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Infectious Groove Podcast

Infectious Groove Podcast

Author: OddPods Media Network

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We love music. You love music. Let's talk about it. From current events, crazy show stories, what we're currently listening to, and anything else that is on our minds—there may even be a special guest on to answer all of your burning questions.

The only way to know is to tune in weekly and find out.
101 Episodes
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The number 100 can be looked at as a milestone in many facets. Live to 100, and not only are you old as dirt, but you've most likely outlived most of the people you came up with throughout your life—which might seem depressing, and sad but that really is quite an amazing accomplishment. You're also part of a very special club of people that hit that milestone. When you're nine years old, $100 feels like a million, and then you grow up and that same $100 feels like $1 because the other $99 is keeping you alive—but that feeling you had as a kid was priceless. Hit the highway and when you realize there is no traffic you put the pedal to the medal. When you get to 100 mph and fly past that speed limit sign, you feel like a million bucks. Little do you know, there is a speed trap up ahead. As soon as you see the cop car, you slam on the brakes but you know there is no way you're not done for. You coast by only to realize the cop that would love to give you that nice fat speeding ticket, is preoccupied with taking a nap and you're in the clear (though potentially fun, this scenario is not recommended). In the podcasting community making it to 100 episodes is quite the feat. With over 2 million podcasts out there clogging up your internet connection, many don't make it anywhere near recording 100 episodes. This happens for many reasons, and quite simply put, podcasting just isn't for everyone, and that's okay. As we started approaching this milestone, we knew we had to put something together that would give back to our listeners and supporters. You guys always hear about what makes music so special to the three of us, but we wanted to be able to hear from all of you. We asked for clips of you telling everyone about an artist or album that greatly impacted your lives, and that is exactly what you gave us. With so many clips in hand, we've split this episode in two, for twice the fun. This is part 2, of a 2 part series made up entirely of you, our listeners, and supporters. Without you, there would be no podcast, and there surely wouldn't be 100 episodes in the can. It's with true gratitude and love from the bottom of our hearts that we say thank you. Thank you for making this possible, and thank you for allowing us to hit this milestone with all of you in tow. It's season 4, episode 16 of what we hope becomes everyone's favorite music podcast. Here's to the next 100. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
The number 100 can be looked at as a milestone in many facets. Live to 100, and not only are you old as dirt, but you've most likely outlived most of the people you came up with throughout your life—which might seem depressing, and sad but that really is quite an amazing accomplishment. You're also part of a very special club of people that hit that milestone. When you're nine years old, $100 feels like a million, and then you grow up and that same $100 feels like $1 because the other $99 is keeping you alive—but that feeling you had as a kid was priceless. Hit the highway and when you realize there is no traffic you put the pedal to the medal. When you get to 100 mph and fly past that speed limit sign, you feel like a million bucks. Little do you know, there is a speed trap up ahead. As soon as you see the cop car, you slam on the brakes but you know there is no way you're not done for. You coast by only to realize the cop that would love to give you that nice fat speeding ticket, is preoccupied with taking a nap and you're in the clear (though potentially fun, this scenario is not recommended). In the podcasting community making it to 100 episodes is quite the feat. With over 2 million podcasts out there clogging up your internet connection, many don't make it anywhere near recording 100 episodes. This happens for many reasons, and quite simply put, podcasting just isn't for everyone, and that's okay. As we started approaching this milestone, we knew we had to put something together that would give back to our listeners and supporters. You guys always hear about what makes music so special to the three of us, but we wanted to be able to hear from all of you. We asked for clips of you telling everyone about an artist or album that greatly impacted your lives, and that is exactly what you gave us. With so many clips in hand, we've split this episode in two, for twice the fun. This is part 1, of a 2 part series made up entirely of you, our listeners, and supporters. Without you, there would be no podcast, and there surely wouldn't be 100 episodes in the can. It's with true gratitude and love from the bottom of our hearts that we say thank you. Thank you for making this possible, and thank you for allowing us to hit this milestone with all of you in tow. It's season 4, episode 15 of what we hope becomes everyone's favorite music podcast. Here's to the next 100. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
