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Infectious Groove Podcast

Infectious Groove Podcast

Author: OddPods Media Network

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We love music. You love music. Let's talk about it. From current events, crazy show stories, what we're currently listening to, and anything else that is on our minds—there may even be a special guest on to answer all of your burning questions.

The only way to know is to tune in weekly and find out.
88 Episodes
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Record Store Day draws thousands of line ladened music fanatics from all over the world, and with good reason and intention, but why? Who wants to stand in line (surely not Michelle) to try and get their hands on a record that— wait better yet, who even listens to records anyhow? The answer, a hell of a lot of people, that's who and the number is growing. Started in 2007 as a way to celebrate and spread the word about the unique culture that exists around and within independently owned record shops. The very first Record Store Day was held on April 19th, 2008 and now Record Store Day has now spread across the globe, to literally everywhere except Antarctica. What used to be a rather small community of supposed "music snobs", the vinyl collecting community has exploded in recent years, with no intention of slowing down. But with this explosion, comes money, and with money comes corporate America wanting their piece of the vinyl pie. More people buying more records is a wonderful thing until it isn't. Thus far Record Store Day has been reserved for smaller independent establishments, but it's only a matter of time until corporate America comes looking for a way to cash in. Big retail giants like Wal-Mart and Target are already getting a taste of just how lucrative the vinyl market can be with all of their special releases and exclusive colors that they have been releasing. Where does this lead? Only time will tell. Over the years, Record Store Day has become not only the time of year that we all line up for exclusive records that have never been pressed or released but it's also become that one time every year where we get to meet new people and see old friends that we otherwise wouldn't have gotten to know if it weren't for that pesky old wait in line at the local record shop. If corporate America does force its way in, things will surely change and the Record Store Day we know today will most likely be a thing of the past. This week we're talking RSD, the past, present, and what the future might hold. It's season four, episode three of your favorite vape shop salesman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Yes, Kings Of Leon recently released an album, and no you should absolutely not start there if you want to dig into their catalog more. Do us, and yourself a favor and leave that album sitting by itself on the shelf at Wal-Mart.It's SEASON FOUR! I know right, HOLY $H!T IT'S SEASON FOUR!!! We hope you enjoyed the premiere episode last week—we know Seth did. With Season Four, comes the continuation of our album review series where we pick an album, listen to it tirelessly, and then pick it apart. Fun right? When you read the title you were probably like, "Kings Of Leon? You mean the Sex On Fire guys? Wtf is Mechanical Bull?". It's okay, we understand. For most of you, Kings Of Leon probably started with "Sex On Fire", and ended with "Use Somebody". You're certainly not alone but the crazy thing is, is that those songs were on their FOURTH ALBUM! Yes, you read that right, their fourth album is what everyone knows them for, which to us is just insane. They not only had three FULL albums before they found commercial success, but they also snuck two EP's in there as well. If KOL lack anything, it sure isn't work ethic. The funny thing is, the band continued to work just as hard sticking to what they were good at even after they found success. You might be saying "yeah but all of their songs sound the same, that's why they fell off", and you're not wrong. Yes, their songs all do sound very similar, and there is definitely that KOL sound that they have mastered over the years. Where you're wrong is, that's the beauty of the band. A consistent, reliable sound, wrapped around often times great and thoughtful lyrics (that would be easier to understand if the lead singer wasn't eating PB&J sandwiches while recording, but that's neither here nor there). What more could one ask for from a band they enjoy listening to? So where does this lead us? Well in this particular situation leads us to their sixth studio album, Mechanical Bull—which as Russ and Kyle were recently reminded, is a damn fantastic one at that. Even after all of their commercial success with their fourth album, and after all of their fire sex fizzled out they still put forth all of the efforts as if they were still trying to make it big. Why? Well, our guess is, not only are they talented as hell—but Kings of Leon have mastered sounding like and being Kings Of Leon and they do it in such a masterful and consistent way that you just simply cannot turn away once you start listening. This week we take a deep dive into Mechanical Bull, and try and figure out what it is about this band and this album that makes it so we just can't get enough. The good, the bad, and the stinky—it's season 4, episode two of your favorite honky-tonk bucking machine operator's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It Was All A Dream

