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We've come around once again to one of our favorite segments of the podcast, where we let you the listener choose an album, any album, and then we take a crack at listening, reviewing, and then telling you all what we think of it as a whole. This week we were tasked with taking on not only an album that we had never heard before but also an artist that we had never heard of. A master of "Murderfolk" (which we had also not heard of until taking a stab at this album), a crooner from the dark side, straight from the mind of Danny Kiranos. If you haven't figured out who I'm talking about yet, it sounds like you might need to brush up on a little bit of Amigo The Devil. Amigo The Devil is no stranger to darkness, serial killers, or country music. In October 2018 Danny Kiranos, better known by his stage name Amigo The Devil released his first full-length album titled "Everything Is Fine". Recruiting Ross Robinson for production and Brad Wilk of Rage Against The Machine for drums. A pretty big deal for an outlaw country guy putting together his first full-length project. "Everything Is Fine" and Amigo The Devil are both unique listening experiences in the least and if you had to liken them to something you're more familiar with, think along the lines of if Johnny Cash and Orville Peck had a little music baby and sang about even deeper and darker stuff than they already do. Sound strange? Sound appealing? It certainly does and that is because it is. I would love to keep writing about this Amigo, but unfortunately, there isn't a whole lot of info floating around out there about him, so perhaps the easiest way to get to know him is to listen to this album. It's season 6, episode 8 of your favorite local exterminator's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's not often that you come across a song that seemingly transcends time and space when performed by two different artists. It's even more interesting when those two artists are on the complete opposite ends of the musical spectrum. You might be wondering what the hell I am even talking about, and before you swerve off the road in a podcast rage, let me explain. In 1994 Trent Reznor and his band Nine Inch Nails would release The Downward Spiral (also known to NIN fans as Halo 8). The final track on the album would tell a dark weathered story about drug addiction and self-harm. Trent doesn't divulge much information about the reasoning behind the writing of his songs, as he wants to leave it up to the interpretation of the listener, but it's rumored that this song was written in retrospect. But when listening it certainly seems that Trent was writing about something he knew a little something about from being thrust into superstardom and getting buried within the darkness that is the music industry. Whether it's an autobiographical tale or just a story about a friend of a friend, it certainly hits home for those that can relate to it. Fast forward to 2002, and the last person you'd ever expect to find himself near a Nine Inch Nails track would lend his iconic vocals to his own version of the song, helped along (or hindered) by Rick Rubin lending his production skills to the reworked track. People at first were quite skeptical because your average Johnny Cash fan has not a clue who Trent Reznor or the Nine Inch Nails are. Hell, Trent Reznor was even skeptical about Johnny Cash covering his work because of the potential for it to add a gimmicky value. It turns out that Rick Rubin might have figured out something that no one else had at the time. This version of the song felt like a window into Johnny Cash's past where he also struggled with many of the same things that Trent had throughout the years, just for much, much longer. A true retrospective view on a tattered and torn life in the music industry. Johnny Cash's version of this already iconic song would eventually be considered one of his greatest works. Its accompanying video, featuring images from Cash's life and directed by Mark Romanek, was named the best video of the year by the Grammy Awards and CMA Awards, and the best video of all time by NME in July 2011. Hurt (Cash's Version) would go on to sell 2,148,000 downloads in the United States as of March 2017. To say that it made a huge impact, would I think be putting it quite lightly. When all is said and done there are just some covers that hit the nail on the head, and this happens to be one of them. It's season 6, episode 7 of your (yes, you the listeners) favorite music podcast. Hell, maybe it's even your favorite weekly podcast to listen to overall. If that's the case, we're not sure what else to say besides THANK YOU. Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Suns Out Buns Out

Suns Out Buns Out

2022-06-0652:01