lon·gev·i·tynoun - long life."the greater longevity of women compared with men" - long existence or service."her longevity in office now appeared as a handicap to the party" Longevity used to be the goal when it came to making it big in the music business, but with a growing industry that has gained much-needed independence from all of the overlord record labels, putting in years and years of work to stay relevant seems like a thing of the past. But what if someone's goal was to come in, get big, make a bunch of money and then cash out and call it a day? Certainly, that would line up with the agenda of an unwanted record label that needs to stay relevant. All they have to do is appear to be offering exactly what someone is looking for, then both parties have something to gain in the deal.Opposite of that, there are artists out there that have been around for what seems like forever. Many of which don't even release music all that often. So how do they stay relevant to an ever-changing industry? It's not only a good question but a loaded one. Some artists have the fortune of a long and flourishing career. But why? It surely can't just be based on talent alone. If you really dig into it, sure there is talent involved (sometimes a lot of it), but there is also so much more. A musician is not only a person, but they're also a business—whether they like it or not. And more often than not that business didn't fund itself upon startup. So if there are enough people involved that depend on you and your "business" to succeed, then you can be damn sure that is exactly what will happen. Let's use Walmart as an example. They are constantly in the headlines for the treatment of their employees among other things, but it never really seems to make much of a difference in how they choose to operate. Why? Simply put, there is too much money involved for the powers that be to let the company fail. It would be financially devastating to millions of people, so it is in the best interest of everyone involved to keep the corporate giant marching on. The same type of scenario plays out in the music industry on a daily basis. So who gets to decide who is worthy of sustained career growth and industry longevity? We talk that and so much more on this almost 100th episode of your favorite school crossing guard's older brother's masseuse's favorite music podcast. It's season 4, episode 14. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
We're going to keep this short and sweet. If you've heard of (or should I say about) Jonny Craig, then simply forget what you've heard, read, or seen—you know like the Men In Black memory eraser thing, use that. If you have no idea who or what I am talking about, then perfect that is exactly what I want to hear. If you would also please refrain from using google and typing this gentleman's name into the search bar, that would also be greatly appreciated. Just simply hit up your favorite streaming service, type in the album's name (which is ungodly long), and start listening. Wow, you're done already? Awesome, now listen again. Man, twice in one hour? You're a champ, and third times a charm—just kidding, kind of. Really though, you can stop now. Now, feel free to google away. Most of what you're going to read is true (and unfortunate), I just didn't want it to take away from your listening experience. So what happens when you take a talented singer/songwriter from Canada, mix in a pretty severe drug habit, and an ego the size of Mt. Everest? Well, you get Jonny Craig. You might have also read that he has been kicked out of a handful of bands (some of which he was the founding member), this is also true. But in my honest opinion, his solo work far outweighs the stuff he did with those bands—but per usual, I am just the intern (unpaid) and I really have no clue what I am talking about. When all is said and done, we all have our own opinions of Jonny, especially those of us that have met him in person. But at the end of the day, there is a reason why so many of us keep coming back to this album. What's the reason you ask? Hey, how about you listen and find out. It's season 4, episode 13 of Jonny's future ex-bandmate's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
What is an album? In technical terms, it was ultimately a music industry workaround for not being able to use the term "LP"—thanks Columbia! But for many, the term album means different things. Ask five people, and you might even get five different answers as to what it means for something to be an "album". For many, an album is an album when a particular project is completed and turned over to the label for distribution to the masses. But with terms like "Single", "EP", and "LP" being thrown around, the term album can start to get a bit confusing. Back in the day, things like singles and EP's served a specific purpose, which more often than not is non-existent now. Some artists end up releasing half of their albums as singles before the album is ever released (sometimes years in advance). Other artists release more EPs than they do full polished albums when the EP was originally just meant to hold the music fan over until an artist would release a full album. Furthermore, there are even more artists that will release an EP and basically just call it an album, and that's all you get. This confusion leads directly back to how we consume music today as a whole. Digital consumption and streaming aren't entirely to blame though. A few years ago, you had to sign your life away to a record label to even have a small shot at making it big. But as time went on and technology improved, record labels became an afterthought for people trying to make it big in the music industry. Since then the music industry has been scrambling to try and figure out how to keep its head above water. Currently, that solution has been held together with the idea that quantity is more important than quality. If it seems like you're finding a new artist you've never heard of every time you scroll