It Was All A Dream

2021-07-0558:16

It's Season 4, and we're BACK—but don't call it a comeback, because you know damn well we never really left! In the Season 4 premiere, we've got Russ in-studio with Michelle and Kyle joining remotely from Babyland—the land of milk, sharts, and tired cries. So bear with us as it might sound like they're on the phone (because they are), and the sound quality you're used to might sound a bit different this go around. Have you ever wished you had the chance to attend a particular concert, or see a particular artist perform and you've just never gotten around to it? Maybe the artist passed away before you had the chance to see them live, or maybe you're like Michelle, and concert ticket prices are just too damn high. This week Russ presented the crew with an excellent question: If you could attend any artist's show (living, dead, almost dead, etc.) who would it be? Think of it as a dream show, with a dream line-up. An Opening Act of our choice, followed by a Headliner—don't mind if we do. You're probably thinking about how easy it would be to try and come up with a good answer, and for someone like Russ (who's seen more live music than some working musicians) it may be, but just sit and think for a second and we bet you'll change your mind at least 5 times, maybe even 10 times. So join us (while you're still changing your mind) as we create our own fantasy live music line-up, and explain why we chose who we did. Kyle even creates his very own music festival. It's the Season 4 premiere of your favorite Youtube vinyl collector's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If you asked any of the three of us just a short time ago if we would be wrapping up the third season of our podcast, and working our way into a fourth—we most likely would have just laughed and changed the subject. It's all still a bit surreal that we are able to sit here and do this, and you all want to continue to listen. Without all of you, we wouldn't be where we are today—so thank you, really. We've decided to wrap up season 3 by continuing our album review series. For many of us, when Iceland is mentioned, one of the first things that come to mind is The Mighty Ducks—or maybe that's just me. Either way, in the sequel the team's arch-nemesis is a hockey team from Iceland. We also learned (from the movie) that Greenland is covered with ice, and Iceland is very nice! Known widely as "the Land of Fire and Ice", Iceland is known for many things but here in America, we don't usually hear a lot from them within the mainstream music channels. It turns out that they may have as much to offer musically as they do visually and culturally. Fresh out of Mosfellsbær, Iceland, KALEO (pronounced KAL-EO, or KA-LE-O, or even KUH-LEE-OW), we still have not one damn clue how to officially pronounce their name—we've been struggling with this for some time now, and there doesn't seem to be an end in sight. KALEO (however you'd like to pronounce it in your head while reading this) exploded onto the Icelandic music scene in 2012 and quickly worked its way into the ears of fans all over the world. Over the years they have continued to progress with their music, and Surface Sounds is a perfect example of that. Surface Sounds is the band's third official album and their latest offering. Initially slated for release in early 2020, Surface Sounds was postponed for a year due to the worldwide pandemic. If you're familiar with KALEO and their earlier works then you are well on your way to enjoying this one as well. If you heard us try and pronounce their name on air yet again, and wondered to yourself "who in the hell is that?", then this is where you start. Start here, and work your way backward into their catalog—then thank us later. Or just thank us now, however you'd prefer—we're not picky. The good, the bad, the ugly, us continuously trying to say their name correctly and failing miserably. This episode has it all. Plus it's the season 3 finale so just listen to it already will ya? It's season 3 episode 21 of your favorite labor and delivery Nurse's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's not every day that someone mentions something positive and Ohio in the same sentence—but there are a few exceptions now and again. When you think of Ohio you might think of Cedar Point, Lebron James, The O'Jays, Tracy Chapman, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, The Ohio Players, The Black Keys, or Screamin' Jay Hawkins just to name a few. You typically don't think of something that Ohio has that you really cannot find anywhere else but nestled neatly within Cleveland's city limits lives The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame—you may or may not have heard of such a place. Famous for their museum of musical artifacts, their spaghetti dinners, and inductees that oftentimes make no sense. The Rock Hall as many call it has become a go-to tourist attraction for music lovers all over the world. Started by Ahmet Ertegun in 1983 as a way to showcase and honor musical acts and history within the music industry, Cleveland became the Rock Hall's permanent home in 1986 with the museum itself being dedicated in 1995. Over the years the Rock Hall has found itself in the midst of controversy, whether it be about how "the board" makes its inductee selections, the inductees themselves, racism, sexism, the way they conduct business in general, or their weird "spaghetti" dinners they host to raise money. They've even been accused of displaying replica artifacts while trying to pass them off as the real thing. This week we're back talking about this year's inductees, award winners, and whether or not anyone seems to care about the Rock Hall in general anymore. If you haven't listened to our other episode which is about the Rock Hall in general, we encourage you to do so as well. Also, if you haven't heard, Kyle couldn't care less about anyone or anything trying to tell him what is cool or what music he should appreciate. Come hang with us as we tackle The Rock Hall once again! It's season 3, episode 20 of your favorite ticket scalper's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
It's 2001 but don't call it a comeback, even though so many did at the time. It had been six years since Michael Jackson had released an album and the anticipation was eating his fans alive. Having endured years of media scrutiny people wondered if he still had it, or if he was going to stay out of the limelight for good. Not only did Michael still have it, but he also had some things he still needed to get off his chest, and that is exactly what he did. Recorded over a period of four years, while spending a reported $30 million dollars to perfect what would be his last studio album. Invincible set out to prove that Michael was just that, and he was going to let everyone (whether they wanted to hear it or not) know about it. Having been continuously harassed and terrorized by the media and various extortionists, Michael showed everyone that he was once again an unstoppable force to be reckoned with. Many would say that musically, Michael could do no wrong, and pretty much everything he involves himself with turns to gold—but this wasn't necessarily the case when Invincible was released. Met with a wide variety of criticism initially it seemed as though Michael's last offering, was surely not his best. Many blame the ongoing conflicts between him and his record label at the time for causing the issues that lead to little to no promotion of the album, and no worldwide tour to support its release. While those things absolutely impacted the initial success and acceptance of the album as a whole, others were left thinking to themselves "what about the song sequencing though?"—and with that very valid point, we at IGP are with you on that one. As a continuation of our ongoing album review series, join us as we take a dive into exactly what made MJ so invincible after all. The haves, the have-nots, the stinky pinkys, the wonky stonks, and the absolute F@!%ING JAMS (because there are more than a few). It's season 3, episode 19 of Chris Tucker's first wife's second cousin's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO!!! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Road To Nowhere