Well now that spring has sprung and we've moved on to 85-degree temps with 70% humidity, things are starting to stick to one another, so we thought it would be fitting to talk about our favorite summer songs that go along with our favorite summer activities. Summer is not only a season but also a mental state. It could be 40 degrees and rainy but when you throw on that specific song, you're immediately transported to a sunny beach or maybe a backyard barbecue. I know for me, sometimes (depending on the song) it only takes a second to put me right back in the backyard, grill going HAM, cold beer in hand, with my buns out. Hey, not those kinds of buns pervert, don't you grill your buns before you slap your favorite kind of meat in them? Sheesh! This week we're talking about the top songs that we either hear the most during summer or make us think of that savory summer sun. If you're still thinking of my buns, for one, stop. For two, get your own! There is even a bit of story time this week, which is always something we know you guys look forward to. Whether you're at the local neighborhood cookout or down at the beach catching a wave, or maybe you've even had the unfortunate experience of coming home to find Grandma in the backyard by the pool tanning her hide. Regardless of any of that, there are songs that represent our summertime experiences, and we're here to talk about them. Join us as we sip these margaritas and slip into something more swimmable. In the meantime, we'll leave you to get that vision of Grandma out of your head. It's season 6, episode 5 of your favorite drunken uncle's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Season 6 is rolling and we're back with another one of our famous or well if you're Michelle, "infamous" album reviews. This week Russ decided to throw a hail mary and pick something he thought for sure everyone would love. Hailing from Australia is a little band that you might have heard about at some point in your music listening career. Shoving their way into the music industry all the way back in 1977. Initially known for their new wave/pop style, the band later developed a harder pub rock style that included funk and dance elements. It wasn't until 1984 that INXS would finally snag a number-one hit in Australia with "Original Sin", and the band would later achieve substantial international success in the mid-to-late 1980s and early 1990s with the hit albums like "Kick". The band's sixth studio album would kick the music industry's door in (no pun intended) and is still the band's most successful studio album to date. Exploding onto the music scene in October of 1987, and initially rejected by Atlantic Records for being too far off from their traditional rock base, but "Kick" lauched the band into worldwide popularity and put them on a brand new level within the industry. The album peaked at No. 1 in Australia, No. 3 on the US Billboard 200, No. 9 in the UK and No. 15 in Austria. In the US, the album spent a total of 79 weeks on the Billboard 200, staying 22 consecutive weeks in the top 10. Just two months after it's initial release the album would reach platinum status with the RIAA in the US. By the end of 1989, it was certified quadruple platinum, having sold in excess of four million units in the United States alone. "Kick" remains the band's best-selling album in Canada, earning a diamond certification from the CRIA, for shipments of one million copies. "Kick" would go on to be certified six times platinum by the RIAA and peaked at number three on the Billboard 200. Having your sixth studio album perform as well as "Kick" has, is somewhat of a modern day miracle. It's almost like these guys knew exactly what they were doing at the time, even if the record label didn't understand (thanks Grandpa). To say that "Kick" was a smash it, would be a severe understatement. This timeless album was on fire, and still is when you drop (gently set) the needle on it today. Join us as we jump on the Michael Hutchence bandwagon, and take one hell of a ride. It's season 6, episode 4 of your favorite Aussie's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
As we continue to Humpty Dance our way into season 6, your favorite musical tripod has decided to do something a little different and add a new themed episode into the rotation of episodes you've grown to know and love. Covers, covers, covers, and we're not talking karaoke. You love em', you hate em', and so do we. It seems like covers go back as far as your favorite songs do. Artists have been covering one another's work since the very beginning, and like most things in life, some do it way better than others. So every time one of these episodes rolls around we're going to be taking a particular song done by an artist and then talking about one of the more famous covers that another band has done of that particular song. We're anticipating that the highlight of each of these episodes will be Michelle realizing that a particular song that she knows and loves was in fact a cover of another band's work.This week we're taking a listen to a band that has been around since your grandparents were in diapers. Okay, maybe not that long, but they've been around for a really long god damn time, and that may or may not be a good thing. Did you guess The Rolling Stones? If not, shame on you. Once upon a time, they recorded this little god damn jam that you may or may not know called "Sympathy For The Devil", and some years later Axl Rose had a giant raging music boner, and decided that he and whatever rotating lineup of band members he had in Guns N' Roses at the time would grab that song by the balls and give it the Axl twist and that's exactly what they