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Speaker McCarthy, unable to marshal his conference, relied on Democrats to fund the federal government for another 45 days. The deal puts his job in jeopardy and kicks the can down the road as House Republicans will still need to reach party consensus on government spending and aid to Ukraine in order to pass comprehensive government funding bills next month.This episode: White House reporter Deepa Shivaram, political correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.The podcast is produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, is dead at 90. The government is about to shutdown over intra-GOP disagreements. And Biden gave a speech warning about the continuing threats to American Democracy.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Deepa Shivaram, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.The podcast is produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The hearing focused on the business practices of his son's efforts and insinuations that, while serving as vice president, Biden used his office to enrich himself or his family. So far, the Republicans have no substantive evidence to support that claim. This episode: political correspondent Sarah McCammon, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political correspondent Susan Davis.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Seven Republican primary candidates not named Donald Trump debated Wednesday night in the Reagan Library in California. There were some interesting policy questions, plenty of infighting and basically no signs that any of these folks can surge to overtake the former president and win the primary.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
In what is likely a first, the sitting president of the United States joined a picket line. Biden made a brief stop in Michigan wearing a ball cap and quarter-zip to address picketing auto workers through a megaphone. Trump will campaign with auto workers tomorrow.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Senator Bob Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, is facing federal bribery charges. Federal agents found hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and gold at his home.Menendez is remaining defiant and says he will not resign. The senator has faced previous corruption charges — the case ended in a hung jury.We discuss why these types of cases can be so challenging for prosecutors to win.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, and political correspondent Susan Davis.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Congress has left town as House Republicans infighting appears doomed to shutdown the government next week. And both Donald Trump and President Biden appear to have turned their attention toward the general election race — even though the first primary vote has yet to be cast.This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, campaign correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Closed primaries — where only members of that political party can vote — are effectively the final say in the vast majority of House of Representatives elections. Can open primary elections help incentive candidates to work toward consensus?And 300,000 people voted via the web in 2020. And, yes, the tech makes elections experts really worried.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, voting correspondent Ashley Lopez, and voting correspondent Miles Parks.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The former president is evidently trying to shore up support with working class voters in Michigan. He narrowly lost the state in 2020.The autoworkers' union blasted Trump in a statement — though its relationship with the Biden White House is less than cozy.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, national political correspondent Don Gonyea.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The governor of North Dakota is running to be the Republican nominee for president after a long career in business and two elections to the governor's mansion.In an interview with The NPR Politics Podcast, Burgum, who has languished in the polls, says his path to the nomination relies on increasing his name recognition.This episode: politics correspondent Susan Davis and White House correspondent Asma Khalid.The podcast is was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The country's wartime president heads to the United Nations and to Capitol Hill this week to make the case for more support. But the topic of further funding Ukraine's war efforts is increasingly dividing the American public, with Republicans in Congress especially split. This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, national security correspondent Greg Myre, and political correspondent Susan Davis.This episode was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our editor is Eric McDaniel, and our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Congressional redistricting in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and New York may give Democrats a chance to win more seats in the House of Representatives & improve their chances to take back the chamber in the 2024 elections. We explore why.Then, bidding farewell to Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah), and saying hello to Taylor Swift. This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondents Deirdre Walsh and Claudia Grisales, WNYC Albany reporter Jon Campbell, and Gulf States Newsroom reporter Stephan Bisaha.This episode was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The president's son faces three felony charges related to a weapon he purchased in 2018. The charges come after a plea deal fell apart earlier in the summer, and may cause headaches for the Biden campaign — not to mention become fodder for the House's impending impeachment inquiry into the president. This episode: political correspondents Susan Davis & Kelsey Snell, and senior White House correspondent Tamara KeithThis episode was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The Summer Of Labor

The Summer Of Labor

2023-09-1317:574

Public opinion toward organized labor is at recent highs. As a potential strike by the United Auto Workers looms, we look at what UAW workers are looking for in a new contract, and how the Biden administration & Republicans alike are approaching this moment.This episode: political correspondents Susan Davis & Don Gonyea, and labor & workplace correspondent Andrea Hsu.This episode was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The speaker of the House cited "allegations of abuse of power, obstruction, and corruption" in his reasoning to direct House committees to begin the proceedings, which will start at a date to be determined. The White House called it a "political stunt" in a statement, and not all Republican lawmakers are on board with the idea just yet.This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez.This episode was produced by Casey Morell and Elena Moore. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The chair of North Carolina's Democratic party is just 25. Her Republican counterpart in Alabama is 37. Together, they represent a younger generation making inroads in political leadership. How do their perspectives inform their parties' plans in 2024?This episode: political correspondent Susan Davis, and political reporters Ximena Bustillo & Elena Moore.This episode was produced by Casey Morell. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
The former governor of New Jersey is running to be the Republican nominee for president for a second time, having lost to Donald Trump in 2016. In an interview with The NPR Politics Podcast, Christie says both he and the GOP have changed in the intervening years, but his break with Trump and Christie's positions on abortion & Ukraine increasingly put him out of step with the party he hopes to lead. This episode: politics correspondent Susan Davis and senior White House correspondent Tamara Keith.This episode was produced by Casey Morell. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis was once seen as the biggest threat to former President Donald Trump. But his campaign got off to a rocky start and is struggling to gain traction. In this episode, we look at how three non-Trump candidates — DeSantis, Nikki Haley, and Mike Pence — are selling themselves to voters. And whether there is a market for anyone not named Donald in the GOP primary.This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, political correspondent Ashley Lopez, and political correspondent Sarah McCammon.The episode was produced by Lexie Schapitl and Elena Moore. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Ken Paxton, a Republican, is facing a bipartisan impeachment trial in the Texas Senate related to allegations of corruption and bribery, which Paxton denies. Despite being a state official, Paxton has had an outsized influence in national policy, especially regarding immigration, by involving the state of Texas in lawsuits filed against the federal government. This episode: voting correspondents Miles Parks and Ashley Lopez, and Sergio Martinez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom.The podcast is produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Most new recruits to active duty military service were either very young or not yet born when the attacks of September 11th, 2001 took place. As the U.S. nears the 22nd anniversary of the attacks, how is military recruitment changing to adapt to a post-War on Terror landscape — and what impact does it have on military readiness? This episode: voting correspondent Miles Parks, Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, and political correspondent Susan Davis.The podcast is produced by Elena Moore and Casey Morell. Our editor is Eric McDaniel. Our executive producer is Muthoni Muturi. Audio in this podcast was produced by Lexie Schapitl.Unlock access to this and other bonus content by supporting The NPR Politics Podcast+. Sign up via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
Comments (686)

