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Until It's Fixed

Author: Optum

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Health care in the United States is complex, hard to navigate and doesn’t always work the way it should. The good news: So much has changed over the last few years. Leaders inside and outside of the health industry are rethinking how to deliver care and support to meet all people where they’re at.

When it comes to your health, everything is connected. So, taking better care of it needs to go beyond the physical to include mental, emotional, social and spiritual health. And to look at the full picture, health care needs to give more consideration to where you are born, live, learn and work, too.

In Season 3 of “Until It’s Fixed,” we’ll talk with thought leaders and advocates working to solve the health industry’s biggest challenges — as well as personal stories from people who live with these issues every day.

We’ll have deep conversations about opportunities to make the current system work better for everyone, including talking more openly about the role that gender, sexual orientation, race, income and other areas of your life play in accessing and receiving health care.

This is where change starts. Join us on the inspiring journey to create a healthier world — and make health care simpler and more effective for everyone.
55 Episodes
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EPISODE SUMMARY: We’re at the end of Season 3, and we’ve covered a lot of new ground on what’s being done to make health care work better for everyone. Hosts Callie Chamberlain and Dr. Kenny Poole share their favorite moments and reflect on the biggest takeaways from conversations with over 30 guests this year. HIGHLIGHTS:[03:52] Callie and Dr. Poole discuss their biggest takeaways from the season[07:30] The hosts recap great pieces of advice from our guests as well as share their own perspective  and words they live by  RESOURCES:Until It’s Fixed: A Health Care Podcast – Season 3 | OptumThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:Fertility is something you may not think about until you’re ready to have children. But, like all areas of your health, issues that impact your fertility may start years before that time arrives. Dr. Lisa Saul from UnitedHealthcare joins us to explain why thinking about your reproductive health now can make a difference later as well as what steps you can take today.HIGHLIGHT:[1:15] Dr. Lisa Saul shares what’s being done to improve education around fertility and health support.RESOURCES:How to protect and maximize your fertility (optum.com)GUEST:Dr. Lisa Saul, MD, MBA, National Medical Director – Maternal Health, UnitedHealthcareFor more on fertility, check out the full episode with guests Gabriela Marmolejos from Advisory Board and Nikki Battiste, CBS National News correspondent.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
Figuring Out Fertility

