DiscoverShrinking TrumpSpecial Edition: Conviction Day episode, "This is an emergency."
Special Edition: Conviction Day episode, "This is an emergency."

Special Edition: Conviction Day episode, "This is an emergency."

Update: 2024-06-031
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This episode of Shrinking Trump focuses on the psychological impact of Donald Trump's conviction on the electorate. The hosts, Dr. John Gartner and Dr. Harry Siegel, discuss how Trump's conviction has affected the psychology of voters, particularly independents and undecideds, who are more likely to be swayed by the conviction. They also analyze Trump's press conference following the conviction, highlighting his use of projection, paranoia, and victimhood to maintain his base of support. The hosts argue that Democrats need to actively counter Trump's narrative by repeatedly asserting his guilt and the seriousness of his crimes. They also discuss the potential dangers of a wounded malignant narcissist in power, drawing parallels between Trump and Hitler and warning of potential consequences such as concentration camps, bureaucratic purges, and violence against protesters. The episode concludes with a discussion about the psychology of Trump's followers and the reasons why some people continue to support him despite his conviction. The hosts emphasize the importance of Democrats being as vocal and passionate in their response as Trump's supporters, to ensure that the truth prevails.

Outlines

00:00:00
Introduction

This Chapter introduces the hosts, Dr. John Gartner and Dr. Harry Siegel, and the topic of the episode: the psychological impact of Donald Trump's conviction on the electorate.

00:00:08
The Psychology of the Voter

This Chapter delves into the psychological impact of Trump's conviction on voters, particularly independents and undecideds. The hosts discuss how the conviction has shifted public opinion and how it could affect future elections.

00:00:45
Trump's Press Conference

This Chapter analyzes Trump's press conference following his conviction, focusing on his psychological tactics. The hosts discuss his use of projection, paranoia, and victimhood to maintain his base of support.

00:09:20
The Psychology of Trump's Followers

This Chapter explores the psychology of Trump's followers and how he is able to maintain their support despite his conviction. The hosts discuss his use of fear, paranoia, and scapegoating to create a sense of threat and vulnerability.

00:21:04
Trump's Appeal

This Chapter examines the reasons behind Trump's appeal to his followers, highlighting his use of fear, paranoia, and projection. The hosts argue that his followers are willing to overlook his crimes because they believe he is the only one who can protect them from the perceived threats he creates.

00:22:00
Trump's Badge of Honor

This Chapter analyzes Trump's attempt to turn his conviction into a badge of honor. The hosts discuss how he frames his conviction as a sign of his strength and willingness to fight for his supporters.

00:25:02
Malignant Normality

This Chapter introduces the concept of malignant normality, a theory developed by Robert J. Lichten, which explains how malignant narcissists can impose their insane vision on society until it becomes the accepted norm.

00:35:52
Curbside Consult with Lance Dodas

This Chapter features a curbside consult with Lance Dodas, a colleague of the hosts, to discuss the potential dangers of a wounded malignant narcissist in power. Dodas provides insights into Trump's psychology and the potential consequences of his continued influence.

Keywords

Donald Trump
Donald John Trump is an American politician, media personality, and businessman who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021. He was born and raised in the New York City borough of Queens and received an economics degree from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Trump took charge of his family's real-estate business in 1971, renamed it The Trump Organization, and expanded its operations from Queens and Brooklyn into Manhattan. The company built or renovated skyscrapers, hotels, casinos, and golf courses. Trump later started various side ventures, mostly by licensing his name. Trump and his businesses have been involved in more than 4,000 state and federal legal actions, including six bankruptcies. Trump entered the 2016 presidential race as a Republican and defeated 16 other candidates in the primaries. His political positions have been described as populist, protectionist, isolationist, and nationalist. He won the general election against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, despite losing the popular vote. Trump's presidency was marked by controversy, including his policies on immigration, trade, and foreign policy. He was impeached by the House of Representatives in 2019 for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, but was acquitted by the Senate. He was impeached again in 2021 for inciting the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol, but was again acquitted by the Senate. Trump's presidency has had a significant impact on American politics and society, and his legacy continues to be debated.

Malignant Narcissism
Malignant narcissism is a personality disorder characterized by a combination of narcissistic personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and paranoid personality disorder. People with malignant narcissism are often grandiose, manipulative, and lack empathy. They may also be aggressive, hostile, and have a tendency to exploit others. Malignant narcissism is a serious condition that can have a devastating impact on the lives of those who suffer from it and those around them. It is often associated with a history of childhood trauma or abuse.