did. But did they do a good job? That's what we're here to talk about. But this is where the talking stops, go listen for yourself, and then come back and listen to our banter. I bet you won't regret any of those decisions. It's season 6, episode 3 of your favorite son's, vice principal's sister's, favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Before diving headfirst into this episode, it is recommended that you go back and listen to the episodes that we dedicated solely to 1984 and 1991. But hey, if you want to be confused, and listen to this episode first, by all means, you do you. After reading the title of this episode, you might be thinking "hey I thought this was a music podcast", and you are correct, it most certainly is. Truth be told music in the mid-80s/early 90s was on fire, and there is no denying that. You could even go as far as to say that music was BULGING with talent and hits. See what I did there? Yes, that's right, Slash's favorite skinny jeans weren't the only thing with a big ol' bulge back in the day. With so much talent packed into just a few short years in the music industry, it was suggested by our listeners that we do a little comparison between the two, to see who we thought should come out on top. The lists of albums that came out during these two time periods is something truly to be wreckoned with, and the fact that we had to choose one over the other made us (Russ and Kyle) quite sad. Michelle didn't seem to care all that much, and as you'll come to find out, she has her a tribe of her own out there somewhere, so it is what it is. So what do you guys think? Which bulge was better? You might just come to realize that bigger isn't necesarily what you should be concerend with, and that longevity could very well be the key to it all. Come take another ride down the greatest musical rabbit hole out there, and see if you can come away with a clear cut winner. it's season 6, episode 2 of your favorite record store employee's, tattoo artist's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
AND WE'RE BACK! Man, that seemed like the longest between-season break ever, but lucky for you, we're back and better than ever. This season (season 6 a.k.a season 3 or 4 if you ask Michelle) is going to be another killer ride. We're starting this one off strong with our critically acclaimed album review series that you've all mostly grown to love.This time it's Kyle who went the extra mile and plugged us in with something that many of you might not have tuned into before hearing this. We all know of The Weeknd, I mean how could you not? He's been in the musical air supply for quite some time now, but what you hear now and where it all began are wildly different. The Weeknd was releasing music long before he had a major label record deal, and many of those projects are what put him on the map to begin with. Considered to be his first major-label release, Kiss Land turned it up a notch when it came to production, writing, art direction, and the overall concept of a project. Working with new producers and refusing to allow himself to be boxed into a specific sound and style. He even chose an album title that he thought would initially throw his fans off when they learned about its upcoming release. The Weeknd is no stranger when it comes to putting together a good concept album, and Kiss Land is no different. Meant to represent the trials and tribulations of life on the road, Kiss Land is full of sexual obsession, betrayal, addiction, and big-ticket trust issues and it's a weirdly exhilarating experience, that isn't for the faint of heart. Initially met with generally positive reviews, Kiss Land would debut at number two on the US Billboard 200 with 95,000 copies sold in its first week, and would go on to be certified gold by 2019. That may seem underwhelming compared to the numbers that he currently does, but you have to remember that this is considered to be his "debut album", and reaching number 2 on the Billboard 200 with your first major-label offering is nothing short of impressive.Okay enough of the small talk, Kyle is telling me to tell you all that I should just let the album speak for itself, so that's what I am going to do. It's season 6, episode 1 of Amber Heard's legal team's, personal assistant's dog walker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Dumpster Fyre

Dumpster Fyre

2022-04-1801:03:24

DISCLAIMER: This episode contains potential spoilers that involve two separate documentaries about the events that unfolded at a particular music festival (that never actually happened). It is advised that you go and check out "Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened" on Netflix and "Fyre Fraud" on Hulu. By doing so, it will loop you into this entire episode so you're not sitting there confused like Michelle is half of the time.Somehow, someway, and still unbeknownst to Michelle, we've made it through 5 whole seasons of this podcast. We say thank you A LOT, but we really truly mean it. Without you guys, this podcast would just be three music nerds arguing about random music shit while drinking in a dimly but colorfully lit basement with one of the most extensive record collections you've ever seen. You guys are the reason we've been