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The Daily

Author: The New York Times

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

816 Episodes
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The Post-Acquittal Presidency

The Post-Acquittal Presidency

2020-02-1400:28:0834

Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Mr. Trump called those who testified against him in the impeachment “evil,” “corrupt” and “crooked.” After he was acquitted, he began firing witnesses.A handful of senators reached out to the White House to warn the president not to dismiss Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union who testified in the House hearings. Mr. Trump removed him anyway.
Fear, Fury and the Coronavirus

Fear, Fury and the Coronavirus

2020-02-1300:23:0941

Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin. What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government’s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing’s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Xi Jinping faces an accelerating health crisis that is also a political one: a profound test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself over the past seven years.China’s leader, who rarely mingles with the public, visited several sites in Beijing and spoke to medical workers in Wuhan via video conferencing.Here are the latest updates on the global outbreak.
The Results From New Hampshire

The Results From New Hampshire

2020-02-1200:32:3321

Senator Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire’s Democratic primary last night, with Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar close behind in second and third. After two candidates once considered front-runners, Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, finished toward the back of the pack, we consider what Mr. Sanders’s win means for the rest of the race for the Democratic nomination. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: With his New Hampshire win, Mr. Sanders tightened his grip on the Democratic Party’s liberal wing, benefiting from a field that has divided moderate voters.Here are the full results. Unlike in Iowa, where we have yet to declare an official winner, we can confidently say Mr. Sanders won in New Hampshire in a tight race with Mr. Buttigieg.
Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year’s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don’t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice.Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it’s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He’s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state’s last day of primary campaigning.
A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement — or the end of privacy as we know it?Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on “The Daily,” spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Federal and state law enforcement officers are using one company’s app to make arrests in 49 states. So what is Clearview AI, and what influence does it hold?Clearview’s app is being used by police to identify victims of child sexual abuse. Some question both the ethics and the accuracy of the results.
Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein’s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein’s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein’s legal strategy.Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein’s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Long before an avalanche of allegations against Mr. Weinstein set off a global reckoning over sexual harassment, Ms. Rotunno was steadily building a career as a criminal lawyer in Chicago with an unusual specialty: defending men accused of sex crimes.Haven’t been following the trial? Here’s what’s happened so far.
Mitt Romney’s Lonely Vote

Mitt Romney’s Lonely Vote

2020-02-0600:31:1155

President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Wednesday of both articles of impeachment. While the vote largely fell along party lines, one senator crossed the aisle to vote to convict him. Today, we hear from Senator Mitt Romney about that choice.Guest: Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, who spoke with Mark Leibovich, the Washington-based chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: In a speech before voting to convict, Mr. Romney grew emotional as he pronounced the president “guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust.”“I think this is Senator Romney’s moment to shine,” Senator Amy Klobuchar said before the vote, “I hope he can bring some people with him.” Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at Mr. Romney’s isolation in the Senate and the expectations placed on him before his vote.
The State of the Union

The State of the Union

2020-02-0500:27:4145

Hours after Iowa kicked off the process to choose President Trump’s 2020 opponent, and just a day before the verdict is expected in his Senate impeachment trial, the president gave his third State of the Union address. Today, we take you to The New York Times’s Washington bureau, where we examined the speech — and the unique moment in which it was delivered.Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Though Mr. Trump didn’t mention impeachment, the process hung over his address, and his refusal to shake Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s hand put the bitterness between them on full display.The speech sounded like a re-election pitch, with the president claiming credit for a “great American comeback.”
After a night of chaos and confusion at the Iowa caucuses, and nearly a full day since the results were initially expected, the state’s Democratic Party has announced only partial numbers, from 62 percent of precincts. We look at what the debacle in Iowa will mean for the results — when they’re finally released.“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
A Very Long Night In Iowa

A Very Long Night In Iowa

2020-02-0400:38:5533

The kickoff to the 2020 voting was undercut Monday night by major delays in the reporting of the Iowa caucus results. We traveled to Johnston, Iowa, to tell the story of the day — from the perspective of one caucus in a middle school gym. Guests: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times and Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A new system of reporting caucus results led to confusion and few solid numbers — forcing the Iowa Democratic Party to delay the release of results until a winner could be verified later Tuesday.Here’s where you can see live results as they become available.
With Iowa voters making their choice and the 2020 election getting underway, we’re introducing a new show: one covering the country and its voters in the lead up to Nov. 3. In our first episode of “The Field,” we ask Democratic caucusgoers how they’re feeling about the election. Traveling around the state, we found anxious Iowans asking one question over and over: Who can beat President Trump? Note: This episode contains strong language.Guests: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times, and Austin Mitchell and Andy Mills, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Confused by the Iowa caucuses? Here’s how they work.The New York Times polled 584 Democrats likely to caucus in Iowa. Fifteen of them agreed to talk to us on camera. Here is what they told us.The state with a huge influence in picking presidential candidates doesn’t look much like the country as a whole, except in one very striking way: a rapidly aging population.
The Latest: No Witnesses