Road To Nowhere

2021-05-2401:02:09

WARNING: This episode contains sensitive subject matter about mental health and suicide. This may be a trigger for some listeners of the show. If you or someone you know is struggling with or having thoughts of suicide, there is help available 24/7 at the number listed below.National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - 800-273-8255 You're 18 years old, and you've just gotten the call. Your band has been invited to go on the road and open for one of the biggest rock bands on the planet. This is the moment you've been waiting for. You gather the band, figure out some logistical stuff, pack your van to the gills with equipment and head out. The first show is only about an eight-hour drive, so you leave early allowing yourself more than enough time to get there and get set up. You're nervous, excited, unsure of the future, you've never played a show that wasn't a local bar or club—this is a whole new animal that you're more than willing to try and tame. First tour show #5 - You're already starting to lose track of where you are and where you're headed next. Sleeping in the van is getting old, but the hotel after-parties, girls, unlimited amounts of booze, and drugs are exactly what you had been dreaming of. First tour show #15 - You're now in a bit of a rhythm (if you can even call it that), you and the guys pooled enough money together to start staying in cheap motels instead of being in that cramped disgusting van. Things are looking up even though you're already exhausted. Parties, girls, drinks, drugs, let's go! First tour show #31 - What day is this? What city are you in? Who even knows anymore? Part of the band has been sleeping in motels, part in the van. Who knew this much time together would put your relationships to the test? The parties, the girls, the booze, and the drugs—they're all still there, but mentally you're not. You've been calling early nights lately, and locking your door when you do so. You never thought this whole new animal would be so difficult to tame. Fast forward 30 years... Your band lineup has changed multiple times over the years, you've lost countless friends to drugs, alcohol, and suicide but you're still at it, still grinding, still playing, still creating, and still making it happen. Music money is structured differently these days, which means more time on the road, and less time with the wife and kids. The parties, girls, booze, and drugs are all still there but you've been sober for longer than you can remember, so that's neither here nor there. You also make sure you get a good room in a good hotel, or atleast a comfy spot on the bus, because let's face it you're too old to not know where you're going to be laying your head at night. You and the guys are gearing up for another stint on the road to support your latest effort. The fans are eager, and the bills won't pay themselves.You're almost 50 years old now, and you've just taken a call that you never imagined you'd be taking. All shows. All Tours. All everything. Cancelled. There is a virus, it's spreading fast, and you cannot risk your safety or the safety of the general public. For the first time in 30 years, you're left wondering, what's next? No schedule, no grind, no jet lag, no tour bus, no playing for thousands of adoring fans, no meet and greets, no shows. One week turns into two, two turns into twelve, and before you know it, it's been a year. You've had an entire year to find yourself, to just sit, to eat breafast with your wife, watch your kids graduate from colllege, to start a workout regimen, find a show on Netflix you truly like. But you're not truly out of the game, you find a way to keep the music going—the internet. You and the guys, much like everyone else have started performing virtually for fans from all across the globe. You've also started teaching master classes for paying fans that hope to gain the knowledge of someone whos been in "the biz" since he can remember. These are all ways of paying those bills that refuse to pay themselves but without having to grind yourself into mental pulp while doing it. For the first time in 30 years, you can take a deep breath, and relax.Fast forward 1 year...Vaccines are happening. People are feeling safe again, and the fans are eager for a live show. Venues (or what's left of them) are slowly opeing back up. The label is eager to get you and the guys back together, and back on the road. One by one, artist after artist, friend after friend, start to annouce tour after tour. But is it safe? They say it's safe enough. "But what if I'm not ready?" you ask yourself. You're nervous, excited, and unsure of the future. You remeber this feeling. Your mind begins to race... Tour, van, bus, hotel, motel, parties, girls, booze (you've been sober for years), drugs (look you're sober, relax!), studio, album, tour, van, bus, hotel, parties. Your mind is racing as fast as your heart. "Am I having a heart attack?" you ask yourself. "Is this an axiety attack? Am I f!@#ing dying here? After all this?" you say under your breath. Nope you're not dying, but it is an axiety attack. You've spent the last year, unpacking 30 years worth of music industry baggage and damn did it feel good. You've made money (lots of money) using the tools you've learned over the lockdown and you haven't had grind yourself into nothing while doing it. You know what you need to do. You know you're feeling better than ever, and you know you're done with the long haul. Now it's time to tell the rest of the world... It's season 3, epsiode 18 of your favorite retired touring musician's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
