DiscoverThe NPR Politics Podcast
The NPR Politics Podcast
Claim Ownership

The NPR Politics Podcast

Author: NPR

Subscribed: 337,527Played: 6,755,976
Share

Description

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
845 Episodes
Reverse
There was bipartisan backlash after Trump suggested that he would have to see the results before committing to a peaceful presidential transition. And Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the first woman in U.S. history to lie in state at the Capitol.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In an ongoing series congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell looks under the hood at campaigns. From how they raise money to what they do once they have it.This episode, Kelsey looks at political fundraising. She talks to former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci about how you ask for those big checks from millionaires, and the head of digital fundraising for Bernie Sanders about how you get a lot of people to donate just a little bit of money over and over again.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and congressional correspondent Kelsey SnellConnect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
It is hard to conceptualized 200,000 lives lost. Hundreds more die each day. And a vaccine, with partial efficacy and patchwork adoption, won't be enough to end the pandemic. That would take more testing, contract tracing, and social distancing. Also, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was honored in services at the high court.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, science correspondent Allison Aubrey, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
As Republicans secure the votes to move forward on a Supreme Court nomination, government funding negotiations hit a snag. And Americans are struggling after months with no new federal coronavirus support.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
"Most of them [the potential nominees] are young, and they've gone through the [nomination] process very recently," Trump said. He noted that one person he is considering for the vacancy is 38 years old and could be on the court for 50 years. Stay Up To Date: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Live BlogThis episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday. The Supreme Court announced her death, saying the cause was complications from metastatic cancer of the pancreas. OUR COVERAGE: - Obituary, by Nina Totenberg - Live Blog and Latest News - Trump's Supreme Court Short-list - What Happened With Merrick Garland And Why It Matters Now (from 2018)This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, legal correspondent Nina Totenburg, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A steady presidential race remains steady: Joe Biden's lead is in the high single-digits nationally. But Trump's messaging tying Joe Biden to socialism is finding purchase with Latino voters in Florida, a state that is essential to the president's re-election effort.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign reporter Juana Summers, White House reporter Franco Ordoñez, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told Congress that a widely-available vaccine probably won't be available until well into 2021. But he did say that masks are perhaps even more useful in preventing the spread. That will prove especially true if people are reluctant to take the vaccine.This episode: White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and science correspondent Joe Palca.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Joe Biden maintains a lead in key states Trump won in 2016, but the race remains tight in Florida. Arizona and Georgia are toss-ups, and Texas is pink. And, the race is remarkably stable. Our reporting from across the country finds that a vanishingly small share of voters are persuadable. That makes the election primarily a turnout contest.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Understanding the motivation of voters in Michigan and Pennsylvania is key to understand the 2016 coalition that allowed President Trump to notch a decisive electoral college victory. Is Joe Biden doing enough to draw that support back to the Democratic column?This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, national political correspondent Don Gonyea, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and political reporter Abigail Censkey of WKAR in Michigan.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
After the weekend's rally, aimed at building support among Hispanic voters, President Trump spent Monday in California hearing about disaster response there. Kamala Harris is set to visit her home state tomorrow.And Democrats have made the decision to abandon door-knocking to engage with voters. The Trump campaign alleges it's knocking on a million doors a week. So who has the best strategy?This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
As wildfires rage across the west, activists are noting the campaign's relative silence on the issue of climate change. Natural disasters of all sorts, from heat waves to hurricanes, are made worse as humans continue to increase their emissions.And the Treasury Department and Microsoft have disclosed new election interference efforts by foreign powers, including Russia. The disclosures come the same week a whistleblower alleged Trump administration officials pushed intelligence staff to downplay findings that could make the president look bad. The administration denies the claims.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, science correspondent Lauren Sommer, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Department of Homeland Security official says in his complaint that he was ordered to halt reports that made the president "look bad." DHS and the White House deny the allegation. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, election security editor Phil Ewing, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Trump was aware of the severity of the coronavirus in early February, telling Bob Woodward that it was much more severe than the flu. In public, Trump used the flu comparison in a different way: highlighting the flu's high seasonal death toll compared to the few dozen early cases of coronavirus.He admitted to Woodward in March that he was intentionally downplaying the pandemic in order to avoid panic.Those revelations are contained in Woodward's new book Rage.The United States death toll from the disease will likely top 200,000 by the end of the month.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Pressed on whether he was politicizing vaccine development by suggesting that a vaccine could come before election day (very unlikely), President Trump insisted his pitch was that a vaccine would be available by the end of the year, and that he was just saying it may be possible by late October or early November. And, his campaign is struggling with money.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In this Labor Day episode of the podcast, we hear from voters in Wisconsin, Iowa, and Pennsylvania about how they're feeling about their options in November.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson, Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Isolated bursts of violence between protesters have left at least three Americans dead. But demonstrations across the country remain primarily peaceful. And reporting in The Atlantic alleges that President Trump called military service members "losers" and repeatedly privately degraded troops.Also: Facebook now acknowledges that it has a role to play in election security, but experts say that the moves it announced this week are insufficient given the scale of the problems — especially when it comes to disinformation originating from President Trump.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, technology correspondent Shannon Bond, and voting reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Six million Americans have been diagnosed with coronavirus and more than 185 thousand have died. Cases nationally are trending downward, but the Midwest is seeing a youth-driven surge. And while the number of people seeking unemployment money has continued to tick downward, the absolute numbers of folks out of work remain high when compared to January.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, science correspondent Allison Aubrey, and economics correspondent Scott Horsley.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Republicans' internal divisions, and divisions with President Trump, made legislating nearly impossible during Trump's first term. There's little sign that thing would be different should he be re-elected.And Sen. Ed Markey, Democrat of Massachusetts, won his primary against Rep. Joe Kennedy III. Congressman Richard Neal, chairman of the House Ways and Means committee, also held-off a insurgent challenger. But the contests illustrate a new reality of Democratic politics: primary challenges are here to stay.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional reporter Kelsey Snell, and congressional editor Deirdre Walsh.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The president is in Kenosha, Wis., today, a city that has been rocked by protests after police shot a black man several times in the back a little over a week ago. Despite some incidents of looting, crime appears to be on par with recent years and near a three-decade low. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
loading
Comments (469)