rshackleford53

Holy crap! I didn't think they ever died

Sep 29th
Reply

An interested party

So when you're talking about cutting taxes, are you talking about people in my tax bracket that makes around 100,000 a year? Are you going to cut my property taxes? my state income tax my federal taxes that I pay. what? what are you going to cut? or are you just talking about big profit companies? The trickle down effect is a crock. Money never trickles down. So when you talk about cutting taxes, talk about WHO you're going to cut taxes for, so we know. be more transparent!

Sep 20th
Reply

rshackleford53

isn't this gerrymandering?

Sep 15th
Reply

An interested party

tit for tat! isn't that a great way to run the country?

Sep 13th
Reply

oliya shariati

hi I can't download this episode!!!!

Sep 13th
Reply

Two Eyes

The New York "imagination" problem is completely on the responsibility of Joe Biden. The problem begins and ends at the border. In an act of colossal synonym, Joe Biden undid the policy's that Donald Trump had in place that had the problem under control and somewhat manageable. Since Biden took office, illegal immigration and all the human suffering it brought on has multiplied exponentially, for Americans and for migrants. especially by the migrant women and children at the hands of the coyotes and other criminals who brutally take advantage of them. Of course Biden smugly tries to blame everyone else but it always blows up in his face because it's so obviously on him.

Aug 28th
Reply (3)

rshackleford53

30 billion to Ukraine on the same week.

Aug 22nd
Reply (1)

Aakash Amanat

I've been an avid listener of The NPR Politics Podcast for quite a while now, and I just had to drop in and share my thoughts. This podcast has truly become a staple in keeping me informed about the political landscape, both domestically and internationally. https://www.hotfrog.com/company/2dfe11a584f9659cbb449d08578c00d9/prime-butcher-wrap/chicago/design-printing The hosts' ability to break down complex issues into easily digestible segments is something I greatly appreciate. It's not always easy to follow everything happening in the world of politics, but they manage to present it in a way that feels engaging and enlightening. https://www.startus.cc/company/prime-butcher-wrap

Aug 19th
Reply

Amanda Swangin

Is this guy sure he's a Republican? if they hadn't said he was gop candidate, I'd have thought he was a really moderate Democrat. This is mind-boggling.

Aug 13th
Reply

An interested party

Trump's also not going to miss a chance to spend taxpayers money on a jet and security to move around. he wants to look like the poor beautiful prosecuted ex president boohoo

Aug 4th
Reply

An interested party

those poor people. those poor poor people that have the horse blinders on are throwing good money after bad....

Aug 3rd
Reply

Adam Balogh

republicans are tapeworms

Jul 16th
Reply

Pætrïck Lėő Dåvīd

greetings from 55n 124w and we see a bear a day here. it is sad because they are attracted to human garbage. it is very very sad.

Jul 16th
Reply

It's JustB

What am I missing here? I'm definitely not in support of wealthy people in power (regardless of political affiliations) being able to get away with tax evasion. But how are these people not ashamed that they are pushing so hard for Hunter Biden to be indicted while ignoring their leader who's accused of doing the same, more than once? 🤔

Jul 7th
Reply

rshackleford53

Yet governments plan to invest $40 billion to build Ukraine a "green" steel industry. The elites don't give a shit about American working-class.

Jun 20th
Reply

Jimbo Jett

Wait, what? Biden is an historically unpopular president? Really? We're you all just born last week? please define your standards & provide stats. It would be equally legitimate to claim the opposite - that he is historically popular. Which he is not. Biden is right in the same ballpark as most presidents. Except the last one, of course, who truly epitomized "historically unpopular".

Jun 5th
Reply

ToliG

Not bad, I like him more than any other Rep at the moment.

May 23rd
Reply

Scott Stock

I think he needs to research the founders' opinions on religion and Republican attitudes toward identity.

May 22nd
Reply

Vorec6:17

Who thinks the Democrats think default is such a bad thing. The debt ceiling could be raised today, if president Biden would just go along with the house Republicans spending cuts. no way on earth we need to spend the preposterous amount of money that has been approved over the last 2 or 3 years.

May 10th
Reply (1)

Vorec6:17

here's an idea, why doesn't the government create a budget that doesn't need to have the debt ceiling raised in the first place.

May 10th
Reply
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