If you're a regular listener of the podcast, then you know by now that we've been regularly doing album review episodes where we pick an album, dive in, and tell all of you what we think about what we were forced to listen to. This is one of those episodes and Kyle hit the crew with a curveball this week when he picked Miguel's fourth studio album WAR & LEISURE for everyone to take a listen to.When you hear the name Miguel you are probably thinking one of two things—who in the world is Miguel or Isn't that the guy who landed on and supposedly injured someone in the audience when trying to jump from one part of the stage to another at the Billboard Music Awards? Yes, that Miguel. That's the guy, but when broken down Miguel is so much more than a TMZ headline. Miguel typically stays hidden from the forefront of the R&B music scene despite releasing very successful singles and albums over the years featuring some of the industry's biggest names, and that's okay because he hones in on what he is good at, perfecting his craft along the way. If you've been a fan of Miguel since he came on to the scene in 2010, then you've been able to appreciate his growth as an artist with every album that has been released since then. If you're tuning in and hearing about Miguel for the first time, it's highly encouraged that you go back to the beginning and listen to some of his earlier music so you can hear his growth as an artist for yourself. War & Leisure is the fourth studio album from singer, songwriter, and producer Miguel. Featuring guest appearances from Travis Scott, Rick Ross, J. Cole, and Kali Uchis just to name a few. The album was met with critical acclaim peaking at #1 on Billboard's Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums chart and #9 on the Billboard 200. Selling 40,000 units in the first week, and eventually being certified Gold by the RIAA for selling 500,000 units. Join us as we dig in and find out exactly how much Miguel had to offer us with this one. The bad, the good, and the stinky. We cover it all on season 3, episode 17 of your baby mama's new baby daddy's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Snob - noun 1. a person who imitates, cultivates, or slavishly admires social superiors and is condescending or overbearing to others. 2. a person who believes himself or herself an expert or connoisseur in a given field and is condescending toward or disdainful of those who hold other opinions or have different tastes regarding this field: i.e. a music snob. All snobs are not created equal, and their levels of snobbery can differ greatly depending on what they are being snobby about. I think we can all agree that some of the worst snobs that one can come across in the wild is, yup you guessed it—the elusive music snob. You know, the guy that knows more than anyone else about music in general, and has to let you know about it every chance he gets? You know, the guy that thinks everyone who doesn't appreciate music as much as he does is just another moron that he has to deal with every day? We all know those guys, hell some of us have even been those guys at some point in our lives. Where does this type of snobbery come from? Passion? Arrogance? Privilege? This week we take a dive into a subject that hits especially close to home. Think of it as a bit of a roundtable discussion with a few recovering music snobs. How did it start? How bad did it get And how the hell have we've gotten this far? The bad, the good, and a funny Russ story or two. We break it all down this week. It's season 3, episode 16 of your favorite Doorman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Oh, we almost forgot to ask, do you even music bro!?!? Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Brand New as a band has been called a lot of things (Emo, Punk, etc.), but one thing you won't find anyone calling them is brand new. Yes, that was a bad dad joke and no, I do not regret it. Formed in 2000, the band has been around the block a time or two, and they are largely considered to be one of the most influential bands in the early 2000's "emo" music scene—let's be honest here, if you were there, then you already know. It was in 2003 when the band released their second studio effort to the masses. This was also the first album where the band decided to switch its sound up from what fans had gotten used to with their debut release "Your Favorite Weapon" which sold over 50,000 copies but not nearly as much as they had hoped. "Deja Entendu" which is French for "already heard" debuted at number 63 on the Billboard 200, and after just 7 weeks sold more than 51,000 copies already closing in on the total figure of its predecessor. Deja Entendu was a