Figuring Out Fertility

2023-06-2720:012

EPISODE SUMMARY:When it comes to your health, fertility isn’t always something that’s discussed. If you’re trying to get pregnant now, or may consider having children in the future, it’s helpful to understand your reproductive health. Or, someone in your life may be thinking about their fertility and looking for support. Join us as we talk with Gabriela Marmolejos, a senior research analyst at Advisory Board who specializes in maternal health, and Nikki Battiste, a CBS News correspondent, who shares her personal fertility story. HIGHLIGHTS:[03:00] Gabriela Marmolejos discusses what can affect fertility. [06:35] Nikki Battiste talks about how to support someone who is struggling on their fertility journey. RESOURCES:How to protect and maximize your fertility (optum.com)GUESTS:Gabriela Marmolejos, Senior Research Analyst, Advisory BoardNikki Battiste, CBS National News CorrespondentThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:When it comes to any relationship, it takes two people to make it work. And, a doctor-patient relationship is no different – both people have a role to play in communicating, which helps build trust. This week, we look at how you can create or improve a relationship with your doctor by talking with guests from both sides: Dr. Maria Hale, a patient experience expert at Optum, and Omase Lassey, a patient and health advocate. RESOURCES:What makes a good doctor? 7 signs you have a great one | OptumGUESTS:Dr. Maria Hale, Chief Patient Experience Officer, Optum Tri-StateOmase Lassey, patient and health advocate For more on finding the right doctor for you, check out the full episode with guest Dr. Soo Rhee from Healthgrades.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.  
EPISODE SUMMARY: Many studies show having a strong relationship with your doctor really matters. People who like their doctor report fewer health issues and a higher quality of life compared to those who don’t. That’s because the more comfortable you are with your doctor, the more likely you may be to follow their advice – or go to them when you’re struggling. We talk with Dr. Soo Rhee from Healthgrades (part of RVO Health,) the #1 platform for finding a doctor and a leader in health care transparency, about how to not just find a doctor but the right doctor for you.HIGHLIGHT:[04:48] Dr. Soo Rhee talks about how Healthgrades helps patients to make empowered and informed decisions.RESOURCES:HealthgradesWhat makes a good doctor? 7 signs you have a great one | OptumHow different mental health professionals help you heal I OptumGUESTS:Dr. Soo Rhee, VP Medical Science, Quality Solutions, HealthgradesThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY: A side of your health and well-being that may be top-of-mind is health costs and how to save for or manage them. Health insurance can play a part, but there are other financial tools that could be available to you. Author, podcast host and financial influencer Michela Allocca from “Break Your Budget” joins the conversation to break down a common, yet often underutilized, benefit for managing health costs—medical expense accounts. While you may be familiar with HSAs and FSAs, a recent survey* found roughly one-third of Americans who were eligible for an HSA did not have one. And, of those who did, roughly half had not contributed in the last year. We’ll talk about how these accounts can help you—and your loved ones—save money on health care costs.*Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)GUEST:Michela Allocca, founder of online personal finance platform “Break Your Budget,” author, entrepreneur, and financial analyst RESOURCES:Medical Expense Eligibility ToolHealth savings accounts (HSAs) (optumbank.com)What are medical expense accounts? | Optum11 Surprising Things You Can Buy With HSA or FSA Dollars | OptumHome (breakyourbudget.com)The views, opinions, endorsements, and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:Habit tracking, like writing down what you’re eating/drinking, can help keep you honest when working towards a health goal. When it comes to getting more movement into your day, using a wearable fitness tracker or your phone can help. Some experts recommend aiming for 10,000 steps a day to get maximum health benefits but others say just getting up and getting moving is really the most important thing – no matter the number. National board-certified health and wellness coach Corin Groustra joins us to talk about ways to sneak more activity into your day.GUEST:Corin Groustra, national board-certified health and wellness coach RESOURCES:How to get physical activity into your day (optum.com)Walking for weight loss (optum.com)Step Up for Summer - Explore routes in a city near you. (uhcstepup.com)For more on how wellness and reward programs are supporting healthy habits, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:What motivates you to stay healthy? It’s different for everyone, but some people find participating in health and wellness rewards programs through their employer or health insurance company really pays off. If you adopt simple habits like tracking your steps or getting an annual physical, you may have opportunities to earn dollars, which you can use in a variety of ways. Samantha Baker from UnitedHealthcare joins us to talk about how health and wellness rewards programs are changing to better fit your life and Jodi Baldel, a participant, talks about how getting involved in a wellness program helped her reach personal goals.HIGHLIGHTS:[03:46] Samantha Baker discusses the unique ways wellness program participants can earn rewards. [16:32] Jodi Baldel talks about how participating in a wellness program helped her get ahead of her health and fitness goals. RESOURCES:UnitedHealthcare Introduces New Rewards Program With a Modern Approach to Well-Being - UnitedHealth GroupUHC RewardsWellness and rewards programs for members | UnitedHealthcare (uhc.com)Workplace Wellness and Fitness - OptumGUESTS: Samantha Baker, Chief Consumer Officer for UnitedHealthcare’s commercial business Jodi Baldel, health and wellness rewards program participantThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:Having health care that meets you where you’re at is always important. But when you’re not feeling well or have a medical emergency, knowing where to get care can be critical for your health – and also helpful for your wallet. During a crisis, you’re more likely to pick the first place you see – which may not be the best option. We’ll break down primary care, nurse lines, telehealth, urgent care and emergency rooms so you can find the right fit for health situations ranging from small to serious.RESOURCES:UHC: Where to go for medical careUHC: Quick comparison chartFor more on the experience of finding health care when it comes to retail health clinics and rural communities, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
From Checkouts To Cows