through Tik Tok, it's not just you—you literally are. There are more artists floating around in the digital music abyss than ever before. You might only ever hear a couple of singles from a particular artist. Even if they end up releasing an album eventually, it more than likely will just end up in the digital abyss of the internet. But a couple of disposable singles have the ability to keep the lights on as long as they keep inviting artists in, just to chur them out, chew them up, and continue the process. You know, the old rinse and repeat. That way the industry isn't putting all of its eggs in one musician's basket hoping that they deliver on time, and with something that is going to sell. Why not spread the egg wealth into an array of small baskets, because there is never a lack of those tiny little bastards is there? This not only oversaturates the market as a whole but creates much of the confusion that we're are talking about here. So I'll ask you again, what is an album? Yes, there are Singles, Extended Play, and Long Play (and yes you can help clarify the difference for Michelle), but where does this all fit in? We talk this and so much more on season 4, episode 12 of your favorite UPS delivery driver's little brother's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
As a musician, what do you do when the first project you're ready to present to the world doesn't get the reaction you were hoping for? For many, that would be enough to call it quits and pursue something else with their time. But for those that are destined to claw their way to the top of the industry, it means that you go back to the drawing board, and coming back with something that will forever change the landscape of the genre you've been working so hard to fit into—but fitting in is the last thing you're worried about. You decide that you're going to roll with your raw talent, the talent that was always there but thus far has fallen on deaf ears—only this time you're going to let it all go, and say anything and everything that is on your mind. The more offensive, the better, and nothing, I mean nothing is off the table. Your management thinks you're crazy, your label is wondering why they signed you, and you know deep down it's working—you're working. Couple this with a box of store-bought bleach, and the world is about to meet Slim Shady himself, and he doesn't give a f*ck. Now that the dust has settled, you know you've pissed off more than a few people and shook the industry to its core. But that raw edgy unforgiving talent is paying off, but also backfiring as just as quickly. You're this, you're that, you're being censored, and mainstream music is very divided by what you've brought to the table. So what do you do? You give them more of exactly what it is that has made them so quick to overreact in the first place—I mean after all, if you poke the bear enough times, it's eventually going to bite, and with that The Marshall Mathers LP is born. Often regarded as Eminem's best album to date, The Marshall Mathers LP set the music industry on fire when it was released in May of 2000. Just when you thought Eminem couldn't be any more offensive and vulgar, he proved everyone wrong. But when it comes down to it, press is press, whether it's good press or bad press. Although it seemed like he pissed off more people than he would have ever imagined. It worked. He worked, and the masses were eating it up like they were Kyle at a buffet. The Marshall Mathers LP would debut at number 1 on the Billboard 200, staying there for 8 consecutive weeks. The album sold 1.78 million copies in its first week, which made it among the fastest-selling studio albums in the United States at the time. Rolling Stone also named it the best album of 2000. The Marshall Mathers LP has been included in a variety of lists of the greatest albums of all time. It has sold 21 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling albums of all time, is certified Diamond by the RIAA, and was nominated for Album of the Year and won Best Rap Album at the 2001 Grammy Awards, while "The Real Slim Shady" won Best Rap Solo Performance. To say that this album took the industry by storm would be an understatement. Join us as we try and decipher exactly what makes Slim Shady so offensive yet so damn likeable all at the same time. It's season 4, episode 11 of Debbie's lawyer's second cousin's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
SPOILER ALERT: It is highly encouraged that you stop this episode, log on to your Netflix account, and watch the new documentary film they're featuring called "Count Me In". We talk about this film in-depth and discuss many things that would otherwise alter your experience if you plan on watching it at a later date. Every now and then Netflix hits the nail on the head with its content recommendations, and that is exactly what happened when "Count Me In" slid across our screen. This brand new documentary focuses on drummers and their love for the art of drumming. There is a vast difference between being 5 years old and telling everyone what you want to be when you grow up, to telling everyone that and actually growing up and being what you told everyone you wanted to be. This film is a coming-of-age love story of sorts, and you get to see firsthand how the love story plays out between a musician and their favorite instrument. A drum equates to much more than just an instrument that you bang on. Think of a pair of drum sticks like a pair of paintbrushes, and the drum kit, a palette of paint—with the canvas being your ears. With every single small movement, you create something new, and literally, every stroke is as important as the next. Drummers are more than just backing musicians, they're fully integrated members of the band, and truth be told, the band would be hard-pressed to carry on without them, and you'll see exactly why. While the film is presumably made for drummers, about drummers, and by drummers, you most certainly don't need to be one, to enjoy it. The film is orchestrated in a way that you cannot help but relate to, and enjoy the stories as they unfold. Join us as we take this rhythmic ride and discuss all things "Count Me In". It's season 4, episode 10, of your favorite drum tech's twin brother's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
