is J. Edgar Hoover? (1:54) - Intimate Relationship with Clyde Tolson (3:17) - The Lavender Scare and Government  (6:16) - Early Years and Racist Fraternity (8:04) - FBI surveilling Civil Rights Movement Leaders (10:58) - Impact of Anti Communism and McCarthyism  (14:30) - Social Conservatism and Big Government (16:50) - Process of Writing Biography  (20:39) - An “Incredibly Honest” Paper Trail (22:31) - Legacy and Impact  (23:55) - Reflection
Women including Ida B. Wells and Nellie Bly were on the front edge of investigative journalism in the 1800s. But even with these historical trailblazers, why were women excluded from reporting hard news until recent history?  Producer Jordan Pettiford sits down with author, journalist and professor Brooke Kroeger to find out. Brooke has authored six books and her most recent book is “Undaunted: How Women Changed American Journalism”.  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, Amazon Music, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Learn more about the podcast at UnTextbooked.com.  Show Notes:  (00:00) - Introduction  (1:08) - Who is Ida B. Wells? (2:08) - Journalist Nellie Bly and the Insane Asylum  (6:04) - Women Journalists & ‘Stunt Work’ (8:03) - Ida B. Wells’ Entry Into Journalism (10:05) - Ida B. Wells & Lynching Investigations  (11:24) - ‘Sob Sisters’ and ‘Front Page Girls’ of the 1920s  (12:48) - Women as War Correspondents  (14:43) - Impact of The Civil Rights Act of 1964  (18:18) - Scrutiny Women Face in Broadcast Journalism  (20:46) - Female Executive Editors at Top News Organizations (23:13) - Brooke Kroeger’s Advice for Young Journalists (26:27) - Reflections
From banned books to freedom of speech in academic settings, censorship is a topic that affects the everyday lives of young people.  This week, UnTextbooked producer and college student Karly Shepherd talks to Eric Berkowitz, human rights lawyer, journalist and author. His latest book “Dangerous Ideas: A Brief History of Censorship from the Ancients to Fake News” covers about 2,000 years of censorship history. Censorship has existed since the dawn of language, consistently targeting themes like sex, religion and politics. But why does censorship exist? And does censorship even work?  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, Amazon Music, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Learn more about the podcast at UnTextbooked.com.  Show notes:  (00:00) - What can London Drill Music have to do with Censorship? (02:00) - China’s first emperor Qin Shi Huang  (07:11) - Limits of Free Speech in Athens and Ancient Greece (13:58) - The Comstock Act and Censorship (15:34) - Social Media, The Supreme Court and Freedom of Speech Today (24:06) - Why Censorship Never Works
This season, we talk to an original member of the Black Panther Party. We explore the extremely contradictory life of longtime FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. We talk to Smithsonian curators about the historical connection of Disneyland to American identity. Plus, we cover topics including censorship, fast fashion, women in journalism, PTSD, Internet hackers, and more.  History is full of gems to discover and pitfalls to avoid. But you wouldn’t know it when sitting in a high school history class. That’s why we created UnTextbooked, a history podcast for the future. We’re a group of high school and college students from across the country. We're here to show young people that history is more than just what we learn in schools. It's exciting, scary, creative, nuanced and surprising.  Listen to new episodes every Thursday. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Consider writing us a review on your podcast app or telling a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Learn more about the podcast at UnTextbooked.com.
UnTextbooked heads to sunny San Diego, California, for the ASU+GSV Summit and we brought our microphones with us! Host Gabe Hostin and founding producer Victor Ye talked to innovative EdTech leaders, teachers and social entrepreneurs to discuss how we can collaboratively write a new chapter in the history of education. Plus, they ask the question, what else do we need to unlearn?  This week’s guests:  Steven Hernandez, ESQ, Executive Director for the Connecticut Commission on Women, Children and Seniors. Esther Wojcicki, Teacher, Author, and Founder of Palo Alto High School’s Media Arts Program David Adams, CEO of The Urban Assembly Gregg Behr, Founder & Co-chair of Remake Learning and Executive Director of The Grable Foundation Kim Smith, Innovator, Serial Social Entrepreneur and Founding Team Member of Teach For America UnTextbooked is a history podcast for the future. Listen to new episodes every Thursday starting October 19th. Follow the show on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen. That way you never miss an episode.  Love the show? Write us a review on your podcast app or tell a friend about the show. This really helps us spread the word.  Learn more about the podcast at UnTextbooked.com.
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