From Checkouts To Cows

2023-04-2729:011

EPISODE SUMMARY: Over the last few years, retail health clinics have grown by over 20%* – opening in stores you visit for everything from groceries to home goods. Dr. David Carmouche from Walmart Health joins us to discuss the growth of retail health as well as how it fits into people’s daily lives. And, as the health industry expands to better meet you where you’re at, we talk with Beth O’Connor, host of The Rural Health Voice podcast and past president of the National Rural Health Association, about the unique challenges rural Americans face getting the care they need.*Forrester researchHIGHLIGHTS:[04:14] David Carmouche discusses the latest trends in retail health and how it’s meeting people where they’re at.[15:35] Beth O’Connor talks about unique ways to solve rural health challenges. RESOURCES:Home - NRHA (ruralhealth.us)Rural Healthcare (walmart.com)Walmart and UnitedHealth Group Collaborate To Deliver Access to High-Quality, Affordable Health CareGUESTS: Dr. David Carmouche, Senior Vice President of Omnichannel Care Offerings at WalmartBeth O’Connor, Executive Director of the Virginia Rural Health Association (2022 National Rural Health Association president) and host of The Rural Health Voice podcastThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world. 
EPISODE SUMMARY:More than two-thirds of Americans face at least one social challenge that affects their health — like transportation, housing or food concerns.* If you are struggling to get enough food for an active, healthy life, you’re not alone: 1 in 8 people in the U.S. experience food insecurity.**If health care workers observe or learn about food insecurity during an in-home visit, they’ll refer people to community organizations for support. These are usually local nonprofits who rely on donations of time, items and dollars to keep their doors open. We’ll talk about how to find a food bank, pantry or shelf in your area for yourself or a loved one – and one way to give back if you can. *Social Needs in America survey**Feeding America & USDA, 2021RESOURCES:Looking for support? You’re not alone. There are many programs and services that help people find food in their communities- here are three to start:United Healthcare: Your Connection to Community ResourcesFood, medical care, housing, transportation and more- search by zip codeFeeding America: Find your local food bankApply for national food programs like SNAP and WIC and connect with your local food bankUnited Way 211: Finding FoodCall 211 if you need help getting food immediately or connect with local programs including meal delivery For more on home- and community-based care, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:From clothes and groceries to movies and family dinners, it’s often expected to have both convenience and choice when getting services or products for yourself or a loved one. So, what about caring for your health? Kristy Duffey from Optum Home & Community Care and Kim DeMasie, a nurse practitioner and nonprofit founder, join our latest episode to talk about the demand for health care outside of a doctor’s office or hospital and the growing options for getting the right care at the right time from the comfort of your home. HIGHLIGHTS:[5:50] Kim DeMasie talks about how her work as a HouseCalls nurse and passion for volunteering come together in her community food pantry.[16:42] Kristy Duffey talks about how home and community care are helping people get the care they want, where they want it.  RESOURCES:Housecalls: In-Home Clinical Assessment Program | OptumHouseCalls InfographicNewsroom - Indiana Nurse Practitioner Goes the Extra Mile Providing Home Visits (uhc.com) GUESTS: Kim DeMasie, Clinical Team Manager and Nurse Practitioner at Optum, nonprofit organizer and volunteerKristy Duffey, Chief Nursing Officer at Optum Health and Chief Operating Officer at Optum Home & Community CareThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world. 
EPISODE SUMMARY:Think about your workday- what your environment looks like, how you interact with co-workers, how you prefer to communicate. If you identify as neurodivergent, that means your brain works differently. Things such as background noise, bright lights, crowded spaces or pings from colleagues may lead to feeling overwhelmed, uncomfortable or anxious. We’ll talk with Amy Root, UnitedHealth Group Director of Neurodiversity Inclusion, about the one thing you can do today to create a neuro-inclusive work environment.GUEST:Amy Root, Director of Neurodiversity Inclusion at UnitedHealth GroupRESOURCE:Advancing DE&I - UnitedHealth Group (uhg.com)For more on what neurodiversity is and how we can better recognize and value thinking differently, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
Thinking Differently