able to take this show to the next level, and for that, we will be forever grateful.While we're on the subject of being grateful, we imagine that those who attended the biggest music festival farce in history are also probably forever grateful that they made it out of that whole ordeal alive. Calling it a perpetual dumpster fire would be putting it lightly, and would never really do the events that actually unfolded before everyone's eyes, any real justice. A story that when told, seems like that of a mockumentary of sorts. Perhaps the best mockumentary you could ever imagine watching, but unfortunately for literally everyone involved "The Fyre Festival" wasn't part of any fake documentary for everyone to mock. It was a very real idea, that had very real consequences.What do you get when you mix a fraudster with the right connections, a lot of money that belongs to other people, and an idea that would (in reality) take years to actually come to fruition?The brainchild of master swindler and self-proclaimed "entrepreneur" Billy McFarland, The Fyre Festival was supposed to be the world's most elite and luxurious music festival that anyone had ever seen. Set to take place in the Bahamas, The Fyre Festival was supposed to have it all and then some, but the events that would unfold would tell a very, very different story.This week we're talking about the biggest music festival dumpster fyre of all time, and it's a doozie if we've ever heard of one. A music festival with no actual music? Check. FEMA tents sold as private luxury villas? Check. No electricity or running water? Check. Cheese sandwiches instead of the gourmet food you were promised? Check. Continuing to defraud the same people who put their money and trust into you? Check. We watched all hell break loose, and if you're listening to this, chances are you also watched all hell break loose at the greatest but also the worst music festival that never was.This leaves us with one lingering question. Just how far would you go to make sure that everyone had clean drinking water? It's the season 5 finale of Billy McFarland's cell mate's ex-wife's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
From time to time here at Infectious Groove, we run across a particular artist or group that puts so much time and effort into a project that you can't help but fall in love with it. When time and effort are a top priority it becomes obvious just how far a carefully crafted album can take you. Couple that with mastering the art of live performance, and you have an undeniable package that most artists only dream of. These guys might have cut their teeth in NYC, but what you're hearing here doesn't sound like anything else coming out of the empire state. The Lone Bellow put the pedal to the metal when it came to putting together their sophomore effort "Then Came The Morning". A carefully crafted, and well thought out project that represents not only who The Lone Bellow are, but also the direction in which they're headed. A continuation perhaps, of the sound we've come to know from their first record, but with subtle differences in production due to their working with Aaron Dessner. Even with the changes in production, make no mistake as this is still very much an album that is owned entirely by The Lone Bellow, and boy do they put in the work to let you know it. Each song has a way of unfolding itself around the voices of Zach, Kanene, and Brian. It's hard not to get lost in the melodic flow and gracious harmonies that appear throughout this project and the way that each of these three accompany one another, yet hold their own entirely is something that simply cannot be explained and is better left to be deciphered by ear. This album is packed with both simplicity and sophistication, with matched undertones of soulful lonliness with a bit of sorrow sprinkled throughout. To be completely honest, we could go on forever about this album but when all is said and done, you just have to listen to it to understand. So hey, why don't you do just that and join us as we listen and dig into one hell of an album that more people should absolutely be aware of. It's season 5, episode 14 of your last Uber Eats driver's mother-in-law's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When it comes to a song, the only person that truly knows exactly what the song is about is the songwriter themselves, but that never stops us from not only filling in our own lyrics, but also trying to wholeheartedly decipher the songs meaning all together. We try, we try again, and we often fail. It's okay, we're going to keep this one short and sweet so you can get back to attempting to sing along to that Pearl Jam song in rush hour traffic, and you know damn well you have no idea what Eddie is saying. Sometimes we take that failure to a new level and use a specific song that we think means one thing but actually means another as lets say, our wedding song (oops!). A mistake that is easily made, but not as easily forgotten. In fact, some of the most well-known songs that have been in our musical air supply for what seems like forever are about something completely different than you've been thinking. If you've made it this far into the description, chances are you've already