The Latest: No Witnesses

2020-02-0100:06:1123

In a 51-to-49 vote, Republicans shut down an effort by Democrats to bring new witnesses and documents into the Senate impeachment trial. As they cleared a path toward acquittal, some Republicans stepped forward to explain why they voted as they did — even though they believed what President Trump did was wrong.“The Latest” is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.
The Lessons of 2016

The Lessons of 2016

2020-01-3100:55:3069

The media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party’s nominees, she would win.With voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, “The Daily” sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he — and the organization — learned from 2016. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: This is our guide to the 2020 election.We’ve sent reporters to every corner of the country and told them not to make any assumptions in this election cycle. Here are some of the most in-depth stories we’ve told in an effort to help the country understand itself.As part of a new approach to election coverage, The Times’s editorial board has re-examined how — and why — it makes presidential endorsements.
Nearly two decades ago, China was at the heart of a public health crisis over a deadly new virus. It said it had made lifesaving reforms since. So why is the Wuhan coronavirus now spreading so rapidly across the world? Our correspondent went to the center of the outbreak to find out. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: What is the coronavirus? And why is China struggling to control its spread around the world?Unless you are at high risk for catching the disease, it may be a good idea to avoid buying a face mask. There is now a shortage of masks, leaving health care workers unprotected and expediting the spread of the disease.
In the question-and-answer stage of the Senate impeachment trial, Alan Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer on President Trump’s legal team, made an argument that stunned many who heard it. Say that Mr. Trump did extend a quid pro quo to Ukraine, and that he did it to improve his own re-election prospects. Says Mr. Dershowitz: What’s wrong with that?“The Latest” is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.
Today, we sit down with Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, to discuss what it’s like to be the leader of a party out of power at this moment in the impeachment trial of President Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: "Look, is it an uphill fight? Yes.” he said. “Are we making progress? Yes.” Why Mr. Schumer believes he can persuade his Republican colleagues to allow new witnesses in the trial.Here are the latest updates on impeachment, including the Senate’s response to a Times investigation revealing new claims about the president’s conduct from his former national security adviser John Bolton.
What John Bolton Knows

What John Bolton Knows

2020-01-2800:23:2140

A firsthand account by John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, directly linked President Trump to a quid pro quo in the Ukraine affair, undercutting a central plank of the defense’s argument. What could that mean for the final phase of the impeachment trial? Guests: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House and Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A Times investigation revealed that Mr. Bolton privately expressed concern to the attorney general last year that the president was effectively granting personal favors to autocratic leaders around the world.Republican senators had been ready to swiftly acquit President Trump. But Mr. Bolton’s revelations in the manuscript of his new book could change the calculus.
Across the United States, parents and school districts have been wrestling with the question of whether the country’s most popular and profitable sport is too dangerous for children. Today, we explore how that dispute is playing out in one Texas town. Guests: Ken Belson, who covers the N.F.L. for The New York Times, spoke with Jim Harris and Spencer Taylor in Marshall, Texas. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Repeated blows to the head while playing football have been linked to a degenerative brain disease called C.T.E.Football is a powerful, cultural force in Marshall, a city of about 24,000 people in East Texas. But residents, coaches and educators have questioned the safety of a sport they cannot imagine living without.
Three Rust Belt swing states are critical to winning the presidency this year — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, there is one issue that could be decisive: fracking natural gas.Opposition to fracking could be fatal for a candidate in the state, yet front-runners for the Democratic nomination have committed to banning fracking nationwide if elected. We went to western Pennsylvania, where fracking affects residents daily, to see whether electability in the state could really be reduced to this single issue.Guests: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times, traveled to Pennsylvania with Andy Mills and Monika Evstatieva, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Our investigative team revealed how immense amounts of methane, the primary gas acquired by fracking, are escaping from oil and gas sites nationwide, worsening global warming.What is fracking? And why is it so harmful to the communities that come in contact with the toxins it leaves behind?
In a moment of national insecurity, with the future of the United Kingdom seemingly hanging in the balance, a new royal couple offered the vision of a unified, progressive future. But the same forces that pushed for Britain to leave the European Union have now pushed Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, to leave the country.Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A wish to carve out more “progressive” roles has led to the loss of perks, privileges and titles — a more thorough break than the Duke and Duchess of Sussex seem to have expected.The couple’s push for greater independence has resurfaced the same questions that animated the Brexit debate.Black Britons expressed support for Harry and Meghan. “Thank God they are free,” one Londoner said. “All of this is about her race. I know it because as a Caribbean woman who did not grow up here, I have experienced it myself.”
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Comments (3066)