Thinking Differently

2023-03-2136:599

EPISODE SUMMARY: There is no 'normal' when it comes to the human brain. We all experience the world uniquely and learn, think and communicate in different ways. However, there’s a generally accepted range of what’s considered ‘typical,’ and brain activity outside of that range is considered ‘neurodivergent.’ This includes people with conditions like ADHD, autism, dyslexia, OCD, and Tourette's.It’s estimated that up to 20% of the U.S. population identifies as neurodivergent.* While this may bring challenges in social, work or school settings, differences can be real strengths. We talk with KC Davis, licensed professional counselor, author of the book How To Keep House While Drowning and host of the podcast Struggle Care as well as Amy Root, Director of Neurodiversity Inclusion at UnitedHealth Group, about their personal journeys as well as what needs to be done to better support thinking differently. HIGHLIGHTS:[08:16] Amy Root and KC Davis discuss why there’s increased conversations about neurodivergence, including recent research, advocacy and activism.[14:53] Amy and KC talk about how women and girls are often overlooked when diagnosing neurodivergent conditions and share their personal journeys to diagnoses.RESOURCES:How to Keep House While DrowningHow to do laundry when you're depressed | TED TalkWhat is Struggle Care? — KC DavisNeurodiversity in Cybersecurity – Amy Root - NeuroSec (captivate.fm)GUESTS: Amy Root, Director of Neurodiversity Inclusion at UnitedHealth GroupKC Davis, licensed professional counselor, author of How to Keep House While Drowning and creator of mental health platform and podcast Struggle Care.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world. 
EPISODE SUMMARY:Research shows that women spend 32 hours per week on childcare and housework compared to just 18 hours for men.* Special guest Eve Rodsky, bestselling author of Fair Play, attorney, and activist, translates this stat to real life by talking trash — literally. She illustrates how a simple task like taking out the garbage led to conflict with her husband, and offers one thing you can do today to have an honest and productive conversation about household chores.*Pew Research CenterGUEST:Eve Rodsky, bestselling author, Fair Play, attorney and activistRESOURCES:The text from Eve Rodsky's husband that made her say "I'm done" with their division of labor | Salon.comFor more on how primary caregivers and women are affected by the division of labor at home and in the workplace, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world. 
Seeing Invisible Labor