welcomed change for the fans of the band, and its popularity opened up new doors and industry opportunities —which resulted in the band being signed to their first major record label. Up to that point, the band had been riding the indie record label wave and hadn't caught the eye of the major players in the music industry. By 2007, four years after its release "Deja Entendu" was certified Gold by the RIAA for surpassing 500,000 sales in the United States. You can love them, you can hate them—hell you can even love to hate them, but you certainly cannot deny their influence on the early 2000's emo/rock scene as a whole. You've almost certainly heard at least one of their songs on your local radio station, and watched at least one of their music videos on MTV after you got out of school. This week we take it back to High School and dig into what it was (or wasn't) that made us latch on to what Brand New was willing to offer up at the time. It's season 3, episode 15 of your favorite retired Warped Tour roadie's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
What do you get when you combine a decent screenplay based on personal experiences, a director with a specific vision for bringing that screenplay to life, and a controlling movie studio just looking to cash in on the latest movie craze? Simply put, you get what eventually became the cult classic Empire Records. This film is many things for many people but when all is said and done it seems like it's a film that's "just there" for most. Chances are you've seen this film at some point since its 1995 debut, and if you were one of the lucky ones who got to see it in one of 87 theaters it played in—you should probably play the lottery more often, just make damn sure it's not on Rex Manning Day. You've been warned. What was supposed to be the next big hit music-based film, with a huge theatrical debut and a killer soundtrack to follow, turned into the movie studio/production company doing little to no promotion for the film, taking control of the direction of the film, and turning that huge theatrical debut into a theatrical release that was a fraction of what was originally planned. Oh and that killer soundtrack that was supposed to accompany the film turned into a hodgepodge of random songs—many having nothing at all to do with the actual film itself. But why? How did a film with such potential turn into a bastardized version of what could have been? This week we take a look at (and attempt to unpack) what the hell happened with this train wreck turned cult classic, and try and get Russ to look beyond his love for music and enjoy the film for what it is—a feel-good film, with simple but interesting character dynamics, witty one-liners, and an overall message of sticking it to "the man". It's season 3 episode 14 of your favorite record store owner's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Prince was many things to many people. A legend. An icon. An extremely talented musician. A man who lived his life shrouded in mystery. But most importantly Prince was an artist—but not just your average run-of-the-mill artist. Prince knew who he was through and through and never tried to be something that he wasn't. Prince was an artist that refused to be labeled and boxed into anything but what he created for himself. One may wonder how someone (no matter how talented they are) would be able to create an album that would match the success of Purple Rain—but that's just it, Prince never worried about being able to live up to any sort of standard the music industry had set for him. He had already moved on and started working on new projects at the height of his success with Purple Rain. One of those projects became "Around The World In A Day" which he loosely started working on before Purple Rain became the Purple Rain that we all know and love. At the top of Purple Rain mountain, he was able to look at things a bit differently, and see that his label was going to milk Purple Rain for everything it was worth, and this was his chance to divert the masses to something new and exciting sounding—and that's exactly what he did. Around The World In A Day wasn't for everyone, hell Prince himself wasn't for everyone, but that was the point. Around The World In A Day was created first and foremost for Prince himself, and of course for his fans—as an open letter of sorts to let his true fans know that they were on the same musical wavelength. No Prince record would ever attain the success that Purple Rain did, but Prince didn't care, he had to stay true to himself and he knew the only way to do that was to go in the direction that Around The World In A Day would take him. This week we take a deep dive into Prince's seventh studio album and the second release where his backing band "The Revolution" was officially billed. Around The World In A Day takes us on what many would say is a psychedelic adventure of sorts. Come with us as we take this ride and decide how we all feel about it. It's season 3 episode 13 of your favorite Paisley Park aficionado's favorite music podcast. You're not going to want to miss this one. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Algorithmic Blues