As we keep trucking along through Season 4, most of you are probably familiar with our critically acclaimed album review series. This season we've decided to switch it up a bit and allow you the listener to pick an album for us to chat about every so often—this being the first go at that, we've decided to go with Mr. Porter's pick of "Who's Next" by none other than The Who. The Who were nothing new, and by the time 1970 rolled around the band themselves were no stranger to critical acclaim and commercial success. They kept that ball rolling into 1971 when they released "Who's Next". The band's 5th studio album, which was an immediate hit, and has gone on to be considered by many to be the best album that The Who has ever released. Some even consider it to be one of the greatest albums of all time. Who's Next was born from the abandoned "Lifehouse" project, which was a multi-media rock opera written by Pete Townshend as a follow-up to the band's 1969 album "Tommy". The project was canceled for various reasons, but some of the material was salvaged (without the connecting story elements) and later was used for a majority of what we've come to know as "Who's Next". Whether you consider yourself to be a fan of The Who, or maybe you're just The Who adjacent, and don't really care one way or the other, this is definitely an album worth checking out. Plus you'll get rad flashbacks from watching CSI on all those late-night when you couldn't sleep. Is it bad or beneficial that The Who has licensed a ton of their music to movies and TV shows? Join us as we take a deep dive yet again and talk about the good, the bad, the obvious, Limp Bizkit, and whether or not my wife is a stinker. Is your wife a stinker? Let's talk about it! It's season 4, episode 9 of your favorite bartender's little cousin's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Just tuning in? It is highly recommended that you listen to part 1 of this 2 part episode first. Don't want to? That's cool too, you can join in right here and be just as confused as Michelle was while we recorded it. Cheers! 1991 was an incredible year in music, but it often gets sold short in the music press. When people reflect on the year in music, it's usually reduced to something like "Nirvana released Nevermind and all other music died". That couldn't be further from the truth and the IGP Crew is here to discuss it. This is the second of a two-part episode where we break down many other huge releases from 1991 across all genres. In this second and final half, we take a stroll from July through December stopping along the way to give credit to the heavy-hitting albums that dropped. Brooks & Dunn, Spin Doctors, Ozzy, Mariah Carey, Garth Brooks, Geto Boys, Ice Cube, Tesla, and many more are all along for the ride. Debut albums? Check. Now legendary albums? Check. Final albums? Check. Game-changing albums? Check. It's all here and that's just for starters. While Nirvana's Nevermind LP did in fact go on to change the landscape of the music scene, the fact is that there's just a lot more to 1991 than that. Come with us as Russ, Michelle & Kyle walk you through the second and final half of one of the biggest years in the history of music. It's Season 4 (yes Michelle, we're still in Season 4) Episode 8 of your favorite music historian's little sister's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
1991 was an incredible year in music, but it often gets sold short in the music press. When people relfect on the year in music, it's usuallly reduced to something like "Nirvana released Nevermind and all other music died". That couldn't be further from the truth and the IGP Crew is here to discuss it. This is the first of two episodes where we break down many other huge releases from 1991 across all genres. In this first half, we take a stroll from January through June stopping along the way to give credit to the heavy hitting albums that dropped. Queen, R.E.M., Mr. Big, Skid Row, Anthrax, Boyz II Men, Van Halen, NWA and many more are all along for the ride. Debut albums? Check. Now legendary albums? Check. Final albums? Check. Game changing albums? Check. It's all here and that's just for starters. While Nirvana's Nevermind LP did in fact go on to change the landscape of the music scene, the fact is that there's just a lot more to 1991 then that. Come with us as Russ, Michelle & Kyle walk you through the first half of one of the biggest years in the history of music. It's Season 4 (yes Michelle, we're still in Season 4) Episode 7 of the guy who usually writes our descriptions but is dealing with a ridiculous power outage, also known as The Bumper's favorite music podcast and as he would say: LET'S GO!!Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify.