Seeing Invisible Labor

2023-03-0737:033

EPISODE SUMMARY:How we divide chores and childcare is an age-old problem, with women historically handling most of the work in the home. Laundry, cleaning and carpool may seem like personal issues, but they can cause burnout, anxiety, depression and other illnesses like any job outside the home. This makes “invisible labor” a matter of public health. If you work at home, you may feel what you do isn’t acknowledged or seen as valuable. If you work outside of the home, you may feel you’re also working a “second shift” with your family responsibilities. Eve Rodsky, New York Times bestselling author of the book Fair Play, which inspired a documentary by Hello Sunshine, shares her personal story and offers actionable tips to find better balance.HIGHLIGHTS:[04:30] Interview: Eve Rodsky, author of Fair Play, attorney, and activist | Rodsky defines the terms “invisible labor” and “mental load” and examines how caregiving and chores are viewed in our society.[13:16] Rodsky discusses how the unfair division of labor affects the health of women and primary caregivers – as well as what we can do to fix it.RESOURCES:Fair Play documentaryThe Fair Play methodGUEST: Eve Rodsky, bestselling author of Fair Play, attorney and activistThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:One big thing that affects your health is diet – and when it comes to eating better, fruits and vegetables are key. But did you know only about 9% of Americans are getting enough greens (and yellows, reds and oranges?)* Special guest Dr. Edwin McDonald shares one thing you can do today to improve your eating habits at home.* Centers for Disease Control & PreventionGUEST:Dr. Edwin McDonald, Assistant Professor UChicago Medicine, Gastroenterologist, Project Brotherhood Leader, and Culinary Arts/Nutrition Advocate RESOURCES:The Doc's Kitchen - A Blog of Healthy Recipes from a Doctor and Chef (thedocskitchen.com)For more on how health disparities impact the Black community and how local organizations are working towards better Black health outcomes, check out the full episode.The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:There are major health disparities facing the Black community: Black people are at higher risk for heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and more. They also live about six years less on average compared to other racial and ethnic groups. * During Black History Month, our hosts talk with Norman Wright from UnitedHealth Group and Edward Walton from Black Men Run about how we got here, what needs to be done to improve health care for Black Americans and how community organizations are leading the way.* Kaiser Family FoundationHIGHLIGHTS:[04:28] Interview: Norman Wright, Executive Vice President, Health Equity Strategy for UnitedHealth Group | Wright discusses healthcare access in underserved communities by examining barriers and the history of racism in the United States. [25:57] Interview: Edward Walton, Co-Founder, Black Men Run | Walton shares the origin story of Black Men Run, emphasizing its status as more than just a running club, but as an accessible space for Black men to take control of their health and well-being.RESOURCES:The United Health Foundation Commits $100 Million to Further Advance a Diverse Health Workforce - UnitedHealth GroupBuilding a Diverse, Culturally Competent Health Workforce - UnitedHealth GroupBlack Men Run GUESTS: Norman Wright, Executive Vice President, Health Equity Strategy, UHGEdward Walton, Co-Founder, Black Men RunThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
EPISODE SUMMARY:Spirituality and religion aren’t things we typically think about when it comes to health and health care—and they can be intimidating to talk about with your doctor. This week, Callie and Dr. Poole share how to think about, write down and share how spirituality and/or religion affect your care preferences so you feel prepared to talk about them—both now and in the future.For more on how your spiritual and/or religious practices relate to your health and health care, check out the full episode. The views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
Body, Mind...And Spirit

Body, Mind...And Spirit

2023-02-0742:511

EPISODE SUMMARY:Spirituality and religion play an important role in many people’s lives—but they may not feel comfortable bringing up these topics with their care providers. As we continue to look at ways to better support your health and well-being, Dr. Mary Jo Kreitzer and Reverend Brian Hughes join our hosts for a discussion about how spirituality and religion affect health care—and how to get the conversation started.HIGHLIGHTS:04:10 Interview: Dr. Mary Jo Kreitzer, Director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Spirituality & Healing | Dr. Kreitzer has spent much of her career as a physician, educator, and researcher studying the connection between our spiritual practice and our health. She talks about the importance of asking the question “what matters?” when it comes to health and health care, instead of the traditional question, “what’s the matter?”024:35 Interview: Rev. Brian Hughes, spiritual care specialist and chaplain at UnitedHealth Group | Rev. Hughes shares anecdotes from his personal experiences as a hospital chaplain, including what it’s like to put aside his own perspective and focus on being present for another person in need. RESOURCES:How to talk to someone who is seriously ill or dying (optum.com)How to live well with chronic illness (optum.com)Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & HealingGUESTS:Dr. Mary Jo Kreitzer, Founder & Director, Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & HealingBrian Hughes, Chaplain & Spiritual Care Specialist at UnitedHealth GroupThe views, opinions, endorsements and content expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of Optum.Visit optum.com for more information about how Optum is helping to create a healthier world.
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Comments (5)

Russ

Health insurance is straight trash in the us. All should be not for profit entities, this would stop the conflict of interest between shareholders and clients. They got in the business of paying medical bills and the only thing they spend money on is lobbying so they can pay the least amount possible. Keep your podcast.

Jun 12th
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gitano percy

His video is not coming here or we can watch his episode with good video on pinterest video downloader.https://pintdow.com/

Apr 6th
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Andrea

Get a different job if you can’t handle your work environment. No employer wants whiny little employees.

Apr 2nd
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Scott Sanders

Great show

Mar 30th
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Happy⚛️Heretic

Great information we all need.

Oct 21st
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