DiscoverRead-Aloud Revival ®RAR#206: A Simple, Low-Pressure Approach to Teach Shakespeare
RAR#206: A Simple, Low-Pressure Approach to Teach Shakespeare

RAR#206: A Simple, Low-Pressure Approach to Teach Shakespeare

Update: 2022-05-192
Share

Description

Do you want to teach your kids Shakespeare? Do you want to them to carry a love for The Bard in their hearts, and remember passages from the most famous plays ever written?









Maybe your answer is YES!









BUT ...









Shakespeare seems overwhelming. And adding it feels stressful.









So today, RAR Community Director Kortney Garrison and I are breaking down how to teach Shakespeare in a simple, low-pressure way that your kids will actually enjoy and look back on fondly.

































In this episode, you'll hear:







  • a million ways to teach Shakespeare (and maybe only one you want to avoid)
  • how to start with your goals when creating a Shakespeare teaching plan
  • what Kortney and I actually do








Click the play button below or scroll down to keep reading.























A Million Ways to Teach Shakespeare







Kortney is currently teaching The Tempest in her homeschool co-op. Even though they have a deep devotion to Shakespeare at her house, this is actually the first time that she's teaching it formally.









She feels like she's learning things that could only be learned right in the thick of teaching, which brings up our first point:









There are a million ways to teach Shakespeare. There’s not a right way to do it and a wrong way to do it.









Well ... There might be ONE wrong way to do it (ahem) – I’ll talk about that soon.









But what we want to do today is help you think about your goals here so you can figure out the best way to move forward.

















Determine Your Goals







What's your goal in teaching Shakespeare to your kids?









Kortney's goal is that this reading of The Tempest will not be the last Shakespeare play they they read.









(Isn't that a good one!?)









She wants them to find Shakespeare approachable, and maybe learn a few tools for making the next play easier.









"Most of all I want them to fall in love with Shakespeare," she says. "Once I knew what my goal was, I could tailor our work to support our goals."

























Why does your goal matter?







There is a big reason why our goal really matters here:









It's easy to fall into the trap of “covering” Shakespeare – doing it so that you've done it. Doing it with a goal of getting through lots of plays or "covering" Shakespeare.









Oof. I have issues with the word "covering" as it relates to learning, but we'll circle back to talk about that in the future.









Charlotte Mason said:









"At the end of our education the question isn’t how much we know...

Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store
00:00
00:00
x

0.5x

0.8x

1.0x

1.25x

1.5x

2.0x

3.0x

Sleep Timer

Off

End of Episode

5 Minutes

10 Minutes

15 Minutes

30 Minutes

45 Minutes

60 Minutes

120 Minutes

RAR#206: A Simple, Low-Pressure Approach to Teach Shakespeare

RAR#206: A Simple, Low-Pressure Approach to Teach Shakespeare

Sarah Mackenzie