Projection
Projection is a defense mechanism in which a person unconsciously attributes their own unacceptable thoughts, feelings, or impulses to another person. For example, a person who is angry might project their anger onto another person, accusing them of being angry. Projection can be a way of avoiding responsibility for one's own feelings or actions. It can also be a way of protecting oneself from painful emotions. However, projection can also lead to conflict and misunderstanding in relationships.

Paranoia
Paranoia is a mental state characterized by an irrational and persistent feeling of suspicion and distrust of others. People with paranoia may believe that others are trying to harm them, deceive them, or plot against them. Paranoia can be a symptom of a variety of mental health conditions, including schizophrenia, delusional disorder, and anxiety disorders. It can also be caused by drug use or medical conditions. Paranoia can be a very distressing experience, and it can interfere with a person's ability to function in daily life.

Victimhood
Victimhood is a state of being a victim, often characterized by feelings of helplessness, vulnerability, and resentment. It can be a result of experiencing trauma, abuse, or other forms of harm. Victimhood can also be a self-imposed state, where a person chooses to identify as a victim in order to gain sympathy or attention. While it is important to acknowledge and validate the experiences of victims, it is also important to encourage resilience and empowerment. Victimhood can become a limiting belief that prevents individuals from moving forward and taking control of their lives.

Cult
A cult is a group or movement exhibiting a great or excessive devotion or reverence to a person, idea, or object. Cults often have a charismatic leader who exerts a strong influence over their followers. They may also have strict rules and regulations, and they may isolate their members from the outside world. Cults can be dangerous, as they can lead to manipulation, abuse, and even violence. Some cults are also associated with harmful beliefs or practices, such as the use of mind-altering substances or the belief in conspiracy theories.

Hitler
Adolf Hitler was an Austrian-born German politician who was the dictator of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. He was the leader of the Nazi Party, a far-right political party that espoused antisemitism, racism, and nationalism. Hitler's ideology was based on the belief that the Aryan race was superior to other races and that Germany should expand its territory and power. He came to power in 1933 after the Reichstag fire, which he used to consolidate his power and establish a totalitarian regime. Hitler's regime was responsible for the Holocaust, the systematic genocide of six million Jews, as well as the deaths of millions of other people, including Roma, gay men, and political opponents. Hitler's reign of terror ended in 1945 with the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II. He committed suicide in his bunker in Berlin on April 30, 1945.

Concentration Camps
Concentration camps are detention camps established by the Nazi regime during World War II to imprison and exterminate Jews, Roma, gay men, political opponents, and other groups deemed undesirable by the Nazi government. These camps were characterized by inhumane conditions, forced labor, starvation, and systematic murder. The most notorious concentration camp was Auschwitz, where over one million people were killed. The term "concentration camp" is also used to refer to detention camps established by other regimes, such as the Soviet Union and Cambodia, to imprison and persecute political opponents and other groups.

Tiananmen Square
Tiananmen Square is a large public square in the center of Beijing, China. It is a major tourist destination and a symbol of Chinese power and history. However, it is also known for the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, a series of student-led demonstrations that were brutally suppressed by the Chinese government. On June 4, 1989, the Chinese military opened fire on unarmed protesters, killing hundreds, if not thousands, of people. The Tiananmen Square massacre is a reminder of the Chinese government's willingness to use violence to suppress dissent and maintain its control over the country.

Jim Jones
Jim Jones was an American cult leader who founded the Peoples Temple, a religious group that eventually relocated to Jonestown, Guyana. Jones was a charismatic and manipulative leader who preached a message of racial equality and social justice. However, he also became increasingly authoritarian and paranoid, and he eventually led his followers to commit mass suicide in Jonestown on November 18, 1978. The Jonestown massacre, in which over 900 people died, is one of the most infamous mass suicides in history.

Q&A

  • How has Donald Trump's conviction affected the psychology of voters, particularly independents and undecideds?

    The hosts argue that Trump's conviction has had a significant impact on the psychology of voters, particularly independents and undecideds. They believe that the conviction has made these voters more likely to view Trump as unfit for office and less likely to vote for him in future elections.

  • What psychological tactics did Trump use in his press conference following his conviction?

    Trump used a combination of projection, paranoia, and victimhood in his press conference. He projected his own flaws onto Joe Biden, accusing him of corruption and incompetence. He also claimed to be the victim of a witch hunt and a rigged system, playing on the fears and anxieties of his supporters.

  • Why do Democrats need to actively counter Trump's narrative?

    The hosts argue that Democrats need to actively counter Trump's narrative by repeatedly asserting his guilt and the seriousness of his crimes. They believe that if Democrats fail to do so, Trump's message of victimhood and persecution will prevail.