thought of a couple of songs that you once thought meant something much different than what was intended. This week we dig into that exact thing. From lyrics we've butchered over the years, to figuring out what specific songs are actually about. It turns out that one Ben Folds song you all know so well isn't actually about a Brick after all. It's season 5, episode 13 of Michelle's personal rap slang translator's favorite music podcast. This ones for you Spaghetti Hands! LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's that time again where we let you the listener choose an album, we listen, and then we tell you what we think. Honestly, this has become one of our favorite parts of the show. More often than not, we end up listening to something we otherwise might have passed up, and sometimes Michelle even finds something new to put into her rotation (which is a win-win for everyone).The eighties were a special time in music history, and we've talked about this before when we covered 1984 pretty extensively a few episodes back. Sure, 1984 was lit (I think we can all agree on that), but the trend continued on for quite a while. By the time 1987 rolled around, things within the industry were starting to shift. You might think that this would make for a rather difficult time to try and leave your mark on the world with a debut album, but singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Sananda Francesco Maitreya formerly known as Terence Trent D'Arby thought otherwise. In the summer of 1987, "Introducing the Hardline According to Terence Trent D'Arby" was unleashed upon the world, and almost immediately was met with critical acclaim. This was D'Arby's debut album, and he wasn't about to leave anything off of the table when it came to letting the masses know what he was all about. The album almost immediately hit #1 in the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. Worldwide, the album sold a million copies within the first three days of going on sale, and would eventually become a hit in the US as well, though they were a bit slower to catch on. Nearly every single that was released spent at least some time on one music chart or another. The album would reach platinum sales status in several countries, with it eventually going 5x platinum in the UK. It would appear that Sananda knew what he was doing when it came to putting together a debut project. The album would go on to be nominated for several different awards, and would eventually take home the Grammy for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance in 1988. What a way to introduce yourself to the industry. Join us as we time travel a bit and dig into one hell of a debut album, by an extremely talented artist. It's season 5, episode 12 of what should now be your favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If it seems like the music industry is more crowded than ever, and that's because when it comes down to it, compared to other times throughout music history, it really is. Much of this is due to how we consume music now (thanks streaming platforms), or how the industry's labels no longer have a stranglehold on who and what we all hear (thanks Obama, I mean the internet). It would appear that it's easier than ever to get your music out there if you're an artist because of how diluted the industry currently is, but that's not always the case. We're sure you've run across an artist or band that you immediatly thought should have been way further up the musical totem pole than they were. It's often hard to understand how someone who is so talented could remain otherwise unoticed in an industry full of people who severely lack any sort of musical talent in general, but have no problem reeling your kids in with catchy TikTok songs.Truth be told, there are a million and one reasons why you have to constantly explain to people around you who your favorite artist is. This week we attempt to unpack why some make it to the top, and some that are equally or even more talented fall by the wayside. While in some instances it's self imposed for all kinds of reasons (mainly creative freedom) that is mostly not the case. The music industry works in myseterious ways, and while your success in the industry was once based on a hell of a lot of hard work and a bit of luck, things are a little bit different now.What do you guys think about this? Do you find yourselves having to explain who your favorite artists are to others? Let's chat! Find us on the interwebs, and tell us what you think! We can be the next in line for who you have to explain your favorite artists to. It's season 5, episode 11 of your favorite mall cop's mistress' favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