Much to the surprise of Michelle, we've somehow made it to season four (even though this is the sixth episode in season four). We think she just got here, but cannot be certain—so why don't you all give Michelle a warm welcome as she has finally decided to join the show. As promised, this week we've continued our critically acclaimed album review series. If you're new here (like Michelle), basically every couple of episodes we choose an album, and then take a deep dive into said album and discuss it with all of you. For many (especially the hardcore dedicated fans) Pink Floyd ended when Roger Waters did a cartwheel out of the door and into a solo career of his own. Even Roger himself would say that HE is what made Pink Floyd, well Pink Floyd—and it certainly seems that many others also agree. Fast forward to 1994, and Pink Floyd finally reached the apex of what they would become without having Roger by their side. The Division Bell, which happens to be the band's fourteenth album might be the closest thing a Pink Floyd fan has gotten to a Pink Floyd album without having Roger Waters involved. The Divison Bell was also Russ' last-ditch effort on trying to get Michelle to enjoy a Pink Floyd album, and it might have finally worked. The Divison Bell, with David Gilmour at the helm, is a more atmospheric, contemplative, and quiet Pink Floyd which might have surprised quite a few people that were expecting them to live up to what they once were with Roger Waters in tow. With lyrics that can be interpreted as being very inert, or lackluster (mostly because they were written by someone who knew nothing about writing songs) this album might have left people yearning for more. With a title like The Divison Bell, the album can be looked at as a roundabout way of understanding, realizing, and coming to terms with an ultimate failure in communication. We get it guys, you don't like Roger, but at some point, you're going to have to meet in the middle because he isn't shy about not liking you either—it is what it is. Also, if you guys are by chance taking requests, Kyle would like you to shorten each song, by about five minutes. How does The Division Bell hold up to the internet's most musically diverse tripod? Wouldn't you like to know? Hit play goddammit and find out! It's season 4, episode 6 of Roger Water's personal assistant's dog trainer's pool boy's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! HEY! OUR FRIENDS NEED YOUR HELP!!! SOME ASSHAT LET THEIR CAMPFIRE RUN RAMPANT AND IT BURNT UP A WHOLE LOT OF SHIT! ANYTHING WILL HELP, LINK BELOW!!!https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-the-porters-rebuild-their-home?utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&utm_medium=copy_link_all&utm_source=customer Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
A lot of things happened in 1969, some you may recall, and others not so much. If you're saying to yourself "hey isn't that when Woodstock happened?" then you most certainly are on the right train of thought, you know seeing as this is a music podcast and all. But there was more to 1969 than met the eye, and it had nothing to do with Whitey being on the moon. During the same time, that year when Woodstock was making history and setting the precedence of what we would come to know as the modern-day American-style music festival, something else was unfolding just 100 miles away. A man named Tony Lawrence had a plan in 1967 and after successfully convincing the New York City Parks Department, in 1969 the Harlem Cultural Festival was born. Let me guess, you've never heard of such a thing, and if you have someone probably told you that it likely never happened and was something of an urban legend. Thanks to Questlove, we all now know that this festival that packed nearly 300,000 people into Mount Morris Park (now known as Marcus Garvey Park) in Harlem over a period of six weeks in the summer of 1969 did in fact happen, and man was it a sight to see. This week we're covering "Summer Of Soul" which is Questlove's newest film venture and his directorial debut available exclusively at home on Hulu and in theaters near you. The film focuses on six weeks in the summer of 1969 when people flocked to Mount Morris Park in Harlem to see a myriad of up-and-coming and already famous performers do what they do best—absolutely blow everyone watching, away. This was known as The Harlem Cultural Festival and it was more than just a music festival. It was a celebration of Black history, music, culture, and fashion. It was also used as a vehicle to promote the continued politics of Black Pride. With the blessings of the Mayor, Maxwell House Coffee to sponsor the event, and the Black Panthers to provide security when the NYPD wouldn't—history was made, and now it's available for all to witness. We sat down and watched this film, and so should you. Find out what we thought and so much more on season 4, episode 5 of your favorite documentary filmmaker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Fresh from their hiatus/babycation to Isle Drool, Michelle and Kyle are back in the studio to continue our critically acclaimed music review series. That's right you heard that correctly, the OG tripod is back in action for the first time in what seems like forever—enjoy!John Mayer is a lot of things to a lot of people. To most, he's that one guy that's kind of douchey that sang "Your Body Is A Wonderland", was on Chapelle Show a time or two, and dated a bunch of well-known celebrities—which to be fair (you know you just repeated that to yourself) are all true, but damn is John Mayer so much more. Having countless hits over the years John Mayer seems to know what he's doing when it comes to writing music we can all relate to. Not only does he know his way around a guitar, but he also knows his way around writing a hit song. Winning seven Grammys, and countless other music-related accolades over the years he was able to prove almost immediately that he wasn't going anywhere, any time soon. Eight albums later, and he is still a relevant talented musical force to be reckoned with. Battle