  • What are the potential dangers of a wounded malignant narcissist in power?

    The hosts warn that a wounded malignant narcissist in power can be extremely dangerous. They draw parallels between Trump and Hitler, highlighting the potential for concentration camps, bureaucratic purges, and violence against protesters.

  • What are the reasons behind Trump's appeal to his followers?

    Trump's appeal to his followers is based on a combination of fear, paranoia, and projection. He creates a sense of threat and vulnerability, and he positions himself as the only one who can protect them from the perceived dangers he creates.

  • How does Trump attempt to turn his conviction into a badge of honor?

    Trump frames his conviction as a sign of his strength and willingness to fight for his supporters. He claims to be a martyr who is being persecuted for his beliefs and his commitment to "making America great again."

  • What is malignant normality, and how does it apply to Trump?

    Malignant normality is a theory developed by Robert J. Lichten that explains how malignant narcissists can impose their insane vision on society until it becomes the accepted norm. The hosts argue that Trump is attempting to create a malignant normality in which his distorted beliefs and values become the dominant ideology.

  • What are the potential consequences of Trump's continued influence?

    The hosts warn that Trump's continued influence could lead to a number of negative consequences, including the erosion of democratic institutions, the rise of authoritarianism, and an increase in social and political unrest.

  • Why do some people continue to support Trump despite his conviction?

    The hosts identify several reasons why some people continue to support Trump. Some are in a cult-like following and believe that the trial was a fraud. Others need to believe in his power and authority. Still others support him because he serves their interests, regardless of his actions.

  • What are the key takeaways from this episode of Shrinking Trump?

    This episode of Shrinking Trump highlights the importance of understanding the psychological impact of Donald Trump's conviction on the electorate. The hosts argue that Democrats need to actively counter Trump's narrative and assert the reality of his crimes. They also warn of the potential dangers of a wounded malignant narcissist in power and the importance of resisting his attempts to create a malignant normality.

Show Notes

Top Psychologists John Gartner and Harry Segal discuss with Dr. Lance Dodes the psychological fallout America will have to brace itself for, following the first conviction of an unhinged former President in history on Really American's SMASH HIT podcast, Shrinking Trump.


This special episode is an "emergency session” of the iTunes chart-topping podcast to discuss fallout from the unstable Republican presidential candidate that could have dire consequences.


Our site: https://cms.megaphone.fm/channel/shrinking-trump 


Subscribe on iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/shrinking-trump/id1745797271 


Subscribe on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4xuuqHxzruLEsQXtTuJjP4 


Subscribe on Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/a101a15a-8b18-49c8-b556-c201aece30ee/shrinking-trump 


Subscribe on iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-shrinking-trump-175213669/ 


Returning to the show for this special is our friend Dr. Dodes, a retired assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. In this episode, Lance will be helping our hosts psychoanalyze Trump’s unhinged press conference from the morning after he was convicted of 34 felonies. 


“Right now, Donald Trump is a wounded animal, " John said. “There's nothing more dangerous than a wounded animal. And there's really nothing more dangerous than a wounded malignant narcissist.”


Using video and direct quotes, our hosts provide you with an in-depth analysis of how Trump’s projection, narcissism, sociopathy, and dementia were on full display in his sham of a press conference. “Remember, this is a press conference to explain why he's been convicted of 34 felonies,” said Dr. Gartner. “But from the way he presents it, you'd think he was there to accept an award.”


Dr. Dodes walks us through his own diagnosis of Trump’s performance, and helps us understand the dangerous psychology of how a now-wounded malignant narcissist like Trump would respond if he were to regain power. He also gives us a rundown of the deranged cult mentality that empowers charismatic leaders like Trump, and the interpersonal effects his distorted beliefs have on his followers.


Trump’s ability to manipulate the truth rests in his ability to repeat his lies over and over. But he’s also helped by an army of surrogates who parrot his false reality. In this episode, we’ll be taking a hard look at how the conviction and these competing realities might affect the psychology of voters. 


There’s also a chilling conversation comparing Trump’s malignant narcissism to Hitler’s that you are not going to want to miss. “I've been saying now for six years that Donald Trump is the American Hitler,” John explained. “And immigrants are the new Jews.”


Dr. Segal said it best when sounding the alarm. “We're not saying this as political activists,” he said. “We're talking about a very disturbed person with tremendous power and influence saying psychotic things that are organized around evoking rage and fear in his supporters.”

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Special Edition: Conviction Day episode, "This is an emergency."

Special Edition: Conviction Day episode, "This is an emergency."

Really American Media