Algorithmic Blues

2021-04-1201:05:591

TL;DR: The internet is both equally fascinating as it is a scary place, and Skynet might be closer than we once thought.The internet as we know it quite literally wouldn't be the internet without the use of algorithms. They're responsible for how we consume what we consume on our favorite forms of social media, and they're pretty much responsible for the ins and outs of how much of the internet works these days—and we're (humans, not this podcast) responsible for creating them. The advancement of technology is not only important, it's crucial for the advancement of society in general, but what happens when that gets out of control? What happens when an algorithm can teach itself and it no longer needs a human counterpart to gain intelligence? You might be thinking to yourself, didn't they make a movie about this exact type of thing?—and the answer is yes, they've made all sorts of movies based on technology getting out of control because of how careless humans are. Think The Terminator franchise, we're almost certain that everyone but Michelle has seen at least one of them. Skynet. Is. Terrifying. Yes, that's a film (or a series of films) and this is a music podcast—so what the hell am I talking about right? Again, I just want to state that I am the intern here, and I just do as I am told. Beyond that, we've reached a crossroad where technology and music have met yet again, but in a much stranger and almost creepier way than you might think. Algorithms have now been designed to isolate hooks, rhythms, melodies, and lyrics from some of your favorite artists and songs. Cool right? Well sure that sounds cool but here is where things start to get a little weird. Videos started popping up on sites all over the web that sounded like new or updated songs from artists we all know and love, but heres the catch, those artists never recorded any of the lyrics to those songs. When those algorithms isolate that stuff, they're then able to digitally recreate a song that sounds so similar to the real thing that if you didn't know ahead of time that it wasn't, you wouldn't know any different—and that's where the creepiness starts to come in. BUT WAIT! THERE'S MORE! Has this technology gone too far already? We thought so until we came across Over The Bridge, a company using this mind-blowing technology to spread mental health awareness throughout the music industry. How? Great question, but I have an even better answer—tune in and find out. It's season 3, episode 12 of your favorite algorithm's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
What seems like years ago, but in reality has just been a bit over a year now—everything stopped in its tracks. The world as we knew it stopped. Everything. Stopped. Once the dust settled we knew we were in for what seemed like a long haul, but none of us really knew how long of a haul we were actually in for. The world as a whole would never quite be the same, but the way a global pandemic would affect the music industry as a whole would be both a debilitating and revolutionary experience. Unable to tour, perform shows, properly record new music, artists found themselves at a particularly unique fork in the road—adapt or die. As fans, we had no clue and at that moment couldn't even fathom what the future would hold. Tours canceled, album releases pushed back—the music industry as we knew it had closed up shop. Much like the artists, music fans also found themselves at a particularly unique fork in the road—adapt or die, and that is exactly what everyone did. Artists and fans alike took to the internet and started using it in every way possible in order to push the industry forward. Live shows with a full band, became virtual solo shows held on a couch. Heading to the studio to work on an album turned into linking up with fellow artists and producers virtually via "Quarantine Studios" which was created by rapper Jim Jones and lets artists collaborate and record with one another in real-time with no virtual lag. No more live shows? No problem. Fans began to tune-in in record numbers to watch their favorite artists perform from the comfort of their own homes. With the inability to flip through bins at the local record store, people flooded online record retailers like never before—proving that even if things were the furthest from normal that they had ever been, fans and artists alike would figure it out, together. In this episode, we talk about how the pandemic has affected how we consume music overall, our listening habits, how we find new artists to check out, buy music, and so much more. You've been right there with us this whole time, so you're certainly not going to want to miss this one. It's season 3, episode 11 of your favorite frontline worker's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Due to the nature of this episode, it is recommended that you not only take a listen to the album being reviewed but that you also listen to that album at full volume so that you can fully immerse yourself. Thank you for listening and joining in on the discussion. Enjoy. This week we continue with our brand new album review series, where one of us picks an album, and we all take a crack at unpacking, picking apart, reviewing, and then repacking said album. Take a trip with us on this special episode of Infectious Groove Podcast. By the late 1970s, the popularity of The Rolling Stones was on a steady decline due to the fact that the music charts started to be largely dominated by disco and newer rock bands like Aerosmith and Kiss. Sprinkle in the rising UK punk rock movement which at the time led to most of the artists linked to the 1960s era feeling obsolete. The band had also failed to produce a critically acclaimed album since the early 70s. It was the perfect storm for a wildly successful rock band, to no longer be certain of where they fit in. That perfect storm led to Mick Jagger focusing creatively on the reinvigoration of the band as a whole. Using NYC as the main inspiration, "Some Girls" was born. Mick, widely regarded as the creative driving force behind the new album, had a vision of how he wanted to get the band back on track and back on the charts. Mick's vision paid off as "Some Girls" climbed the charts as a newly refreshed Stones lineup geared up for chart-topping success once again. "Some Girls" went on to reach No. 2 on the UK album charts and No. 1 on the US Billboard 200. It became the band's top-selling album in the US having been certified by the RIAA for selling 6 million copies by 2000. Some Girls was the 14th British and 16th American studio album by The Rolling Stones. It's jam-packed with a montage of hits that span a multitude of genres. Everything from Disco to Country, all the way down to that classic Stones sound that we know and love. Hit? Stinkers? Songs that were just meh? We break it all down on season 3, episode 10 of your favorite refrigerator repair man's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Forgive Or Forget