alli lent

sounds like Andrew Yang's "democracy dollars" ideas could really make this a more fair and inclusive process.

Sep 25th
Reply

Sam

Rest In Power, RBG. Your legacy will live on forever. A true American hero. We will carry on this fight.

Sep 19th
Reply

alli lent

woohoo shout-out to Erie, PA! hopefully we swing the right way this year 🤞

Sep 16th
Reply

AJ Johnson

so...we haven't confirmed them, but we are certainly going to report them...

Sep 4th
Reply

Oliverr Whiite

NPR sucks. Stop covering Trump like he's a normal president, stop broadcasting his lies without fact checking them.

Aug 29th
Reply

Janet Hernandez

"If we had Civic Education"... why don't we?!

Aug 28th
Reply

alli lent

can anyone explain the "abolish the suburbs" thing they keep saying? it really makes no sense to me at all..

Aug 28th
Reply

Jimmy Jurassic

Spooked alert:. Trump's speech tonight will be a rehash of Nixon's '68 acceptance speech.

Aug 27th
Reply

Joseph Crawford

Trumps gonna win in a landslide

Aug 26th
Reply (2)

alli lent

how can these people talk about what's happening in Portland as something that Biden's fault? this is LITERALLY Trump's America. if people want that to stop, why would we keep the same person in charge?

Aug 25th
Reply

Eoj Hou

Why are you giving Dejoy the benefit of the doubt when Trump has repeatedly said he's against mail-in ballots for everyone other than himself. They lie about everything. Red flags and warning bells are alerting us to danger, but y'all sound like you want to ignore them, get screwed on election day, and then pretend like you're surprised. The White House lies about everything.

Aug 22nd
Reply

alli lent

so it's not safe enough to vote but let's get all the kids back together at school everyday? c'mon man

Jul 31st
Reply

alli lent

awe they didn't mention Stacey Abrams :(

Jul 29th
Reply

Lowell Hennigs

ok npr. that's it. If you can't call trumps suburb rhetoric at least historically racist, then you are not reporting the news accurately. unsubscribing .

Jul 22nd
Reply (3)

Trichia Marie Magro

plays just fine for me.

Jul 18th
Reply

Daniel Wood

it must be Castbox because I was able to play it on iHeartRadio. I hate switching podcast apps, but I guess it's time yet again

Jul 18th
Reply

Carol Youngquist

:-( why won't it download?

Jul 17th
Reply

Dominick Favata

Broken link!

Jul 17th
Reply

Jeanie Mummert Kent

sad to have missed a 2nd episode this week because the link in broken. as a regular listener this is frustrating and disappointing

Jul 17th
Reply

Nathan Viking Henkenius

Seems to be an issue playing this episode. 2nd one this has happened to this week :( The show must go on!

Jul 17th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store