Studies, which is his fourth offering in album form is just that, a series of studies on how things went awry in one's personal realtionships. Carefully crafted, this album lets the listener in on the battles we will all face at one time or another when an important relationship comes to an end, and a new one begins. With his relentless authenticity, John Mayer is able to take us on the ride of a lifetime, and it feels like we're sitting there watching everything unfold firsthand. Battle Studies is John Mayer at one of his most refined and focused moments, and boy does it show. Join us this week as we delve into one hell of a John Mayer album. It's season four, episode four of your favorite strip club bartender's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Record Store Day draws thousands of line ladened music fanatics from all over the world, and with good reason and intention, but why? Who wants to stand in line (surely not Michelle) to try and get their hands on a record that— wait better yet, who even listens to records anyhow? The answer, a hell of a lot of people, that's who and the number is growing. Started in 2007 as a way to celebrate and spread the word about the unique culture that exists around and within independently owned record shops. The very first Record Store Day was held on April 19th, 2008 and now Record Store Day has now spread across the globe, to literally everywhere except Antarctica. What used to be a rather small community of supposed "music snobs", the vinyl collecting community has exploded in recent years, with no intention of slowing down. But with this explosion, comes money, and with money comes corporate America wanting their piece of the vinyl pie. More people buying more records is a wonderful thing until it isn't. Thus far Record Store Day has been reserved for smaller independent establishments, but it's only a matter of time until corporate America comes looking for a way to cash in. Big retail giants like Wal-Mart and Target are already getting a taste of just how lucrative the vinyl market can be with all of their special releases and exclusive colors that they have been releasing. Where does this lead? Only time will tell. Over the years, Record Store Day has become not only the time of year that we all line up for exclusive records that have never been pressed or released but it's also become that one time every year where we get to meet new people and see old friends that we otherwise wouldn't have gotten to know if it weren't for that pesky old wait in line at the local record shop. If corporate America does force its way in, things will surely change and the Record Store Day we know today will most likely be a thing of the past. This week we're talking RSD, the past, present, and what the future might hold. It's season four, episode three of your favorite vape shop salesman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Yes, Kings Of Leon recently released an album, and no you should absolutely not start there if you want to dig into their catalog more. Do us, and yourself a favor and leave that album sitting by itself on the shelf at Wal-Mart.It's SEASON FOUR! I know right, HOLY $H!T IT'S SEASON FOUR!!! We hope you enjoyed the premiere episode last week—we know Seth did. With Season Four, comes the continuation of our album review series where we pick an album, listen to it tirelessly, and then pick it apart. Fun right? When you read the title you were probably like, "Kings Of Leon? You mean the Sex On Fire guys? Wtf is Mechanical Bull?". It's okay, we understand. For most of you, Kings Of Leon probably started with "Sex On Fire", and ended with "Use Somebody". You're certainly not alone but the crazy thing is, is that those songs were on their FOURTH ALBUM! Yes, you read that right, their fourth album is what everyone knows them for, which to us is just insane. They not only had three FULL albums before they found commercial success, but they also snuck two EP's in there as well. If KOL lack anything, it sure isn't work ethic. The funny thing is, the band continued to work just as hard sticking to what they were good at even after they found success. You might be saying "yeah but all of their songs sound the same, that's why they fell off", and you're not wrong. Yes, their songs all do sound very similar, and there is definitely that KOL sound that they have mastered over the years. Where you're wrong is, that's the beauty of the band. A consistent, reliable sound, wrapped around often times great and thoughtful lyrics (that would be easier to understand if the lead singer wasn't eating PB&J sandwiches while recording, but that's neither here nor there). What more could one ask for from a band they enjoy listening to? So where does this lead us? Well in this particular situation leads us to their sixth studio album, Mechanical Bull—which as Russ and Kyle were recently reminded, is a damn fantastic one at that. Even after all of their commercial success with their fourth album, and after all of their fire sex fizzled out they still put forth all of the efforts as if they were still trying to make it big. Why? Well, our guess is, not only are they talented as hell—but Kings of Leon have mastered sounding like and being Kings Of Leon and they do it in such a masterful and consistent way that you just simply cannot turn away once you start listening. This week we take a deep dive into Mechanical Bull, and try and figure out what it is about this band and this album that makes it so we just can't get enough. The good, the bad, and the stinky—it's season 4, episode two of your favorite honky-tonk bucking machine operator's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It Was All A Dream