Forgive Or Forget

2021-03-2259:55

WARNING: This episode contains language and descriptions of situations regarding instances of individuals becoming infected with a very contagious music-based fever and possible sickness. Listen at your own risk. From a very young age we’re all taught that we grow, live, learn, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes and continue to grow—hell we even make the same mistakes twice, sometimes three times and that’s okay because we are living and learning along the way. This is all fine and good unless you beat the odds and rise to some sort of level of superstardom or fame. Because even though celebrities and influencers are human just like the rest of us, they are held to a much higher standard, and life is much less forgiving. Sprinkle in the many pieces that make up the internet, and you have a recipe for disaster. A recipe that if prepared just right can upend and destroy the best of careers—and for what? Just to prove the point that the person you’ve rallied everyone against has a differing opinion than you and your faithful keyboard warriors? How have we gotten to the point where the collective internet feels like they have the right to take from someone everything that they’ve spent their entire lives working toward? How have we gotten to a place where another human is held to such a high standard of living they aren’t allowed to make mistakes like the rest of us—even if they learn from those mistakes, and don’t make them again? How have we gotten to the point where lyrics in a song become more tangible to the internet than the actual negative actions and decisions that someone has made in real life? This becomes a slippery slope when we’re talking about the rights of an individual and the freedom of speech that they’re entitled to. Where do we draw the line? Canceling or “Cancel culture” as it’s often referred to is dangerous when used improperly and it seems like we’re dealing with the fallout from this on a daily basis. Where does this end? Is there an end? Is there even an answer as to how we fix the problem at hand? We talk this and more on season 3 episode 9 of your favorite internet sleuths favorite music podcast. LET’S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Women That Rock - Part 2

Women That Rock - Part 2

2021-03-1501:02:40

TL;DR: Women are music industry badasses. Disclaimer: This is the second and final part of our two-part episode on Women That Rock, so if you've ended up here and you haven't listened to part one, it is suggested you start there—or hell carry on doing what you do, it's up to you. Much like every other industry on earth, the music industry is dominated by old white guys that dictate who goes where, and what happens next. This has always been the case and is still the way things operate today. Throughout musical history, every so often a woman comes along and puts those old white guys in their place by showing them that the industry just wouldn't be the same without them. It might seem that due to the fact that the music industry is so heavily male-dominated that a female artist with any sort of talent at all gets noticed and becomes something—but it's quite the opposite. The women that are at the forefront of music, are the ones that deserve to be there, and they've had to work harder than everyone else to get where they are. It's Women's History Month and in the second and final part of this multi-part episode, we continue to break down and unpack what it is to be not only a woman in the music industry but also a woman that is an absolute badass within the music industry. In part 2, we continue with even more heavy hitters, and we didn't even get around to mentioning everyone that deserves a mention (sorry in advance). Which heavy hitters you might ask? Wouldn't you like to know? Truthfully the only way to know is by tuning in and finding out. And to be completely honest, I'm just an unpaid intern, so giving you hints definitely isn't in my best interest—I can only do so much here. It's season 3, episode 8 of your favorite Neighborhood Watch Block Captain's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Women That Rock - Part 1

