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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

964 Episodes
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For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.As state stay-at-home orders expired, small business owners faced a daunting question: Should they risk the survival of their company, or their health? Today, we speak again with one restaurant owner about the decision she made.Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were aired.One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States was inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we revisit our conversation with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew — and ask her how she has been doing since. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, and Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who works for Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Refugees from around the world worked at the Smithfield pork factory. Then they faced mounting illness and the sudden loss of their jobs.
For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.Italy was an early epicenter of the pandemic in Europe. In March, we spoke to a doctor who was triaging patients north of Milan about the road that might lie ahead for the United States. Today, we call him again to hear what it was like to discharge his last coronavirus patient while the American caseload soars. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan and the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to institute a nationwide lockdown and, later, to choose a cautious approach to reopening public spaces. Here is a comparison of how successful other countries have been in their subsequent responses to the pandemic.
After protests convulsed Hong Kong for much of the last year, the city’s pro-democracy movement has been chilled by a new law that some say may change the semiautomonous territory forever. Today, we examine why China chose this moment to assert control, and what the new law means for the city’s future. Guest: Austin Ramzy, a reporter in Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The new legislation grants Beijing broad powers to crack down on a variety of political crimes in Hong Kong and schools are being overhauled to teach loyalty to China.Here’s how the city’s residents are navigating its new reality.
As the coronavirus pandemic swept the world, The New York Times Magazine asked 29 authors to write new short stories inspired by the moment — and by Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” which was written as a plague ravaged Florence in the 14th century. We’ve selected two for you to hear today.These stories were written by Tommy Orange and Edwidge Danticat. They were recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard — and the meaning of their decisions.Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The Court cleared the way for prosecutors in New York to seek President Trump’s financial records — but stopped Congress from accessing the records by subpoena for now.Our chief White House correspondent writes that the Supreme Court affirmed the power of judicial independence by dismissing President Trump’s claims of immunity.
At the end of January, long before the world understood that seemingly healthy people could spread the coronavirus, a doctor in Germany tried to sound the alarm. Today, we look at why that warning was unwelcome.Guests: Matt Apuzzo, an investigative reporter for The New York Times based in Brussels.Dr. Camilla Rothe, an infectious disease specialist at Munich University Hospital.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: At the end of March, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that as many as 25 percent of those infected by the coronavirus may not show symptoms.Some scientists have criticized the World Health Organization over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic, saying its statements and advice sometimes lag behind research.
Counting the Infected

Counting the Infected

2020-07-0831:4367

For months, the U.S. government has been quietly collecting information on hundreds of thousands of coronavirus cases across the country. Today, we tell the story of how The Times got hold of that data, and what it says about the nation’s outbreak.Plus: a conversation with three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station.Guests: Robert Gebeloff, a reporter for The New York Times specializing in data analysis.Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The C.D.C. figures provide the fullest and most extensive look yet at the racial inequity of the coronavirus.A Times analysis published in late May found that Democrats were far more likely to live in counties that had been ravaged by the virus, while Republicans were more likely to live in counties that had been relatively unscathed.A team of New York Times journalists is also working to track every coronavirus case in the United States, and The Times has made its data open to the public.
What President Trump’s divisive speech at Mount Rushmore reveals about his re-election campaign.Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Missteps by a fractured campaign and a series of self-inflicted wounds added up to a very bad June for President Trump.In speeches at the White House and Mount Rushmore last weekend, the president promoted a version of the “American carnage” vision from his inaugural address.
Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.
What Went Wrong in Brazil

What Went Wrong in Brazil

2020-07-0229:1643

Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chiefFor more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Here’s an overview of what you need to know about the coronavirus in Brazil.The country’s pioneering responses to past health crises, including AIDS and Zika, won global praise.
A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan — and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: The Times reported on Monday that President Trump was provided a written briefing on the intelligence about the suspected Russian plot in late February.“If it does come out as true, obviously the heartache would be terrible,” said the father of a Marine who died in a 2019 car bombing in Afghanistan, which is reportedly the focus of investigators’ work.
The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why — for the third time in two weeks — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Chief Justice Roberts also voted with the court’s liberal wing in rulings on job discrimination against L.G.B.T.Q. workers and on a program protecting young immigrants.The ruling on Monday stalled anti-abortion momentum for now, but the movement has a long pipeline of new cases.Justice Stephen G. Breyer wrote that the Louisiana law was “almost word-for-word identical” to a law from Texas, which the court struck down in 2016.
In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement — and what the role of the police should be.In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country’s largest police unions.Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Protesters across the country are calling for the abolition of police forces. But what would that actually look like?Last week, the House passed a sweeping police overhaul bill, aimed at combating racial bias and excessive use of force, by a vote of 236 to 181. The bill is not expected to pass the Republican-controlled Senate.
In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank — one of the most influential photographers in history — who, through his camera, collected the world.This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It’s about expressing the meaning of a song — and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.
A Dilemma in Texas