It Was All A Dream

2021-07-0558:16

It's Season 4, and we're BACK—but don't call it a comeback, because you know damn well we never really left! In the Season 4 premiere, we've got Russ in-studio with Michelle and Kyle joining remotely from Babyland—the land of milk, sharts, and tired cries. So bear with us as it might sound like they're on the phone (because they are), and the sound quality you're used to might sound a bit different this go around. Have you ever wished you had the chance to attend a particular concert, or see a particular artist perform and you've just never gotten around to it? Maybe the artist passed away before you had the chance to see them live, or maybe you're like Michelle, and concert ticket prices are just too damn high. This week Russ presented the crew with an excellent question: If you could attend any artist's show (living, dead, almost dead, etc.) who would it be? Think of it as a dream show, with a dream line-up. An Opening Act of our choice, followed by a Headliner—don't mind if we do. You're probably thinking about how easy it would be to try and come up with a good answer, and for someone like Russ (who's seen more live music than some working musicians) it may be, but just sit and think for a second and we bet you'll change your mind at least 5 times, maybe even 10 times. So join us (while you're still changing your mind) as we create our own fantasy live music line-up, and explain why we chose who we did. Kyle even creates his very own music festival. It's the Season 4 premiere of your favorite Youtube vinyl collector's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If you asked any of the three of us just a short time ago if we would be wrapping up the third season of our podcast, and working our way into a fourth—we most likely would have just laughed and changed the subject. It's all still a bit surreal that we are able to sit here and do this, and you all want to continue to listen. Without all of you, we wouldn't be where we are today—so thank you, really. We've decided to wrap up season 3 by continuing our album review series. For many of us, when Iceland is mentioned, one of the first things that come to mind is The Mighty Ducks—or maybe that's just me. Either way, in the sequel the team's arch-nemesis is a hockey team from Iceland. We also learned (from the movie) that Greenland is covered with ice, and Iceland is very nice! Known widely as "the Land of Fire and Ice", Iceland is known for many things but here in America, we don't usually hear a lot from them within the mainstream music channels. It turns out that they may have as much to offer musically as they do visually and culturally. Fresh out of Mosfellsbær, Iceland, KALEO (pronounced KAL-EO, or KA-LE-O, or even KUH-LEE-OW), we still have not one damn clue how to officially pronounce their name—we've been struggling with this for some time now, and there doesn't seem to be an end in sight. KALEO (however you'd like to pronounce it in your head while reading this) exploded onto the Icelandic music scene in 2012 and quickly worked its way into the ears of fans all over the world. Over the years they have continued to progress with their music, and Surface Sounds is a perfect example of that. Surface Sounds is the band's third official album and their latest offering. Initially slated for release in early 2020, Surface Sounds was postponed for a year due to the worldwide pandemic. If you're familiar with KALEO and their earlier works then you are well on your way to enjoying this one as well. If you heard us try and pronounce their name on air yet again, and wondered to yourself "who in the hell is that?", then this is where you start. Start here, and work your way backward into their catalog—then thank us later. Or just thank us now, however you'd prefer—we're not picky. The good, the bad, the ugly, us continuously trying to say their name correctly and failing miserably. This episode has it all. Plus it's the season 3 finale so just listen to it already will ya? It's season 3 episode 21 of your favorite labor and delivery Nurse's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's not every day that someone mentions something positive and Ohio in the same sentence—but there are a few exceptions now and again. When you think of Ohio you might think of Cedar Point, Lebron James, The O'Jays, Tracy Chapman, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, The Ohio Players, The Black Keys, or Screamin' Jay Hawkins just to name a few. You typically don't think of something that Ohio has that you really cannot find anywhere else but nestled neatly within Cleveland's city limits lives The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame—you may or may not have heard of such a place. Famous for their museum of musical artifacts, their spaghetti dinners, and inductees that oftentimes make no sense. The Rock Hall as many call it has become a go-to tourist attraction for music lovers all over the world. Started by Ahmet Ertegun in 1983 as a way to showcase and honor musical acts and history within the music industry, Cleveland became the Rock Hall's permanent home in 1986 with the museum itself being dedicated in 1995. Over the years the Rock Hall has found itself in the midst of controversy, whether it be about how "the board" makes its inductee selections, the inductees themselves, racism, sexism, the way they conduct business in general, or their weird "spaghetti" dinners they host to raise money. They've even been accused of displaying replica artifacts while trying to pass them off as the real thing. This week we're back talking about this year's inductees, award winners, and whether or not anyone seems to care about the Rock Hall in general anymore. If you haven't listened to our other episode which is about the Rock Hall in general, we encourage you to do so as well. Also, if you haven't heard, Kyle couldn't care less about anyone or anything trying to tell him what is cool or what music he should appreciate. Come hang with us as we tackle The Rock Hall once again! It's season 3, episode 20 of your favorite ticket scalper's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's 2001 but don't call it a comeback, even though so many did at the time. It had been six years since Michael Jackson had released an album and the anticipation was eating his fans alive. Having endured years of media scrutiny people wondered if he still had it, or if he was going to stay out of the limelight for good. Not only did Michael still have it, but he also had some things he still needed to get off his chest, and that is exactly what he did. Recorded over a period of four years, while spending a reported $30 million dollars to perfect what would be his last studio album. Invincible set out to prove that Michael was just that, and he was going to let everyone (whether they wanted to hear it or not) know about it. Having been continuously harassed and terrorized by the media and various extortionists, Michael showed everyone that he was once again an unstoppable force to be reckoned with. Many would say that musically, Michael could do no wrong, and pretty much everything he involves himself with turns to gold—but this wasn't necessarily the case when Invincible was released. Met with a wide variety of criticism initially it seemed as though Michael's last offering, was surely not his best. Many blame the ongoing conflicts between him and his record label at the time for causing the issues that lead to little to no promotion of the album, and no worldwide tour to support its release. While those things absolutely impacted the initial success and acceptance of the album as a whole, others were left thinking to themselves "what about the song sequencing though?"—and with that very valid point, we at IGP are with you on that one. As a continuation of our ongoing album review series, join us as we take a dive into exactly what made MJ so invincible after all. The haves, the have-nots, the stinky pinkys, the wonky stonks, and the absolute F@!%ING JAMS (because there are more than a few). It's season 3, episode 19 of Chris Tucker's first wife's second cousin's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Road To Nowhere