Women That Rock - Part 1

2021-03-0801:04:29

TL;DR: Women are music industry badasses. Much like every other industry on earth, the music industry is dominated by old white guys that dictate who goes where, and what happens next. This has always been the case and is still the way things operate today. Throughout musical history, every so often a woman comes along and puts those old white guys in their place by showing them that the industry just wouldn't be the same without them. It might seem that due to the fact that the music industry is so heavily male-dominated that a female artist with any sort of talent at all gets noticed and becomes something—but it's quite the opposite. The women that are at the forefront of music, are the ones that deserve to be there, and they've had to work harder than everyone else to get where they are. It's Women's History Month and in the first part of this multi-part episode, we start to break down and unpack what it is to be not only a woman in the music industry but also a woman that is an absolute badass within the music industry. In part 1, we get right to it with some heavy hitters, and this is just the beginning. Which heavy hitters you might ask? Wouldn't you like to know? Truthfully the only way to know is by tuning in and finding out. And to be completely honest, I'm just an unpaid intern, so giving you hints definitely isn't in my best interest—I can only do so much here. It's season 3, episode 7 of your favorite Grammy Award Nominee's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
DISCLAIMER: Due to the nature of this episode, it is recommended that you not only take a listen to the album being reviewed but that you also listen to that album at full volume so that you can fully immerse yourself. Thank you for listening and joining in on the discussion. Enjoy.This week we're starting off with something a little different than what you might be used to. Every now and again we will be picking an album, taking a listen, and then taking a deep dive into discussing that album as a whole. This is our first crack at it. The 70's would be considered by many to be a rough time in our nation's history. Violence, protest, and hardship were at the forefront of everyone's thoughts. But it's the music that always ends up finding its way through to us no matter how hard times get, and this time was no different. Rough times make for great tunes, and John Fogerty knew exactly what he was doing when it came to translating the times at hand into monster hits. Creedance Clearwater Revival fans were in for a treat when "Cosmo's Factory" was released to the masses. Using his signature howling rasp, guitar, expert production, and intentional use of musical styles that both inspired and pushed the boundaries of what we were all used to hearing. Cosmo's Factory is the fifth album by Creedence Clearwater Revival and it's chocked full of howling vocals, crisp instrumentation, massive hits, and an eleven-minute version of a song that most of us believe doesn't need to be eleven minutes long. This week we unpack this album little by little and discuss our thoughts. It's season three, episode six of your favorite handyman's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
Growing Pains

Growing Pains

2021-02-2201:01:08

I think we can all agree that growing up is hard to do. I think we can all also agree that music makes growing a tad bit more tolerable. Often times we forget just how important music is when it comes to shaping us into whom we grow to be as individuals. Looking back, it seems crazy to think that so many of us still listen to the same artists and acts that we did as kids. For others, their musical taste changed growing up as often as their mom's boyfriend did—and that equally plays an important part in what they listen to today. At what point does someone settle into a majority of the music that they consume? Do they ever settle? Music is always transforming and transitioning into different forms of what it once ways, so how does one keep up? For some, as the music grows, they grow right along with it. This week we talk about what influenced us musically growing up, and what impact that had on what we listen to today. You're in for another fun one, but only if you tune in to season three, episode five of your mom's seventh boyfriend's favorite music podcast. LET'S GO! Keep up with all of the music we talk about in each episode by listening to the Infectious Groove Podcast Companion Songs playlist, exclusively on Spotify. Infectious Groove Podcast, part of the OddPods Media Network.
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Comments (4)

Christmas Fantasy

I have nothing to avoid https://9apps.ooo/download/. I moved to a new city last August. I literally have nothing and no one. I've been extremely lonely for the past 3 years.

Jun 21st
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Castbox

Love what y'all are doing with this podcast. It's a grab bag of fun and your inter-host banter is top notch!

Mar 19th
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Arielle Nissenblatt

“gangsta rap” hahaha

Mar 16th
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