A Dilemma in Texas

2020-06-2629:3156

Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state’s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state’s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A growing number of state leaders are pausing plans to reopen as case counts rise. Among them is Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas, who did so reluctantly after facing mounting pressure in the Republican-controlled state.We analyzed travel patterns, hidden infections and genetic data to show how the epidemic has spun out of control in the United States.
This fall’s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: A New York Times/Siena College poll found that Joseph R. Biden Jr. is ahead of the president by 14 points, leading among women and nonwhite voters and cutting into his support with white voters.
Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can’t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Some people have started to return to work, but the recovery is uneven. More than a million new jobless claims continue to be filed each week, and certain industries are far outpacing others in the rebound from the mass job losses in April.The unemployment rate isn’t the whole story when it comes to understanding the economic impact of the pandemic.
This episode contains strong language. Today’s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily Background reading: Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.
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Comments (4024)

True

5:00

Jul 16th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

that's fantastic. she should ABSOLUTELY write. and speak and be compensated for it. the woman's story is iconic.

Jul 15th
Reply

Julia Evans

Why does the host speak as if he is narrating a crappy YouTube video? It's super irritating.

Jul 15th
Reply

tom_adv

not enjoying this show anymore, i feel like they're trying to deceive me. don't mind listening to leftwing views but not when they claim to be in the center.

Jul 15th
Reply

Kirsty MacColl

The reason why I think the words honor should be removed from wedding vows

Jul 14th
Reply

Syed

China is Joffrey Baratheon in disguise!

Jul 14th
Reply

Sasha Anne Lyn

and once again, the central Chinese government steals the soul and joy of the people by the insistence on absolute obedience and shroud of all pervading fear. Have a nice life, if you can- if you dare.

Jul 13th
Reply

Peter Worden

s,,

Jul 13th
Reply

Les Knope

Was expecting the comforting kind of read, definitely did not get that. But beautifully written.

Jul 12th
Reply

Rebecca Pelton

I think it's easy to write off this conversation as a racist cop protecting a racist system... in part you could say that's true. But what's ALSO true is that citizens are expecting cops to heroically overrule the racist, sexist, society that we live within and that they are trained within. Blaming police feels unfair to me because we ALL live within this system and the problem is not police but society itself! I think we all have a responsibility to address our own racism, and to vote for people who require this to be done. Vilifying police is not the answer-- questioning the intrinsic racism in policing and changing our communitys' narrative around race, listening to Black experiences, putting people of color in power so their voices are heard, re-imagining how community policing is done-- that's the way forward. In the long run, we need to put our energy into fixing what isn't working, not punishing the cogs in in a broken machine.

Jul 12th
Reply

Ashley Ciamillo

Man attacked police and shot at them with a tazer (considered a deadly weapon). How do people think this is okay and an officer can't defend themselves in a fight. Unfortunate that he died, but these officers RISK THEIR LIVES every day and have to be on guard 100% of the time. How to respond in moments of a fight is decided in milli-seconds. This man is not a murdered. This was a sad outcome to an unfortunate series of events.

Jul 11th
Reply

Alex Mercedes

Every year they audit me but I will absolutely give you my tax returns when it's done... so. he's been audited each year since 2015?

Jul 11th
Reply (1)

James Bahng

I'm done with this podcast. complete FAKE news.

Jul 10th
Reply

Lee Greathouse

Watching the WHO handle COVID is like watching the ministry of magic handling Voldemort's return...

Jul 9th
Reply

Somnambulist_23

😢

Jul 8th
Reply

Freddie Dunn

as a Brit I would have thought the NYT would have someone less biased commenting. this kind of interview doesn't invite a friendly debate of views but helps divide a nation. she basically saw what she wanted to see....

Jul 8th
Reply

Jason Holbrook

must be Trump's fault

Jul 8th
Reply

Haavard

hmmmm , dont think she likes Trump

Jul 8th
Reply

Jonathan Petherbridge

haha, the first sentence gas lights trump! Micheal claims trump is talking about "nation wide protests" when he clearly says revolutionaries, the audio is even played later in the podcast. Unless you think BLM protestersb want to overthrow the government you are objectivity lying. This lie is dark and divisive, not the speech.

Jul 8th
Reply

ID19073149

Why do folks who do not support liberals even listen to this podcast and waste time! :) I cannot support Trump's speech. It was divisive. It may not be divisive for one part of America but it excludes the other - which is not what a president of the country should be stating! God bless America and may common sense prevail!

Jul 7th
Reply (2)
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