From time to time, a new album comes along and becomes so popular that it almost forces itself into the culture whether they like it or not. It's almost like it becomes part of our air supply and no matter where you turn, hearing it, is unavoidable. I know a million and one albums probably come to mind when thinking about it, and this particular album is no different.Some Nights is the second full album offered up by American pop rock group Fun. After freshly landing a new record deal with Fueled By Ramen, the band began the nine-month process of recording "Some Nights". Initially met with critical reception, and mixed reviews but that didn't stop the singles from the album from ending up everywhere. Picked up and covered by the wildly popular television show Glee, "We Are Young" would start a trail of fire that wouldn't fizzle out for quite some time."We Are Young" would then find its way into a brand new Chevrolet commercial that aired for the first time during Super Bowl XLVI, which lead to a level of exposure only a few musical acts ever get to witness for themselves. The song would also be performed at the MTV Movie Awards on June 4, 2012.Not only is "Some Nights" brilliantly written, but it's also brilliantly performed. Lead Singer Nate Ruess very much has become synonymous with the sound that "Fun." has, and the band itself wouldn't be the same without him. Whether or not the type of music they make is "your thing", you simply cannot deny the power that this album wields. At one point, you couldn't turn on your local radio station without hearing three or four songs off of this album."We Are Young" topped the US Billboard Hot 100 for six weeks and Alternative Songs for two weeks, with over six million digital downloads. The title track was commissioned as the second single and has reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, selling 6.8 million digital downloads as well as becoming their second No. 1 on Alternative Songs. The band later would go on to win the Grammy Award for Best New Artist, and "We Are Young" won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year. Fun received four other Grammy nominations: two for "We Are Young" and two for the album itself. To say that this album was a commercial success would be putting it lightly. Join us as we again take a gander at an album many of you may not have ever listened to all the way through, but by the time we're done there is going to be a good chance that you'll want to. It's season 5, episode 10 of Nate Reuss' pet spider monkey's exercise coach's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Disclaimer: This is a two-part episode, and it is recommended that you go back and start with part one before diving into this episode. When talking about the chronological history of music and its importance, more often than not a few years, in particular, will come up. Though all music history and the timeline overall are extremely important there are a few periods that absolutely stand out and outshine the rest.1984 is one of those years.You may be thinking to yourself, "well yeah, but there are a ton of different times in music how can you just focus on one in particular?" Well, the short answer is, we absolutely agree, but in order to prevent us from joining the likes of Joe Rogan and hoping you'll listen to 3-hour episodes of our podcast, we have to pick and choose to focus on certain things. Furthermore, more often than not topics like these that we focus on are brought to us by you, the listener (which is the case here).With that being said, 1984 was such a monster year in music that we've had to break this episode into two parts, similar to how we handled our discussion about 1991. I said we'd continue trucking along into this episode, and that's exactly what we're doing this week. This is part two of us taking it all the way back to 1984.To some of you, 1984 might have been the year you graduated high school, the year you were born, or the year you trusted that fart and shouldn't have. To others, this is one of the most powerhouse years that the music industry has had to offer us, and with good reason. Instead of spoiling this entire episode by listing off what we talked about, how about you just go listen so that I can keep my internship. It's season 5, episode 9 of Matt Pinfield's tortoise sitter's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When talking about the chronological history of music and its importance, more often than not a few years, in particular, will come up. Though all music history and the timeline overall are extremely important there are a few periods that absolutely stand out and outshine the rest.1984 is one of those years.You may be thinking to yourself, "well yeah, but there are a ton of different times in music how can you just focus on one in particular?" Well, the short answer is, we absolutely agree, but in order to prevent us from joining the likes of Joe Rogan and hoping you'll listen to 3-hour episodes of our podcast, we have to pick and choose to focus on certain things. Furthermore, more often than not topics like these that we focus on are brought to us by you, the listener (which is the case here).With that being said, 1984 was such a monster year in music that we've had to break this episode into two parts, similar to how we handled our discussion about 1991. So this week we're diving headfirst into Part 1 and will continue trucking along into Part 2 next week.To some of you, 1984 might have been the year you graduated high school, the year you were born, or the year you trusted that fart and shouldn't have. To others, this is one of the most powerhouse years that the music industry has had to offer us, and with good reason. Instead of spoiling this entire episode by listing off what we talked about, how about you just go listen so that I can keep my internship. It's season 5, episode 8 of Kurt Loder's cat sitter's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