Haavard

the USA paid ISIS are you ever going to talk about it , no ofc not

Feb 15th
Reply

Wendy Bruder

what unbelievable disaster. this guy has got to go... for the sake of what is left of the "United" States

Feb 14th
Reply (1)

Sasha Anne Lyn

At this point, who in their right minds would want to be seen as loyal to the most corrupt and childish president in the history of the United States?

Feb 14th
Reply (2)

Philly Burbs

the Joe of 2008 would win. the Joe of 2020 looks like he's going to have a stroke plus he didn't have a reply when asked about Hunter. threatening to beat up another old man lost him about big percentage.

Feb 13th
Reply

R U Poed

Pete didn't have momentum, he had Manufactured Consent from the establishment who covered up him funding the caucus tabulation app and contributing to the DNC who strong armed the Iowa Democratic Party. This isn't news, it's generating a false narrative for a candidate who Would get eviscerated by Trump in a general election

Feb 12th
Reply

snosaer

yang gang ..dang

Feb 12th
Reply

Andrew Wright

Bloomberg is only running to protect his wealth. All he cares about is making sure Bernie doesn't win. He's a fucking Republican.

Feb 12th
Reply

Nonker

More pundit speculations about voter tendencies. How about just once addressing the actual issues? (Notice how Warren’s explanation of *why* she supports Medicare for All was edited out.)

Feb 12th
Reply

Isaac Roman

This interviewer was joking with her subject through a 100% bald faced lie, shocked by how unprofessional she was and I'm disappointed in the New York Times. Get to the truth, ask tough questions, be a journalist.

Feb 12th
Reply

Greg Newman

Are you kidding? This is the worst journalism I've ever heard. You literally had a narrative and went around looking for people to validate it. Shockingly you couldn't find anyone. You're embarassing. Unsubscribe.

Feb 11th
Reply

Crystal Bush

I agree, everyone deserves a defense, but to say that the victim is favored by police is a gross misstatement. Victims are told by police that you must be asulted before they can do anything even if the person has a history.

Feb 11th
Reply

Diane Peters

Simply old-fashioned victim blaming. Nothing new and nothing special about this attorney or her skill set. We shouldn't be surprised: women can be misogynists too.

Feb 11th
Reply

Es Dawg

The interviewer clearly doesn't believe accused men deserve a defense. More so, she is genuinely upset with the notion that women would ever lie on a man. Because we all know that women are incapable of lying.

Feb 11th
Reply

Lori Daly

the devil's assistant hard at work. 😭

Feb 10th
Reply

snosaer

wow i like the creepy static noise when she was talkin to the cop on the phone. felt like my privacy was invaded.

Feb 10th
Reply

Ricardo Mota

Here's what else you need *aneurism* ternerterday!

Feb 10th
Reply

Albert H

Omg! That turn at the 24 min mark was sooo shocking! Unbelievable!

Feb 10th
Reply

Albert H

Omg! That turn at around the 24 min mark was sooo shocking! Unbelievable!

Feb 10th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

I'm still worked up over this a day later. Because here's my thing: I have zero problem believing that men are completely incapable of controlling themselves because they are living by their most base instincts. That means, obviously, that they are more monkey than man. Which is cool, because monkeys don't get to vote or own land. So either men are monkeys, or they are actually people with brains and they need to keep their goddamn hands to themselves. But, as dipshit Donna says, you can't have it both ways. Am I assuming that all men are monkeys, and that just walking out my front door means I'm likely to get raped? If yes, then I can safely assume that Weinstein, being a disgusting monkey, raped all those women. BOOM. Case mother fucking closed, asshole. Contrary wise, if men aren't monkeys, but are rather upstanding citizens who would simply never engage in such negative behavior, then women should feel absolutely safe going out in public, and are not EVER to be held responsible for a rapist's aberrant behavior, because why would women automatically assume that a man would rape her and prepare for that highly unlikely situation? In which case, stop blaming victims for being raped, asshole. BOOM. Case mother fucking closed. You lose either way. Wanna know why? Because, Donna, you are a loser.

Feb 9th
Reply

Amanda Bennett

#RonanFarrow needs to get a hold of this chick

Feb 9th
Reply
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