Road To Nowhere

2021-05-2401:02:09

WARNING: This episode contains sensitive subject matter about mental health and suicide. This may be a trigger for some listeners of the show. If you or someone you know is struggling with or having thoughts of suicide, there is help available 24/7 at the number listed below.National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 800-273-8255 You're 18 years old, and you've just gotten the call. Your band has been invited to go on the road and open for one of the biggest rock bands on the planet. This is the moment you've been waiting for. You gather the band, figure out some logistical stuff, pack your van to the gills with equipment and head out. The first show is only about an eight-hour drive, so you leave early allowing yourself more than enough time to get there and get set up. You're nervous, excited, unsure of the future, you've never played a show that wasn't a local bar or club—this is a whole new animal that you're more than willing to try and tame. First tour show #5 - You're already starting to lose track of where you are and where you're headed next. Sleeping in the van is getting old, but the hotel after-parties, girls, unlimited amounts of booze, and drugs are exactly what you had been dreaming of. First tour show #15 - You're now in a bit of a rhythm (if you can even call it that), you and the guys pooled enough money together to start staying in cheap motels instead of being in that cramped disgusting van. Things are looking up even though you're already exhausted. Parties, girls, drinks, drugs, let's go! First tour show #31 - What day is this? What city are you in? Who even knows anymore? Part of the band has been sleeping in motels, part in the van. Who knew this much time together would put your relationships to the test? The parties, the girls, the booze, and the drugs—they're all still there, but mentally you're not. You've been calling early nights lately, and locking your door when you do so. You never thought this whole new animal would be so difficult to tame. Fast forward 30 years... Your band lineup has changed multiple times over the years, you've lost countless friends to drugs, alcohol, and suicide but you're still at it, still grinding, still playing, still creating, and still making it happen. Music money is structured differently these days, which means more time on the road, and less time with the wife and kids. The parties, girls, booze, and drugs are all still there but you've been sober for longer than you can remember, so that's neither here nor there. You also make sure you get a good room in a good hotel, or atleast a comfy spot on the bus, because let's face it you're too old to not know where you're going to be laying your head at night. You and the guys are gearing up for another stint on the road to support your latest effort. The fans are eager, and the bills won't pay themselves.You're almost 50 years old now, and you've just taken a call that you never imagined you'd be taking. All shows. All Tours. All everything. Cancelled. There is a virus, it's spreading fast, and you cannot risk your safety or the safety of the general public. For the first time in 30 years, you're left wondering, what's next? No schedule, no grind, no jet lag, no tour bus, no playing for thousands of adoring fans, no meet and greets, no shows. One week turns into two, two turns into twelve, and before you know it, it's been a year. You've had an entire year to find yourself, to just sit, to eat breafast with your wife, watch your kids graduate from colllege, to start a workout regimen, find a show on Netflix you truly like. But you're not truly out of the game, you find a way to keep the music going—the internet. You and the guys, much like everyone else have started performing virtually for fans from all across the globe. You've also started teaching master classes for paying fans that hope to gain the knowledge of someone whos been in "the biz" since he can remember. These are all ways of paying those bills that refuse to pay themselves but without having to grind yourself into mental pulp while doing it. For the first time in 30 years, you can take a deep breath, and relax.Fast forward 1 year...Vaccines are happening. People are feeling safe again, and the fans are eager for a live show. Venues (or what's left of them) are slowly opeing back up. The label is eager to get you and the guys back together, and back on the road. One by one, artist after artist, friend after friend, start to annouce tour after tour. But is it safe? They say it's safe enough. "But what if I'm not ready?" you ask yourself. You're nervous, excited, and unsure of the future. You remeber this feeling. Your mind begins to race... Tour, van, bus, hotel, motel, parties, girls, booze (you've been sober for years), drugs (look you're sober, relax!), studio, album, tour, van, bus, hotel, parties. Your mind is racing as fast as your heart. "Am I having a heart attack?" you ask yourself. "Is this an axiety attack? Am I f!@#ing dying here? After all this?" you say under your breath. Nope you're not dying, but it is an axiety attack. You've spent the last year, unpacking 30 years worth of music industry baggage and damn did it feel good. You've made money (lots of money) using the tools you've learned over the lockdown and you haven't had grind yourself into nothing while doing it. You know what you need to do. You know you're feeling better than ever, and you know you're done with the long haul. Now it's time to tell the rest of the world... It's season 3, epsiode 18 of your favorite retired touring musician's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
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Comments (4)

Christmas Fantasy

I have nothing to avoid https://9apps.ooo/download/. I moved to a new city last August. I literally have nothing and no one. I've been extremely lonely for the past 3 years.

Jun 21st
Reply

Castbox

Love what y'all are doing with this podcast. It's a grab bag of fun and your inter-host banter is top notch!

Mar 19th
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Arielle Nissenblatt

“gangsta rap” hahaha

Mar 16th
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