When you hear the name Kanye West, a million different people are bound to have a million different thoughts and opinions. Kanye is no stranger to controversy and being in the media headlines, and though that is where he currently is hanging out (and where he often finds himself, whether he likes it or not), this episode is about so much more than that—in fact, this episode has nothing to do with the Kanye you're hearing about today. Let's take it back a few years, and start from there. In 2009, Kanye began recording what would eventually become My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy during a self-imposed exile in Hawaii. Starting with such album titles as "Good Ass Job" and "Dark Twisted Fantasy", but after some back and forth he ultimately decided on the title we've come to know today. During the time of creating this album, Kanye spent around three million dollars recording the album, making it one of the most expensive albums ever made at the time. Commissioning George Condo for the album artwork, hosting an array of different guest producers, and lining up some monster artists for features on the album, it would appear that Kanye had a clear vision for what he wanted the album to become. It turns out that all of the time, money, and effort would pay off in the long run. My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy hit number 1 on the Billboard 200 and sold 496,000 copies in its first week. The album ultimately spent 115 weeks on the Billboard 200, and by July 2013, it had sold 1,351,000 copies in the US. By June 2011, the album was the second best-selling digital rap album ever, selling 483,000 digital copies. By November 23, 2020, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy would go on to be certified triple platinum by the RIAA for three million shipments in the US, and later that same year, it was reported that the album had been played one billion times on Spotify alone. To say that this album was a success would be a severe understatement, and no matter your thoughts on Kanye himself, you simply cannot deny the raw talent the guy possesses. His art, whether it be music, fashion, or pretty much anything he puts his mind to will continue to push boundaries and will be around for the foreseeable future, there is no denying that. So join us as we take a dive into the only album that Kyle has rated a 9 so far (that has to be good for something). It's season 5, episode 7 of Harvey Levin's personal tailor's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: This episode contains spoilers. If you have not seen "That Thing You Do!" it is recommended that you check out the movie before heading into this episode. If you don't care, then by all means carry on my wayward son.It's not often we dive into movies, and usually, when we do it's because they directly relate to music, or we simply just enjoy the film itself—or both, well yeah pretty much always both, haha. That being said, this is another one of those episodes so let's dig in. This time we're taking it back to 1996, with Tom Hanks not only sitting in the director's chair but also starring in the hit comedy "That Thing You Do!". The film is set in the 1960s and tells the story of the rise and fall of the fictional "one-hit wonder" pop band The Oneders (Wonders). Though this is a fictional story about the fictional band the one hit the band had in the movie would see actual success in real life, and would go on to be nominated for not only an Academy Award but also a Golden Globe for "Best Original Song".The movie tells the origin story of the band itself, and then also focuses on all of the trials and tribulations that fame brings. Something that pretty much anyone in the music industry can most certainly relate to. This film could absolutely serve as a bio-pic for (insert any old band here), and it's rather disheartening to see that very little has changed in the music business as I sit here today typing this some 60+ years later. So what happens to the band, and what do we think about this cult classic? Maybe you're wondering if this film sells the time period well, or if Tom Hanks is any good a directing? Maybe not. Well we're certain you'd like to know (at least something), but we have to keep the lights on around here, so really honestly the only way for you to find out is to tune in and immersive yourselves into this not too deep, yet not so shallow dive into a film we think everyone should see at least once. It's season 5, episode 6, and my dog ate the last part of this description. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If you're not familiar with the name Kelly Clarkson, there is a large chance that you either live in a cave somewhere or possibly deep in the foothills of West Virginia. For the rest of you, hearing that name probably makes you think one of a few things. If I had to guess, your first thought was when Steve Carell was having his body waxed in that scene from The 40 Year Old Virgin, and yells out her name as a defense mechanism to deal with the pain. Beyond that, she's also very well known for winning the first season of American Idol, all the way back in 2002. Truthfully, now some 20 years later, Kelly Clarkson has become so much more than a name from a funny scene in a movie, or the winner from a very washed up and played out American tv show. For starters, she's sold more than 25 million albums and 45 million singles worldwide. She has 11 top-ten singles in the US, and nine top-ten singles in the UK, Canada, and Australia. She also became the first artist in history to top each of Billboard's pop, adult contemporary, adult pop, country, and dance charts. She's worked her way on to multiple tv shows and ended up hosting her own talk show starting in 2019, appropriately titled "The Kelly Clarkson Show". To say that she's had a successful career in the industry would be a real understatement, but there has been a lot that has happened behind the scenes that many weren't aware of until she released her latest studio album, Meaning of Life. For the first time in her career, she was allowed to be herself and she did just that. She seemingly exploded into being allowed to finally be the artist that she had always wanted to be and we couldn't be more pleased. You'd be hard-pressed to find better work in her catalog because she just lets it all loose. A final farewell perhaps to an industry/label that not only made her but held her back as well. Join us as we dig into this masterfully orchestrated album, and see if you can guess ahead of time how much Michelle likes this album more than she does Pet Sounds. It's season 5, episode 5 of Kelly Clarkson's personal assistant's, makeup artist's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
**SPECIAL EPISODE ALERT** This episode is a special solo effort from Russ being released on June13th for a very specifc reason. All information and messaging within this episode is approved and endorsed by Kyle & Michelle, but the topic is sensitive enough to where we thought it was best to be handled as a solo, informational piece.Over the course of this episode, we hope you learn something new regarding the news stories that reguarly surround Michael Jackson. We also hope that you take the time to reflect on some of the questions raised during this episode. This special episode contains a fact based discussion along with mentions of several resources where you can find out more information. Listener feedback is very important to us so our regular format will return next week. We will have your feedback from our Songs of Summer episode along with Our Jammy Jams per usual. For now, please just listen to the facts within this episode and make sure to share it out with others so the truth can run marathons.
From time to time our episodes aren't planned ahead of time, and the ideas pop up from things that might happen in our daily lives. This is one of those episodes."Grampa Kyle" seemed to have blown a musical gasket a few weeks back when he heard the new single from one of his favorite rappers. After a fury of messages, examples of old videos, and a bunch of gibberish sounding like an old man that just realized Neil Young had his music pulled from Spotify (which was the only reason he had his Grandson sign him up to begin with). Russ immediately was like okay this is going to be an episode, and well hey would ya look at that—here we are. Genre hopping in the music industry is certainly nothing new, and some would say it's more common than ever nowadays. Sometimes it happens right before your ears, and you don't even realize it right away. Some artists even take the transition head-on and talk about it in their songs. It seems like those that have the biggest issues with artists hopping around and experimenting with other genres are the die-hard fans that just can't imagine their favorite band or artist sounding any different than what they've become accustomed to, and though that's totally understandable—it's unrealistic if you're looking at them as an actual artist that needs to express themselves and experiment with different mediums. In some cases, an artist will use whatever persona the industry has given them to make them a success and once they reach that pinnacle, they do a 180 and take their true fans with them on quite an adventurous trip. On the other hand, there are artists that reach that pinnacle of their career, and they see that the checks that are cashing for the other guys are much bigger so they make a transition for financial gain hoping they can fit right in on the other side and make it rain. There are of course a myriad of examples we could list here, but then what reason would you have to listen to the show? Besides wanting to hear our beautiful voices of course. I'm willing to bet, as you've been reading this, more than one name has come to mind—because everyone knows of someone who fits into this category. Now, come join us as we discuss this whole situation and see if we can get "Grandpa Kyle" to take a nap so he'll settle down. It's season 5, episode 4 of Daniel Ek's personal driver's (who he just had to let go) favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
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Jan 17th
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